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Merge branch 'master' of master.kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux-2.6

Conflicts:
	Documentation/feature-removal-schedule.txt
	drivers/scsi/fcoe/fcoe.c
	net/core/drop_monitor.c
	net/core/net-traces.c
master
David S. Miller 13 years ago
parent
commit
9cbc1cb8cd
  1. 10
      .gitignore
  2. 59
      Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-block
  3. 33
      Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-bus-pci-devices-cciss
  4. 18
      Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-devices-cache_disable
  5. 479
      Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-kernel-slab
  6. 19
      Documentation/Changes
  7. 4
      Documentation/CodingStyle
  8. 16
      Documentation/DMA-API.txt
  9. 3
      Documentation/DocBook/Makefile
  10. 89
      Documentation/DocBook/tracepoint.tmpl
  11. 2
      Documentation/RCU/rculist_nulls.txt
  12. 102
      Documentation/RCU/trace.txt
  13. 2
      Documentation/SM501.txt
  14. 20
      Documentation/Smack.txt
  15. 82
      Documentation/SubmittingPatches
  16. 10
      Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/GPIO.txt
  17. 2
      Documentation/block/biodoc.txt
  18. 2
      Documentation/block/deadline-iosched.txt
  19. 2
      Documentation/braille-console.txt
  20. 4
      Documentation/dell_rbu.txt
  21. 31
      Documentation/development-process/5.Posting
  22. 2
      Documentation/driver-model/devres.txt
  23. 8
      Documentation/edac.txt
  24. 2
      Documentation/fb/sh7760fb.txt
  25. 10
      Documentation/feature-removal-schedule.txt
  26. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/autofs4-mount-control.txt
  27. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt
  28. 158
      Documentation/filesystems/debugfs.txt
  29. 6
      Documentation/filesystems/ext4.txt
  30. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/fiemap.txt
  31. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/gfs2-glocks.txt
  32. 19
      Documentation/filesystems/gfs2.txt
  33. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/nfs-rdma.txt
  34. 4
      Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt
  35. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/sysfs-pci.txt
  36. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/tmpfs.txt
  37. 8
      Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt
  38. 131
      Documentation/futex-requeue-pi.txt
  39. 2
      Documentation/gpio.txt
  40. 6
      Documentation/hwmon/sysfs-interface
  41. 17
      Documentation/i2c/busses/i2c-ocores
  42. 2
      Documentation/ide/ide.txt
  43. 103
      Documentation/input/multi-touch-protocol.txt
  44. 116
      Documentation/kbuild/kconfig.txt
  45. 2
      Documentation/kbuild/modules.txt
  46. 4
      Documentation/kdump/kdump.txt
  47. 75
      Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
  48. 142
      Documentation/kmemleak.txt
  49. 2
      Documentation/kobject.txt
  50. 2
      Documentation/laptops/acer-wmi.txt
  51. 2
      Documentation/laptops/sony-laptop.txt
  52. 2
      Documentation/laptops/thinkpad-acpi.txt
  53. 3
      Documentation/lguest/Makefile
  54. 1008
      Documentation/lguest/lguest.c
  55. 1
      Documentation/lguest/lguest.txt
  56. 2
      Documentation/local_ops.txt
  57. 129
      Documentation/memory-barriers.txt
  58. 8
      Documentation/memory-hotplug.txt
  59. 2
      Documentation/mn10300/ABI.txt
  60. 12
      Documentation/mtd/nand_ecc.txt
  61. 6
      Documentation/networking/bonding.txt
  62. 2
      Documentation/networking/can.txt
  63. 2
      Documentation/networking/dm9000.txt
  64. 2
      Documentation/networking/l2tp.txt
  65. 2
      Documentation/networking/netdevices.txt
  66. 2
      Documentation/networking/phonet.txt
  67. 2
      Documentation/networking/regulatory.txt
  68. 34
      Documentation/power/devices.txt
  69. 2
      Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.txt
  70. 2
      Documentation/power/regulator/overview.txt
  71. 2
      Documentation/power/s2ram.txt
  72. 2
      Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.txt
  73. 4
      Documentation/powerpc/booting-without-of.txt
  74. 2
      Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/board.txt
  75. 2
      Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/cpm.txt
  76. 2
      Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/gpio.txt
  77. 2
      Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/msi-pic.txt
  78. 4
      Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/pmc.txt
  79. 2
      Documentation/powerpc/qe_firmware.txt
  80. 10
      Documentation/rbtree.txt
  81. 4
      Documentation/s390/Debugging390.txt
  82. 2
      Documentation/scheduler/sched-nice-design.txt
  83. 20
      Documentation/scheduler/sched-rt-group.txt
  84. 2
      Documentation/scsi/aic79xx.txt
  85. 4
      Documentation/scsi/ncr53c8xx.txt
  86. 2
      Documentation/scsi/sym53c8xx_2.txt
  87. 38
      Documentation/sound/alsa/ALSA-Configuration.txt
  88. 19
      Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio-Models.txt
  89. 2
      Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt
  90. 39
      Documentation/sound/alsa/Procfile.txt
  91. 163
      Documentation/sound/alsa/README.maya44
  92. 2
      Documentation/sound/alsa/hda_codec.txt
  93. 1
      Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/dapm.txt
  94. 11
      Documentation/sysctl/kernel.txt
  95. 4
      Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt
  96. 2
      Documentation/timers/hpet.txt
  97. 2
      Documentation/timers/timer_stats.txt
  98. 90
      Documentation/trace/events.txt
  99. 19
      Documentation/trace/ftrace.txt
  100. 2
      Documentation/trace/kmemtrace.txt

10
.gitignore

@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
# subdirectories here. Add them in the ".gitignore" file
# in that subdirectory instead.
#
# NOTE! Please use 'git-ls-files -i --exclude-standard'
# NOTE! Please use 'git ls-files -i --exclude-standard'
# command after changing this file, to see if there are
# any tracked files which get ignored after the change.
#
@ -25,6 +25,8 @@
*.elf
*.bin
*.gz
*.lzma
*.patch
#
# Top-level generic files
@ -62,6 +64,12 @@ series
cscope.*
ncscope.*
# gnu global files
GPATH
GRTAGS
GSYMS
GTAGS
*.orig
*~
\#*#

59
Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-block

@ -60,3 +60,62 @@ Description:
Indicates whether the block layer should automatically
generate checksums for write requests bound for
devices that support receiving integrity metadata.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/alignment_offset
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report a physical block size that is
bigger than the logical block size (for instance a drive
with 4KB physical sectors exposing 512-byte logical
blocks to the operating system). This parameter
indicates how many bytes the beginning of the device is
offset from the disk's natural alignment.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/<partition>/alignment_offset
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report a physical block size that is
bigger than the logical block size (for instance a drive
with 4KB physical sectors exposing 512-byte logical
blocks to the operating system). This parameter
indicates how many bytes the beginning of the partition
is offset from the disk's natural alignment.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/logical_block_size
Date: May 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
This is the smallest unit the storage device can
address. It is typically 512 bytes.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/physical_block_size
Date: May 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
This is the smallest unit the storage device can write
without resorting to read-modify-write operation. It is
usually the same as the logical block size but may be
bigger. One example is SATA drives with 4KB sectors
that expose a 512-byte logical block size to the
operating system.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/minimum_io_size
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report a preferred minimum I/O size,
which is the smallest request the device can perform
without incurring a read-modify-write penalty. For disk
drives this is often the physical block size. For RAID
arrays it is often the stripe chunk size.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/optimal_io_size
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report an optimal I/O size, which is
the device's preferred unit of receiving I/O. This is
rarely reported for disk drives. For RAID devices it is
usually the stripe width or the internal block size.

33
Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-bus-pci-devices-cciss

@ -0,0 +1,33 @@
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/model
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 0 model for logical drive
Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/rev
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 0 revision for logical
drive Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/unique_id
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 83 serial number for logical
drive Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/vendor
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 0 vendor for logical drive
Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/block:cciss!cXdY
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: A symbolic link to /sys/block/cciss!cXdY

18
Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-devices-cache_disable

@ -0,0 +1,18 @@
What: /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/cache/index*/cache_disable_X
Date: August 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.27
Contact: mark.langsdorf@amd.com
Description: These files exist in every cpu's cache index directories.
There are currently 2 cache_disable_# files in each
directory. Reading from these files on a supported
processor will return that cache disable index value
for that processor and node. Writing to one of these
files will cause the specificed cache index to be disabled.
Currently, only AMD Family 10h Processors support cache index
disable, and only for their L3 caches. See the BIOS and
Kernel Developer's Guide at
http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/31116-Public-GH-BKDG_3.20_2-4-09.pdf
for formatting information and other details on the
cache index disable.
Users: joachim.deguara@amd.com

479
Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-kernel-slab

@ -0,0 +1,479 @@
What: /sys/kernel/slab
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The /sys/kernel/slab directory contains a snapshot of the
internal state of the SLUB allocator for each cache. Certain
files may be modified to change the behavior of the cache (and
any cache it aliases, if any).
Users: kernel memory tuning tools
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/aliases
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The aliases file is read-only and specifies how many caches
have merged into this cache.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/align
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The align file is read-only and specifies the cache's object
alignment in bytes.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/alloc_calls
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The alloc_calls file is read-only and lists the kernel code
locations from which allocations for this cache were performed.
The alloc_calls file only contains information if debugging is
enabled for that cache (see Documentation/vm/slub.txt).
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/alloc_fastpath
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The alloc_fastpath file is read-only and specifies how many
objects have been allocated using the fast path.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/alloc_from_partial
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The alloc_from_partial file is read-only and specifies how
many times a cpu slab has been full and it has been refilled
by using a slab from the list of partially used slabs.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/alloc_refill
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The alloc_refill file is read-only and specifies how many
times the per-cpu freelist was empty but there were objects
available as the result of remote cpu frees.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/alloc_slab
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The alloc_slab file is read-only and specifies how many times
a new slab had to be allocated from the page allocator.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/alloc_slowpath
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The alloc_slowpath file is read-only and specifies how many
objects have been allocated using the slow path because of a
refill or allocation from a partial or new slab.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/cache_dma
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The cache_dma file is read-only and specifies whether objects
are from ZONE_DMA.
Available when CONFIG_ZONE_DMA is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/cpu_slabs
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The cpu_slabs file is read-only and displays how many cpu slabs
are active and their NUMA locality.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/cpuslab_flush
Date: April 2009
KernelVersion: 2.6.31
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file cpuslab_flush is read-only and specifies how many
times a cache's cpu slabs have been flushed as the result of
destroying or shrinking a cache, a cpu going offline, or as
the result of forcing an allocation from a certain node.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/ctor
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The ctor file is read-only and specifies the cache's object
constructor function, which is invoked for each object when a
new slab is allocated.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/deactivate_empty
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file deactivate_empty is read-only and specifies how many
times an empty cpu slab was deactivated.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/deactivate_full
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file deactivate_full is read-only and specifies how many
times a full cpu slab was deactivated.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/deactivate_remote_frees
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file deactivate_remote_frees is read-only and specifies how
many times a cpu slab has been deactivated and contained free
objects that were freed remotely.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/deactivate_to_head
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file deactivate_to_head is read-only and specifies how
many times a partial cpu slab was deactivated and added to the
head of its node's partial list.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/deactivate_to_tail
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file deactivate_to_tail is read-only and specifies how
many times a partial cpu slab was deactivated and added to the
tail of its node's partial list.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/destroy_by_rcu
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The destroy_by_rcu file is read-only and specifies whether
slabs (not objects) are freed by rcu.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/free_add_partial
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file free_add_partial is read-only and specifies how many
times an object has been freed in a full slab so that it had to
added to its node's partial list.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/free_calls
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The free_calls file is read-only and lists the locations of
object frees if slab debugging is enabled (see
Documentation/vm/slub.txt).
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/free_fastpath
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The free_fastpath file is read-only and specifies how many
objects have been freed using the fast path because it was an
object from the cpu slab.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/free_frozen
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The free_frozen file is read-only and specifies how many
objects have been freed to a frozen slab (i.e. a remote cpu
slab).
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/free_remove_partial
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file free_remove_partial is read-only and specifies how
many times an object has been freed to a now-empty slab so
that it had to be removed from its node's partial list.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/free_slab
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The free_slab file is read-only and specifies how many times an
empty slab has been freed back to the page allocator.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/free_slowpath
Date: February 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The free_slowpath file is read-only and specifies how many
objects have been freed using the slow path (i.e. to a full or
partial slab).
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/hwcache_align
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The hwcache_align file is read-only and specifies whether
objects are aligned on cachelines.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/min_partial
Date: February 2009
KernelVersion: 2.6.30
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Description:
The min_partial file specifies how many empty slabs shall
remain on a node's partial list to avoid the overhead of
allocating new slabs. Such slabs may be reclaimed by utilizing
the shrink file.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/object_size
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The object_size file is read-only and specifies the cache's
object size.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/objects
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The objects file is read-only and displays how many objects are
active and from which nodes they are from.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/objects_partial
Date: April 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.26
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The objects_partial file is read-only and displays how many
objects are on partial slabs and from which nodes they are
from.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/objs_per_slab
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file objs_per_slab is read-only and specifies how many
objects may be allocated from a single slab of the order
specified in /sys/kernel/slab/cache/order.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/order
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The order file specifies the page order at which new slabs are
allocated. It is writable and can be changed to increase the
number of objects per slab. If a slab cannot be allocated
because of fragmentation, SLUB will retry with the minimum order
possible depending on its characteristics.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/order_fallback
Date: April 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.26
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file order_fallback is read-only and specifies how many
times an allocation of a new slab has not been possible at the
cache's order and instead fallen back to its minimum possible
order.
Available when CONFIG_SLUB_STATS is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/partial
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The partial file is read-only and displays how long many
partial slabs there are and how long each node's list is.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/poison
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The poison file specifies whether objects should be poisoned
when a new slab is allocated.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/reclaim_account
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The reclaim_account file specifies whether the cache's objects
are reclaimable (and grouped by their mobility).
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/red_zone
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The red_zone file specifies whether the cache's objects are red
zoned.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/remote_node_defrag_ratio
Date: January 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.25
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The file remote_node_defrag_ratio specifies the percentage of
times SLUB will attempt to refill the cpu slab with a partial
slab from a remote node as opposed to allocating a new slab on
the local node. This reduces the amount of wasted memory over
the entire system but can be expensive.
Available when CONFIG_NUMA is enabled.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/sanity_checks
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The sanity_checks file specifies whether expensive checks
should be performed on free and, at minimum, enables double free
checks. Caches that enable sanity_checks cannot be merged with
caches that do not.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/shrink
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The shrink file is written when memory should be reclaimed from
a cache. Empty partial slabs are freed and the partial list is
sorted so the slabs with the fewest available objects are used
first.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/slab_size
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The slab_size file is read-only and specifies the object size
with metadata (debugging information and alignment) in bytes.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/slabs
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The slabs file is read-only and displays how long many slabs
there are (both cpu and partial) and from which nodes they are
from.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/store_user
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The store_user file specifies whether the location of
allocation or free should be tracked for a cache.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/total_objects
Date: April 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.26
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The total_objects file is read-only and displays how many total
objects a cache has and from which nodes they are from.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/trace
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
The trace file specifies whether object allocations and frees
should be traced.
What: /sys/kernel/slab/cache/validate
Date: May 2007
KernelVersion: 2.6.22
Contact: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi>,
Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
Description:
Writing to the validate file causes SLUB to traverse all of its
cache's objects and check the validity of metadata.

19
Documentation/Changes

@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ hardware, for example, you probably needn't concern yourself with
isdn4k-utils.
o Gnu C 3.2 # gcc --version
o Gnu make 3.79.1 # make --version
o Gnu make 3.80 # make --version
o binutils 2.12 # ld -v
o util-linux 2.10o # fdformat --version
o module-init-tools 0.9.10 # depmod -V
@ -48,6 +48,7 @@ o procps 3.2.0 # ps --version
o oprofile 0.9 # oprofiled --version
o udev 081 # udevinfo -V
o grub 0.93 # grub --version
o mcelog 0.6
Kernel compilation
==================
@ -61,7 +62,7 @@ computer.
Make
----
You will need Gnu make 3.79.1 or later to build the kernel.
You will need Gnu make 3.80 or later to build the kernel.
Binutils
--------
@ -276,6 +277,16 @@ before running exportfs or mountd. It is recommended that all NFS
services be protected from the internet-at-large by a firewall where
that is possible.
mcelog
------
In Linux 2.6.31+ the i386 kernel needs to run the mcelog utility
as a regular cronjob similar to the x86-64 kernel to process and log
machine check events when CONFIG_X86_NEW_MCE is enabled. Machine check
events are errors reported by the CPU. Processing them is strongly encouraged.
All x86-64 kernels since 2.6.4 require the mcelog utility to
process machine checks.
Getting updated software
========================
@ -365,6 +376,10 @@ FUSE
----
o <http://sourceforge.net/projects/fuse>
mcelog
------
o <ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/cpu/mce/mcelog/>
Networking
**********

4
Documentation/CodingStyle

@ -698,8 +698,8 @@ very often is not. Abundant use of the inline keyword leads to a much bigger
kernel, which in turn slows the system as a whole down, due to a bigger
icache footprint for the CPU and simply because there is less memory
available for the pagecache. Just think about it; a pagecache miss causes a
disk seek, which easily takes 5 miliseconds. There are a LOT of cpu cycles
that can go into these 5 miliseconds.
disk seek, which easily takes 5 milliseconds. There are a LOT of cpu cycles
that can go into these 5 milliseconds.
A reasonable rule of thumb is to not put inline at functions that have more
than 3 lines of code in them. An exception to this rule are the cases where

16
Documentation/DMA-API.txt

@ -676,8 +676,8 @@ this directory the following files can currently be found:
dma-api/all_errors This file contains a numeric value. If this
value is not equal to zero the debugging code
will print a warning for every error it finds
into the kernel log. Be carefull with this
option. It can easily flood your logs.
into the kernel log. Be careful with this
option, as it can easily flood your logs.
dma-api/disabled This read-only file contains the character 'Y'
if the debugging code is disabled. This can
@ -704,12 +704,24 @@ this directory the following files can currently be found:
The current number of free dma_debug_entries
in the allocator.
dma-api/driver-filter
You can write a name of a driver into this file
to limit the debug output to requests from that
particular driver. Write an empty string to
that file to disable the filter and see
all errors again.
If you have this code compiled into your kernel it will be enabled by default.
If you want to boot without the bookkeeping anyway you can provide
'dma_debug=off' as a boot parameter. This will disable DMA-API debugging.
Notice that you can not enable it again at runtime. You have to reboot to do
so.
If you want to see debug messages only for a special device driver you can
specify the dma_debug_driver=<drivername> parameter. This will enable the
driver filter at boot time. The debug code will only print errors for that
driver afterwards. This filter can be disabled or changed later using debugfs.
When the code disables itself at runtime this is most likely because it ran
out of dma_debug_entries. These entries are preallocated at boot. The number
of preallocated entries is defined per architecture. If it is too low for you

3
Documentation/DocBook/Makefile

@ -13,7 +13,8 @@ DOCBOOKS := z8530book.xml mcabook.xml device-drivers.xml \
gadget.xml libata.xml mtdnand.xml librs.xml rapidio.xml \
genericirq.xml s390-drivers.xml uio-howto.xml scsi.xml \
mac80211.xml debugobjects.xml sh.xml regulator.xml \
alsa-driver-api.xml writing-an-alsa-driver.xml
alsa-driver-api.xml writing-an-alsa-driver.xml \
tracepoint.xml
###
# The build process is as follows (targets):

89
Documentation/DocBook/tracepoint.tmpl

@ -0,0 +1,89 @@
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.1.2//EN"
"http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.1.2/docbookx.dtd" []>
<book id="Tracepoints">
<bookinfo>
<title>The Linux Kernel Tracepoint API</title>
<authorgroup>
<author>
<firstname>Jason</firstname>
<surname>Baron</surname>
<affiliation>
<address>
<email>jbaron@redhat.com</email>
</address>
</affiliation>
</author>
</authorgroup>
<legalnotice>
<para>
This documentation is free software; you can redistribute
it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public
License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later
version.
</para>
<para>
This program is distributed in the hope that it will be
useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied
warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
See the GNU General Public License for more details.
</para>
<para>
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
License along with this program; if not, write to the Free
Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston,
MA 02111-1307 USA
</para>
<para>
For more details see the file COPYING in the source
distribution of Linux.
</para>
</legalnotice>
</bookinfo>
<toc></toc>
<chapter id="intro">
<title>Introduction</title>
<para>
Tracepoints are static probe points that are located in strategic points
throughout the kernel. 'Probes' register/unregister with tracepoints
via a callback mechanism. The 'probes' are strictly typed functions that
are passed a unique set of parameters defined by each tracepoint.
</para>
<para>
From this simple callback mechanism, 'probes' can be used to profile, debug,
and understand kernel behavior. There are a number of tools that provide a
framework for using 'probes'. These tools include Systemtap, ftrace, and
LTTng.
</para>
<para>
Tracepoints are defined in a number of header files via various macros. Thus,
the purpose of this document is to provide a clear accounting of the available
tracepoints. The intention is to understand not only what tracepoints are
available but also to understand where future tracepoints might be added.
</para>
<para>
The API presented has functions of the form:
<function>trace_tracepointname(function parameters)</function>. These are the
tracepoints callbacks that are found throughout the code. Registering and
unregistering probes with these callback sites is covered in the
<filename>Documentation/trace/*</filename> directory.
</para>
</chapter>
<chapter id="irq">
<title>IRQ</title>
!Iinclude/trace/events/irq.h
</chapter>
</book>

2
Documentation/RCU/rculist_nulls.txt

@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ to another chain) checking the final 'nulls' value if
the lookup met the end of chain. If final 'nulls' value
is not the slot number, then we must restart the lookup at
the beginning. If the object was moved to the same chain,
then the reader doesnt care : It might eventually
then the reader doesn't care : It might eventually
scan the list again without harm.

102
Documentation/RCU/trace.txt

@ -192,23 +192,24 @@ rcu/rcuhier (which displays the struct rcu_node hierarchy).
The output of "cat rcu/rcudata" looks as follows:
rcu:
0 c=4011 g=4012 pq=1 pqc=4011 qp=0 rpfq=1 rp=3c2a dt=23301/73 dn=2 df=1882 of=0 ri=2126 ql=2 b=10
1 c=4011 g=4012 pq=1 pqc=4011 qp=0 rpfq=3 rp=39a6 dt=78073/1 dn=2 df=1402 of=0 ri=1875 ql=46 b=10
2 c=4010 g=4010 pq=1 pqc=4010 qp=0 rpfq=-5 rp=1d12 dt=16646/0 dn=2 df=3140 of=0 ri=2080 ql=0 b=10
3 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=2b50 dt=21159/1 dn=2 df=2230 of=0 ri=1923 ql=72 b=10
4 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1644 dt=5783/1 dn=2 df=3348 of=0 ri=2805 ql=7 b=10
5 c=4012 g=4013 pq=0 pqc=4011 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1aac dt=5879/1 dn=2 df=3140 of=0 ri=2066 ql=10 b=10
6 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=ed8 dt=5847/1 dn=2 df=3797 of=0 ri=1266 ql=10 b=10
7 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1fa2 dt=6199/1 dn=2 df=2795 of=0 ri=2162 ql=28 b=10
rcu:
0 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=10951/1 dn=0 df=1101 of=0 ri=36 ql=0 b=10
1 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=16117/1 dn=0 df=1015 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
2 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=1445/1 dn=0 df=1839 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
3 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=6681/1 dn=0 df=1545 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
4 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=1003/1 dn=0 df=1992 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
5 c=17829 g=17830 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=1 dt=3887/1 dn=0 df=3331 of=0 ri=4 ql=2 b=10
6 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=859/1 dn=0 df=3224 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
7 c=17829 g=17830 pq=0 pqc=17829 qp=1 dt=3761/1 dn=0 df=1818 of=0 ri=0 ql=2 b=10
rcu_bh:
0 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=0 rpfq=-145 rp=21d6 dt=23301/73 dn=2 df=0 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
1 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-170 rp=20ce dt=78073/1 dn=2 df=26 of=0 ri=5 ql=0 b=10
2 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-83 rp=fbd dt=16646/0 dn=2 df=28 of=0 ri=4 ql=0 b=10
3 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=0 rpfq=-105 rp=178c dt=21159/1 dn=2 df=28 of=0 ri=2 ql=0 b=10
4 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-30 rp=b54 dt=5783/1 dn=2 df=32 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
5 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-29 rp=df5 dt=5879/1 dn=2 df=30 of=0 ri=3 ql=0 b=10
6 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-28 rp=788 dt=5847/1 dn=2 df=32 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
7 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-53 rp=1098 dt=6199/1 dn=2 df=30 of=0 ri=3 ql=0 b=10
0 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=10951/1 dn=0 df=0 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
1 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=16117/1 dn=0 df=13 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
2 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=1445/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
3 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=6681/1 dn=0 df=9 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
4 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=1003/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
5 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=3887/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
6 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=859/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
7 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=3761/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
The first section lists the rcu_data structures for rcu, the second for
rcu_bh. Each section has one line per CPU, or eight for this 8-CPU system.
@ -253,12 +254,6 @@ o "pqc" indicates which grace period the last-observed quiescent
o "qp" indicates that RCU still expects a quiescent state from
this CPU.
o "rpfq" is the number of rcu_pending() calls on this CPU required
to induce this CPU to invoke force_quiescent_state().
o "rp" is low-order four hex digits of the count of how many times
rcu_pending() has been invoked on this CPU.
o "dt" is the current value of the dyntick counter that is incremented
when entering or leaving dynticks idle state, either by the
scheduler or by irq. The number after the "/" is the interrupt
@ -305,6 +300,9 @@ o "b" is the batch limit for this CPU. If more than this number
of RCU callbacks is ready to invoke, then the remainder will
be deferred.
There is also an rcu/rcudata.csv file with the same information in
comma-separated-variable spreadsheet format.
The output of "cat rcu/rcugp" looks as follows:
@ -411,3 +409,63 @@ o Each element of the form "1/1 0:127 ^0" represents one struct
For example, the first entry at the lowest level shows
"^0", indicating that it corresponds to bit zero in
the first entry at the middle level.
The output of "cat rcu/rcu_pending" looks as follows:
rcu:
0 np=255892 qsp=53936 cbr=0 cng=14417 gpc=10033 gps=24320 nf=6445 nn=146741
1 np=261224 qsp=54638 cbr=0 cng=25723 gpc=16310 gps=2849 nf=5912 nn=155792
2 np=237496 qsp=49664 cbr=0 cng=2762 gpc=45478 gps=1762 nf=1201 nn=136629
3 np=236249 qsp=48766 cbr=0 cng=286 gpc=48049 gps=1218 nf=207 nn=137723
4 np=221310 qsp=46850 cbr=0 cng=26 gpc=43161 gps=4634 nf=3529 nn=123110
5 np=237332 qsp=48449 cbr=0 cng=54 gpc=47920 gps=3252 nf=201 nn=137456
6 np=219995 qsp=46718 cbr=0 cng=50 gpc=42098 gps=6093 nf=4202 nn=120834
7 np=249893 qsp=49390 cbr=0 cng=72 gpc=38400 gps=17102 nf=41 nn=144888
rcu_bh:
0 np=146741 qsp=1419 cbr=0 cng=6 gpc=0 gps=0 nf=2 nn=145314
1 np=155792 qsp=12597 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=8 nf=3 nn=143180
2 np=136629 qsp=18680 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=7 gps=6 nf=0 nn=117936
3 np=137723 qsp=2843 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=10 gps=7 nf=0 nn=134863
4 np=123110 qsp=12433 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=2 nf=0 nn=110671
5 np=137456 qsp=4210 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=5 nf=0 nn=133235
6 np=120834 qsp=9902 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=3 nf=2 nn=110921
7 np=144888 qsp=26336 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=8 gps=2 nf=0 nn=118542
As always, this is once again split into "rcu" and "rcu_bh" portions.
The fields are as follows:
o "np" is the number of times that __rcu_pending() has been invoked
for the corresponding flavor of RCU.
o "qsp" is the number of times that the RCU was waiting for a
quiescent state from this CPU.
o "cbr" is the number of times that this CPU had RCU callbacks
that had passed through a grace period, and were thus ready
to be invoked.
o "cng" is the number of times that this CPU needed another
grace period while RCU was idle.
o "gpc" is the number of times that an old grace period had
completed, but this CPU was not yet aware of it.
o "gps" is the number of times that a new grace period had started,
but this CPU was not yet aware of it.
o "nf" is the number of times that this CPU suspected that the
current grace period had run for too long, and thus needed to
be forced.
Please note that "forcing" consists of sending resched IPIs
to holdout CPUs. If that CPU really still is in an old RCU
read-side critical section, then we really do have to wait for it.
The assumption behing "forcing" is that the CPU is not still in
an old RCU read-side critical section, but has not yet responded
for some other reason.
o "nn" is the number of times that this CPU needed nothing. Alert
readers will note that the rcu "nn" number for a given CPU very
closely matches the rcu_bh "np" number for that same CPU. This
is due to short-circuit evaluation in rcu_pending().

2
Documentation/SM501.txt

@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ Copyright 2006, 2007 Simtec Electronics
The Silicon Motion SM501 multimedia companion chip is a multifunction device
which may provide numerous interfaces including USB host controller USB gadget,
Asyncronous Serial ports, Audio functions and a dual display video interface.
asynchronous serial ports, audio functions, and a dual display video interface.
The device may be connected by PCI or local bus with varying functions enabled.
Core

20
Documentation/Smack.txt

@ -184,8 +184,9 @@ length. Single character labels using special characters, that being anything
other than a letter or digit, are reserved for use by the Smack development
team. Smack labels are unstructured, case sensitive, and the only operation
ever performed on them is comparison for equality. Smack labels cannot
contain unprintable characters or the "/" (slash) character. Smack labels
cannot begin with a '-', which is reserved for special options.
contain unprintable characters, the "/" (slash), the "\" (backslash), the "'"
(quote) and '"' (double-quote) characters.
Smack labels cannot begin with a '-', which is reserved for special options.
There are some predefined labels:
@ -523,3 +524,18 @@ Smack supports some mount options:
These mount options apply to all file system types.
Smack auditing
If you want Smack auditing of security events, you need to set CONFIG_AUDIT
in your kernel configuration.
By default, all denied events will be audited. You can change this behavior by
writing a single character to the /smack/logging file :
0 : no logging
1 : log denied (default)
2 : log accepted
3 : log denied & accepted
Events are logged as 'key=value' pairs, for each event you at least will get
the subjet, the object, the rights requested, the action, the kernel function
that triggered the event, plus other pairs depending on the type of event
audited.

82
Documentation/SubmittingPatches

@ -91,6 +91,10 @@ Be as specific as possible. The WORST descriptions possible include
things like "update driver X", "bug fix for driver X", or "this patch
includes updates for subsystem X. Please apply."
The maintainer will thank you if you write your patch description in a
form which can be easily pulled into Linux's source code management
system, git, as a "commit log". See #15, below.
If your description starts to get long, that's a sign that you probably
need to split up your patch. See #3, next.
@ -183,8 +187,9 @@ Even if the maintainer did not respond in step #4, make sure to ALWAYS
copy the maintainer when you change their code.
For small patches you may want to CC the Trivial Patch Monkey
trivial@kernel.org managed by Jesper Juhl; which collects "trivial"
patches. Trivial patches must qualify for one of the following rules:
trivial@kernel.org which collects "trivial" patches. Have a look
into the MAINTAINERS file for its current manager.
Trivial patches must qualify for one of the following rules:
Spelling fixes in documentation
Spelling fixes which could break grep(1)
Warning fixes (cluttering with useless warnings is bad)
@ -196,7 +201,6 @@ patches. Trivial patches must qualify for one of the following rules:
since people copy, as long as it's trivial)
Any fix by the author/maintainer of the file (ie. patch monkey
in re-transmission mode)
URL: <http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/juhl/trivial/>
@ -405,7 +409,14 @@ person it names. This tag documents that potentially interested parties
have been included in the discussion
14) Using Tested-by: and Reviewed-by:
14) Using Reported-by:, Tested-by: and Reviewed-by:
If this patch fixes a problem reported by somebody else, consider adding a
Reported-by: tag to credit the reporter for their contribution. Please
note that this tag should not be added without the reporter's permission,
especially if the problem was not reported in a public forum. That said,
if we diligently credit our bug reporters, they will, hopefully, be
inspired to help us again in the future.
A Tested-by: tag indicates that the patch has been successfully tested (in
some environment) by the person named. This tag informs maintainers that
@ -444,7 +455,7 @@ offer a Reviewed-by tag for a patch. This tag serves to give credit to
reviewers and to inform maintainers of the degree of review which has been
done on the patch. Reviewed-by: tags, when supplied by reviewers known to
understand the subject area and to perform thorough reviews, will normally
increase the liklihood of your patch getting into the kernel.
increase the likelihood of your patch getting into the kernel.
15) The canonical patch format
@ -485,12 +496,33 @@ phrase" should not be a filename. Do not use the same "summary
phrase" for every patch in a whole patch series (where a "patch
series" is an ordered sequence of multiple, related patches).
Bear in mind that the "summary phrase" of your email becomes
a globally-unique identifier for that patch. It propagates
all the way into the git changelog. The "summary phrase" may
later be used in developer discussions which refer to the patch.
People will want to google for the "summary phrase" to read
discussion regarding that patch.
Bear in mind that the "summary phrase" of your email becomes a
globally-unique identifier for that patch. It propagates all the way
into the git changelog. The "summary phrase" may later be used in
developer discussions which refer to the patch. People will want to
google for the "summary phrase" to read discussion regarding that
patch. It will also be the only thing that people may quickly see
when, two or three months later, they are going through perhaps
thousands of patches using tools such as "gitk" or "git log
--oneline".
For these reasons, the "summary" must be no more than 70-75
characters, and it must describe both what the patch changes, as well
as why the patch might be necessary. It is challenging to be both
succinct and descriptive, but that is what a well-written summary
should do.
The "summary phrase" may be prefixed by tags enclosed in square
brackets: "Subject: [PATCH tag] <summary phrase>". The tags are not
considered part of the summary phrase, but describe how the patch
should be treated. Common tags might include a version descriptor if
the multiple versions of the patch have been sent out in response to
comments (i.e., "v1, v2, v3"), or "RFC" to indicate a request for
comments. If there are four patches in a patch series the individual
patches may be numbered like this: 1/4, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4. This assures
that developers understand the order in which the patches should be
applied and that they have reviewed or applied all of the patches in
the patch series.
A couple of example Subjects:
@ -510,19 +542,31 @@ the patch author in the changelog.
The explanation body will be committed to the permanent source
changelog, so should make sense to a competent reader who has long
since forgotten the immediate details of the discussion that might
have led to this patch.
have led to this patch. Including symptoms of the failure which the
patch addresses (kernel log messages, oops messages, etc.) is
especially useful for people who might be searching the commit logs
looking for the applicable patch. If a patch fixes a compile failure,
it may not be necessary to include _all_ of the compile failures; just
enough that it is likely that someone searching for the patch can find
it. As in the "summary phrase", it is important to be both succinct as
well as descriptive.
The "---" marker line serves the essential purpose of marking for patch
handling tools where the changelog message ends.
One good use for the additional comments after the "---" marker is for
a diffstat, to show what files have changed, and the number of inserted
and deleted lines per file. A diffstat is especially useful on bigger
patches. Other comments relevant only to the moment or the maintainer,
not suitable for the permanent changelog, should also go here.
Use diffstat options "-p 1 -w 70" so that filenames are listed from the
top of the kernel source tree and don't use too much horizontal space
(easily fit in 80 columns, maybe with some indentation).
a diffstat, to show what files have changed, and the number of
inserted and deleted lines per file. A diffstat is especially useful
on bigger patches. Other comments relevant only to the moment or the
maintainer, not suitable for the permanent changelog, should also go
here. A good example of such comments might be "patch changelogs"
which describe what has changed between the v1 and v2 version of the
patch.
If you are going to include a diffstat after the "---" marker, please
use diffstat options "-p 1 -w 70" so that filenames are listed from
the top of the kernel source tree and don't use too much horizontal
space (easily fit in 80 columns, maybe with some indentation).
See more details on the proper patch format in the following
references.

10
Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/GPIO.txt

@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ PIN Numbers
-----------
Each pin has an unique number associated with it in regs-gpio.h,
eg S3C2410_GPA0 or S3C2410_GPF1. These defines are used to tell
eg S3C2410_GPA(0) or S3C2410_GPF(1). These defines are used to tell
the GPIO functions which pin is to be used.
@ -65,11 +65,11 @@ Configuring a pin
Eg:
s3c2410_gpio_cfgpin(S3C2410_GPA0, S3C2410_GPA0_ADDR0);
s3c2410_gpio_cfgpin(S3C2410_GPE8, S3C2410_GPE8_SDDAT1);
s3c2410_gpio_cfgpin(S3C2410_GPA(0), S3C2410_GPA0_ADDR0);
s3c2410_gpio_cfgpin(S3C2410_GPE(8), S3C2410_GPE8_SDDAT1);
which would turn GPA0 into the lowest Address line A0, and set
GPE8 to be connected to the SDIO/MMC controller's SDDAT1 line.
which would turn GPA(0) into the lowest Address line A0, and set
GPE(8) to be connected to the SDIO/MMC controller's SDDAT1 line.
Reading the current configuration

2
Documentation/block/biodoc.txt

@ -186,7 +186,7 @@ a virtual address mapping (unlike the earlier scheme of virtual address
do not have a corresponding kernel virtual address space mapping) and
low-memory pages.
Note: Please refer to Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt for a discussion
Note: Please refer to Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt for a discussion
on PCI high mem DMA aspects and mapping of scatter gather lists, and support
for 64 bit PCI.

2
Documentation/block/deadline-iosched.txt

@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ same criteria as reads.
front_merges (bool)
------------
Sometimes it happens that a request enters the io scheduler that is contigious
Sometimes it happens that a request enters the io scheduler that is contiguous
with a request that is already on the queue. Either it fits in the back of that
request, or it fits at the front. That is called either a back merge candidate
or a front merge candidate. Due to the way files are typically laid out,

2
Documentation/braille-console.txt

@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ parameter.
For simplicity, only one braille console can be enabled, other uses of
console=brl,... will be discarded. Also note that it does not interfere with
the console selection mecanism described in serial-console.txt
the console selection mechanism described in serial-console.txt
For now, only the VisioBraille device is supported.

4
Documentation/dell_rbu.txt

@ -76,9 +76,9 @@ Do the steps below to download the BIOS image.
The /sys/class/firmware/dell_rbu/ entries will remain till the following is
done.
echo -1 > /sys/class/firmware/dell_rbu/loading.
echo -1 > /sys/class/firmware/dell_rbu/loading
Until this step is completed the driver cannot be unloaded.
Also echoing either mono ,packet or init in to image_type will free up the
Also echoing either mono, packet or init in to image_type will free up the
memory allocated by the driver.
If a user by accident executes steps 1 and 3 above without executing step 2;

31
Documentation/development-process/5.Posting

@ -119,7 +119,7 @@ which takes quite a bit of time and thought after the "real work" has been
done. When done properly, though, it is time well spent.
5.4: PATCH FORMATTING
5.4: PATCH FORMATTING AND CHANGELOGS
So now you have a perfect series of patches for posting, but the work is
not done quite yet. Each patch needs to be formatted into a message which
@ -146,8 +146,33 @@ that end, each patch will be composed of the following:
- One or more tag lines, with, at a minimum, one Signed-off-by: line from
the author of the patch. Tags will be described in more detail below.
The above three items should, normally, be the text used when committing
the change to a revision control system. They are followed by:
The items above, together, form the changelog for the patch. Writing good
changelogs is a crucial but often-neglected art; it's worth spending
another moment discussing this issue. When writing a changelog, you should
bear in mind that a number of different people will be reading your words.
These include subsystem maintainers and reviewers who need to decide
whether the patch should be included, distributors and other maintainers
trying to decide whether a patch should be backported to other kernels, bug
hunters wondering whether the patch is responsible for a problem they are
chasing, users who want to know how the kernel has changed, and more. A
good changelog conveys the needed information to all of these people in the
most direct and concise way possible.
To that end, the summary line should describe the effects of and motivation
for the change as well as possible given the one-line constraint. The
detailed description can then amplify on those topics and provide any
needed additional information. If the patch fixes a bug, cite the commit
which introduced the bug if possible. If a problem is associated with
specific log or compiler output, include that output to help others
searching for a solution to the same problem. If the change is meant to
support other changes coming in later patch, say so. If internal APIs are
changed, detail those changes and how other developers should respond. In
general, the more you can put yourself into the shoes of everybody who will
be reading your changelog, the better that changelog (and the kernel as a
whole) will be.
Needless to say, the changelog should be the text used when committing the
change to a revision control system. It will be followed by:
- The patch itself, in the unified ("-u") patch format. Using the "-p"
option to diff will associate function names with changes, making the

2
Documentation/driver-model/devres.txt

@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ For example, you can do something like the following.
void my_midlayer_destroy_something()
{
devres_release_group(dev, my_midlayer_create_soemthing);
devres_release_group(dev, my_midlayer_create_something);
}

8
Documentation/edac.txt

@ -23,8 +23,8 @@ first time, it was renamed to 'EDAC'.
The bluesmoke project at sourceforge.net is now utilized as a 'staging area'
for EDAC development, before it is sent upstream to kernel.org
At the bluesmoke/EDAC project site, is a series of quilt patches against
recent kernels, stored in a SVN respository. For easier downloading, there
At the bluesmoke/EDAC project site is a series of quilt patches against
recent kernels, stored in a SVN repository. For easier downloading, there
is also a tarball snapshot available.
============================================================================
@ -73,9 +73,9 @@ the vendor should tie the parity status bits to 0 if they do not intend
to generate parity. Some vendors do not do this, and thus the parity bit
can "float" giving false positives.
In the kernel there is a pci device attribute located in sysfs that is
In the kernel there is a PCI device attribute located in sysfs that is
checked by the EDAC PCI scanning code. If that attribute is set,
PCI parity/error scannining is skipped for that device. The attribute
PCI parity/error scanning is skipped for that device. The attribute
is:
broken_parity_status

2
Documentation/fb/sh7760fb.txt

@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
SH7760/SH7763 integrated LCDC Framebuffer driver
================================================
0. Overwiew
0. Overview
-----------
The SH7760/SH7763 have an integrated LCD Display controller (LCDC) which
supports (in theory) resolutions ranging from 1x1 to 1024x1024,

10
Documentation/feature-removal-schedule.txt

@ -444,3 +444,13 @@ What: CONFIG_RFKILL_INPUT
When: 2.6.33
Why: Should be implemented in userspace, policy daemon.
Who: Johannes Berg <johannes@sipsolutions.net>
----------------------------
What: CONFIG_X86_OLD_MCE
When: 2.6.32
Why: Remove the old legacy 32bit machine check code. This has been
superseded by the newer machine check code from the 64bit port,
but the old version has been kept around for easier testing. Note this
doesn't impact the old P5 and WinChip machine check handlers.
Who: Andi Kleen <andi@firstfloor.org>

2
Documentation/filesystems/autofs4-mount-control.txt

@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ The call requires an initialized struct autofs_dev_ioctl. There are two
possible variations. Both use the path field set to the path of the mount
point to check and the size field adjusted appropriately. One uses the
ioctlfd field to identify a specific mount point to check while the other
variation uses the path and optionaly arg1 set to an autofs mount type.
variation uses the path and optionally arg1 set to an autofs mount type.
The call returns 1 if this is a mount point and sets arg1 to the device
number of the mount and field arg2 to the relevant super block magic
number (described below) or 0 if it isn't a mountpoint. In both cases

2
Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt

@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ This has the following fields:
have index children.
If this function is not supplied or if it returns NULL then the first
cache in the parent's list will be chosed, or failing that, the first
cache in the parent's list will be chosen, or failing that, the first
cache in the master list.
(4) A function to retrieve an object's key from the netfs [mandatory].

158
Documentation/filesystems/debugfs.txt

@ -0,0 +1,158 @@
Copyright 2009 Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Debugfs exists as a simple way for kernel developers to make information
available to user space. Unlike /proc, which is only meant for information
about a process, or sysfs, which has strict one-value-per-file rules,
debugfs has no rules at all. Developers can put any information they want
there. The debugfs filesystem is also intended to not serve as a stable
ABI to user space; in theory, there are no stability constraints placed on
files exported there. The real world is not always so simple, though [1];
even debugfs interfaces are best designed with the idea that they will need
to be maintained forever.
Debugfs is typically mounted with a command like:
mount -t debugfs none /sys/kernel/debug
(Or an equivalent /etc/fstab line).
Note that the debugfs API is exported GPL-only to modules.
Code using debugfs should include <linux/debugfs.h>. Then, the first order
of business will be to create at least one directory to hold a set of
debugfs files:
struct dentry *debugfs_create_dir(const char *name, struct dentry *parent);
This call, if successful, will make a directory called name underneath the
indicated parent directory. If parent is NULL, the directory will be
created in the debugfs root. On success, the return value is a struct
dentry pointer which can be used to create files in the directory (and to
clean it up at the end). A NULL return value indicates that something went
wrong. If ERR_PTR(-ENODEV) is returned, that is an indication that the
kernel has been built without debugfs support and none of the functions
described below will work.
The most general way to create a file within a debugfs directory is with:
struct dentry *debugfs_create_file(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, void *data,
const struct file_operations *fops);
Here, name is the name of the file to create, mode describes the access
permissions the file should have, parent indicates the directory which
should hold the file, data will be stored in the i_private field of the
resulting inode structure, and fops is a set of file operations which
implement the file's behavior. At a minimum, the read() and/or write()
operations should be provided; others can be included as needed. Again,
the return value will be a dentry pointer to the created file, NULL for
error, or ERR_PTR(-ENODEV) if debugfs support is missing.
In a number of cases, the creation of a set of file operations is not
actually necessary; the debugfs code provides a number of helper functions
for simple situations. Files containing a single integer value can be
created with any of:
struct dentry *debugfs_create_u8(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u8 *value);
struct dentry *debugfs_create_u16(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u16 *value);
struct dentry *debugfs_create_u32(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u32 *value);
struct dentry *debugfs_create_u64(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u64 *value);
These files support both reading and writing the given value; if a specific
file should not be written to, simply set the mode bits accordingly. The
values in these files are in decimal; if hexadecimal is more appropriate,
the following functions can be used instead:
struct dentry *debugfs_create_x8(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u8 *value);
struct dentry *debugfs_create_x16(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u16 *value);
struct dentry *debugfs_create_x32(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u32 *value);
Note that there is no debugfs_create_x64().
These functions are useful as long as the developer knows the size of the
value to be exported. Some types can have different widths on different
architectures, though, complicating the situation somewhat. There is a
function meant to help out in one special case:
struct dentry *debugfs_create_size_t(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent,
size_t *value);
As might be expected, this function will create a debugfs file to represent
a variable of type size_t.
Boolean values can be placed in debugfs with:
struct dentry *debugfs_create_bool(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent, u32 *value);
A read on the resulting file will yield either Y (for non-zero values) or
N, followed by a newline. If written to, it will accept either upper- or
lower-case values, or 1 or 0. Any other input will be silently ignored.
Finally, a block of arbitrary binary data can be exported with:
struct debugfs_blob_wrapper {
void *data;
unsigned long size;
};
struct dentry *debugfs_create_blob(const char *name, mode_t mode,
struct dentry *parent,
struct debugfs_blob_wrapper *blob);
A read of this file will return the data pointed to by the
debugfs_blob_wrapper structure. Some drivers use "blobs" as a simple way
to return several lines of (static) formatted text output. This function
can be used to export binary information, but there does not appear to be
any code which does so in the mainline. Note that all files created with
debugfs_create_blob() are read-only.
There are a couple of other directory-oriented helper functions:
struct dentry *debugfs_rename(struct dentry *old_dir,
struct dentry *old_dentry,
struct dentry *new_dir,
const char *new_name);
struct dentry *debugfs_create_symlink(const char *name,
struct dentry *parent,
const char *target);
A call to debugfs_rename() will give a new name to an existing debugfs
file, possibly in a different directory. The new_name must not exist prior
to the call; the return value is old_dentry with updated information.
Symbolic links can be created with debugfs_create_symlink().
There is one important thing that all debugfs users must take into account:
there is no automatic cleanup of any directories created in debugfs. If a
module is unloaded without explicitly removing debugfs entries, the result
will be a lot of stale pointers and no end of highly antisocial behavior.
So all debugfs users - at least those which can be built as modules - must
be prepared to remove all files and directories they create there. A file
can be removed with:
void debugfs_remove(struct dentry *dentry);
The dentry value can be NULL, in which case nothing will be removed.
Once upon a time, debugfs users were required to remember the dentry
pointer for every debugfs file they created so that all files could be
cleaned up. We live in more civilized times now, though, and debugfs users
can call:
void debugfs_remove_recursive(struct dentry *dentry);
If this function is passed a pointer for the dentry corresponding to the
top-level directory, the entire hierarchy below that directory will be
removed.
Notes:
[1] http://lwn.net/Articles/309298/

6
Documentation/filesystems/ext4.txt

@ -294,7 +294,7 @@ max_batch_time=usec Maximum amount of time ext4 should wait for
amount of time (on average) that it takes to
finish committing a transaction. Call this time
the "commit time". If the time that the
transactoin has been running is less than the
transaction has been running is less than the
commit time, ext4 will try sleeping for the
commit time to see if other operations will join
the transaction. The commit time is capped by
@ -328,7 +328,7 @@ noauto_da_alloc replacing existing files via patterns such as
journal commit, in the default data=ordered
mode, the data blocks of the new file are forced
to disk before the rename() operation is
commited. This provides roughly the same level
committed. This provides roughly the same level
of guarantees as ext3, and avoids the
"zero-length" problem that can happen when a
system crashes before the delayed allocation
@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ written to the journal first, and then to its final location.
In the event of a crash, the journal can be replayed, bringing both data and
metadata into a consistent state. This mode is the slowest except when data
needs to be read from and written to disk at the same time where it
outperforms all others modes. Curently ext4 does not have delayed
outperforms all others modes. Currently ext4 does not have delayed
allocation support if this data journalling mode is selected.
References

2
Documentation/filesystems/fiemap.txt

@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ fiemap_check_flags() helper:
int fiemap_check_flags(struct fiemap_extent_info *fieinfo, u32 fs_flags);
The struct fieinfo should be passed in as recieved from ioctl_fiemap(). The
The struct fieinfo should be passed in as received from ioctl_fiemap(). The
set of fiemap flags which the fs understands should be passed via fs_flags. If
fiemap_check_flags finds invalid user flags, it will place the bad values in
fieinfo->fi_flags and return -EBADR. If the file system gets -EBADR, from

2
Documentation/filesystems/gfs2-glocks.txt

@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ go_lock | Called for the first local holder of a lock
go_unlock | Called on the final local unlock of a lock
go_dump | Called to print content of object for debugfs file, or on
| error to dump glock to the log.
go_type; | The type of the glock, LM_TYPE_.....
go_type | The type of the glock, LM_TYPE_.....
go_min_hold_time | The minimum hold time
The minimum hold time for each lock is the time after a remote lock

19
Documentation/filesystems/gfs2.txt

@ -11,18 +11,15 @@ their I/O so file system consistency is maintained. One of the nifty
features of GFS is perfect consistency -- changes made to the file system
on one machine show up immediately on all other machines in the cluster.
GFS uses interchangable inter-node locking mechanisms. Different lock
modules can plug into GFS and each file system selects the appropriate
lock module at mount time. Lock modules include:
GFS uses interchangable inter-node locking mechanisms, the currently
supported mechanisms are:
lock_nolock -- allows gfs to be used as a local file system
lock_dlm -- uses a distributed lock manager (dlm) for inter-node locking
The dlm is found at linux/fs/dlm/
In addition to interfacing with an external locking manager, a gfs lock
module is responsible for interacting with external cluster management
systems. Lock_dlm depends on user space cluster management systems found
Lock_dlm depends on user space cluster management systems found
at the URL above.
To use gfs as a local file system, no external clustering systems are
@ -31,13 +28,19 @@ needed, simply:
$ mkfs -t gfs2 -p lock_nolock -j 1 /dev/block_device
$ mount -t gfs2 /dev/block_device /dir
GFS2 is not on-disk compatible with previous versions of GFS.
If you are using Fedora, you need to install the gfs2-utils package
and, for lock_dlm, you will also need to install the cman package
and write a cluster.conf as per the documentation.
GFS2 is not on-disk compatible with previous versions of GFS, but it
is pretty close.
The following man pages can be found at the URL above:
gfs2_fsck to repair a filesystem
fsck.gfs2 to repair a filesystem
gfs2_grow to expand a filesystem online
gfs2_jadd to add journals to a filesystem online
gfs2_tool to manipulate, examine and tune a filesystem
gfs2_quota to examine and change quota values in a filesystem
gfs2_convert to convert a gfs filesystem to gfs2 in-place
mount.gfs2 to help mount(8) mount a filesystem
<