Browse Source

Merge branch 'master' of master.kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/net-2.6

Conflicts:
	drivers/net/stmmac/stmmac_main.c
	drivers/net/wireless/wl12xx/wl1271_cmd.c
	drivers/net/wireless/wl12xx/wl1271_main.c
	drivers/net/wireless/wl12xx/wl1271_spi.c
	net/core/ethtool.c
	net/mac80211/scan.c
master
David S. Miller 13 years ago
parent
commit
871039f02f
  1. 0
      Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO.txt
  2. 13
      Documentation/DocBook/tracepoint.tmpl
  3. 4
      Documentation/block/biodoc.txt
  4. 2
      Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt
  5. 234
      Documentation/circular-buffers.txt
  6. 1
      Documentation/connector/cn_test.c
  7. 14
      Documentation/fb/efifb.txt
  8. 2
      Documentation/filesystems/00-INDEX
  9. 18
      Documentation/filesystems/9p.txt
  10. 11
      Documentation/filesystems/ceph.txt
  11. 6
      Documentation/filesystems/tmpfs.txt
  12. 20
      Documentation/memory-barriers.txt
  13. 76
      Documentation/networking/timestamping.txt
  14. 54
      Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/qe.txt
  15. 16
      Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt
  16. 6
      Documentation/volatile-considered-harmful.txt
  17. 3
      Documentation/watchdog/src/watchdog-simple.c
  18. 8
      Documentation/watchdog/src/watchdog-test.c
  19. 5
      Documentation/watchdog/watchdog-api.txt
  20. 65
      MAINTAINERS
  21. 2
      Makefile
  22. 1
      arch/alpha/boot/bootp.c
  23. 1
      arch/alpha/boot/bootpz.c
  24. 1
      arch/alpha/boot/main.c
  25. 1
      arch/alpha/boot/misc.c
  26. 1
      arch/alpha/kernel/irq.c
  27. 2
      arch/alpha/kernel/osf_sys.c
  28. 1
      arch/alpha/kernel/pci-noop.c
  29. 1
      arch/alpha/kernel/pci-sysfs.c
  30. 2
      arch/alpha/kernel/pci_iommu.c
  31. 2
      arch/alpha/kernel/process.c
  32. 1
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  33. 1
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  34. 1
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  35. 1
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  36. 1
      arch/alpha/mm/init.c
  37. 1
      arch/arm/common/clkdev.c
  38. 1
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  39. 10
      arch/arm/common/locomo.c
  40. 38
      arch/arm/include/asm/cacheflush.h
  41. 1
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  42. 1
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  43. 75
      arch/arm/include/asm/outercache.h
  44. 16
      arch/arm/include/asm/system.h
  45. 1
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  46. 11
      arch/arm/kernel/kprobes.c
  47. 2
      arch/arm/kernel/module.c
  48. 1
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  49. 2
      arch/arm/kernel/sys_arm.c
  50. 4
      arch/arm/lib/memmove.S
  51. 1
      arch/arm/lib/uaccess_with_memcpy.c
  52. 1
      arch/arm/mach-aaec2000/core.c
  53. 1
      arch/arm/mach-bcmring/dma.c
  54. 1
      arch/arm/mach-davinci/board-dm365-evm.c
  55. 1
      arch/arm/mach-davinci/dm365.c
  56. 4
      arch/arm/mach-davinci/dma.c
  57. 8
      arch/arm/mach-davinci/include/mach/da8xx.h
  58. 6
      arch/arm/mach-davinci/time.c
  59. 1
      arch/arm/mach-h720x/common.c
  60. 1
      arch/arm/mach-integrator/cpu.c
  61. 1
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  62. 2
      arch/arm/mach-integrator/integrator_cp.c
  63. 1
      arch/arm/mach-integrator/pci_v3.c
  64. 1
      arch/arm/mach-iop13xx/pci.c
  65. 1
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  66. 1
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  67. 1
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  68. 1
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  69. 1
      arch/arm/mach-iop33x/iq80331.c
  70. 1
      arch/arm/mach-iop33x/iq80332.c
  71. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp2000/enp2611.c
  72. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp2000/ixdp2400.c
  73. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp2000/ixdp2800.c
  74. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp2000/ixdp2x00.c
  75. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp2000/ixdp2x01.c
  76. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp2000/pci.c
  77. 2
      arch/arm/mach-ixp23xx/include/mach/memory.h
  78. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp23xx/pci.c
  79. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp4xx/avila-setup.c
  80. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp4xx/coyote-setup.c
  81. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp4xx/gateway7001-setup.c
  82. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp4xx/gtwx5715-setup.c
  83. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp4xx/ixdp425-setup.c
  84. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp4xx/ixp4xx_npe.c
  85. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ixp4xx/wg302v2-setup.c
  86. 4
      arch/arm/mach-kirkwood/mv88f6281gtw_ge-setup.c
  87. 1
      arch/arm/mach-kirkwood/pcie.c
  88. 1
      arch/arm/mach-lh7a40x/clcd.c
  89. 5
      arch/arm/mach-mmp/include/mach/uncompress.h
  90. 1
      arch/arm/mach-mx3/mach-mx31moboard.c
  91. 1
      arch/arm/mach-mx3/mach-pcm037.c
  92. 1
      arch/arm/mach-mx3/mx31moboard-devboard.c
  93. 1
      arch/arm/mach-mx3/mx31moboard-marxbot.c
  94. 1
      arch/arm/mach-netx/fb.c
  95. 1
      arch/arm/mach-netx/xc.c
  96. 1
      arch/arm/mach-nomadik/gpio.c
  97. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ns9xxx/plat-serial8250.c
  98. 1
      arch/arm/mach-ns9xxx/processor-ns9360.c
  99. 1
      arch/arm/mach-omap1/mcbsp.c
  100. 1
      arch/arm/mach-omap2/clkt2xxx_virt_prcm_set.c
  101. Some files were not shown because too many files have changed in this diff Show More

0
Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt → Documentation/DMA-API-HOWTO.txt

13
Documentation/DocBook/tracepoint.tmpl

@ -16,6 +16,15 @@
</address>
</affiliation>
</author>
<author>
<firstname>William</firstname>
<surname>Cohen</surname>
<affiliation>
<address>
<email>wcohen@redhat.com</email>
</address>
</affiliation>
</author>
</authorgroup>
<legalnotice>
@ -91,4 +100,8 @@
!Iinclude/trace/events/signal.h
</chapter>
<chapter id="block">
<title>Block IO</title>
!Iinclude/trace/events/block.h
</chapter>
</book>

4
Documentation/block/biodoc.txt

@ -1162,8 +1162,8 @@ where a driver received a request ala this before:
As mentioned, there is no virtual mapping of a bio. For DMA, this is
not a problem as the driver probably never will need a virtual mapping.
Instead it needs a bus mapping (pci_map_page for a single segment or
use blk_rq_map_sg for scatter gather) to be able to ship it to the driver. For
Instead it needs a bus mapping (dma_map_page for a single segment or
use dma_map_sg for scatter gather) to be able to ship it to the driver. For
PIO drivers (or drivers that need to revert to PIO transfer once in a
while (IDE for example)), where the CPU is doing the actual data
transfer a virtual mapping is needed. If the driver supports highmem I/O,

2
Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt

@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ Note:
5.3 swappiness
Similar to /proc/sys/vm/swappiness, but affecting a hierarchy of groups only.
Following cgroups' swapiness can't be changed.
Following cgroups' swappiness can't be changed.
- root cgroup (uses /proc/sys/vm/swappiness).
- a cgroup which uses hierarchy and it has child cgroup.
- a cgroup which uses hierarchy and not the root of hierarchy.

234
Documentation/circular-buffers.txt

@ -0,0 +1,234 @@
================
CIRCULAR BUFFERS
================
By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Linux provides a number of features that can be used to implement circular
buffering. There are two sets of such features:
(1) Convenience functions for determining information about power-of-2 sized
buffers.
(2) Memory barriers for when the producer and the consumer of objects in the
buffer don't want to share a lock.
To use these facilities, as discussed below, there needs to be just one
producer and just one consumer. It is possible to handle multiple producers by
serialising them, and to handle multiple consumers by serialising them.
Contents:
(*) What is a circular buffer?
(*) Measuring power-of-2 buffers.
(*) Using memory barriers with circular buffers.
- The producer.
- The consumer.
==========================
WHAT IS A CIRCULAR BUFFER?
==========================
First of all, what is a circular buffer? A circular buffer is a buffer of
fixed, finite size into which there are two indices:
(1) A 'head' index - the point at which the producer inserts items into the
buffer.
(2) A 'tail' index - the point at which the consumer finds the next item in
the buffer.
Typically when the tail pointer is equal to the head pointer, the buffer is
empty; and the buffer is full when the head pointer is one less than the tail
pointer.
The head index is incremented when items are added, and the tail index when
items are removed. The tail index should never jump the head index, and both
indices should be wrapped to 0 when they reach the end of the buffer, thus
allowing an infinite amount of data to flow through the buffer.
Typically, items will all be of the same unit size, but this isn't strictly
required to use the techniques below. The indices can be increased by more
than 1 if multiple items or variable-sized items are to be included in the
buffer, provided that neither index overtakes the other. The implementer must
be careful, however, as a region more than one unit in size may wrap the end of
the buffer and be broken into two segments.
============================
MEASURING POWER-OF-2 BUFFERS
============================
Calculation of the occupancy or the remaining capacity of an arbitrarily sized
circular buffer would normally be a slow operation, requiring the use of a
modulus (divide) instruction. However, if the buffer is of a power-of-2 size,
then a much quicker bitwise-AND instruction can be used instead.
Linux provides a set of macros for handling power-of-2 circular buffers. These
can be made use of by:
#include <linux/circ_buf.h>
The macros are:
(*) Measure the remaining capacity of a buffer:
CIRC_SPACE(head_index, tail_index, buffer_size);
This returns the amount of space left in the buffer[1] into which items
can be inserted.
(*) Measure the maximum consecutive immediate space in a buffer:
CIRC_SPACE_TO_END(head_index, tail_index, buffer_size);
This returns the amount of consecutive space left in the buffer[1] into
which items can be immediately inserted without having to wrap back to the
beginning of the buffer.
(*) Measure the occupancy of a buffer:
CIRC_CNT(head_index, tail_index, buffer_size);
This returns the number of items currently occupying a buffer[2].
(*) Measure the non-wrapping occupancy of a buffer:
CIRC_CNT_TO_END(head_index, tail_index, buffer_size);
This returns the number of consecutive items[2] that can be extracted from
the buffer without having to wrap back to the beginning of the buffer.
Each of these macros will nominally return a value between 0 and buffer_size-1,
however:
[1] CIRC_SPACE*() are intended to be used in the producer. To the producer
they will return a lower bound as the producer controls the head index,
but the consumer may still be depleting the buffer on another CPU and
moving the tail index.
To the consumer it will show an upper bound as the producer may be busy
depleting the space.
[2] CIRC_CNT*() are intended to be used in the consumer. To the consumer they
will return a lower bound as the consumer controls the tail index, but the
producer may still be filling the buffer on another CPU and moving the
head index.
To the producer it will show an upper bound as the consumer may be busy
emptying the buffer.
[3] To a third party, the order in which the writes to the indices by the
producer and consumer become visible cannot be guaranteed as they are
independent and may be made on different CPUs - so the result in such a
situation will merely be a guess, and may even be negative.
===========================================
USING MEMORY BARRIERS WITH CIRCULAR BUFFERS
===========================================
By using memory barriers in conjunction with circular buffers, you can avoid
the need to:
(1) use a single lock to govern access to both ends of the buffer, thus
allowing the buffer to be filled and emptied at the same time; and
(2) use atomic counter operations.
There are two sides to this: the producer that fills the buffer, and the
consumer that empties it. Only one thing should be filling a buffer at any one
time, and only one thing should be emptying a buffer at any one time, but the
two sides can operate simultaneously.
THE PRODUCER
------------
The producer will look something like this:
spin_lock(&producer_lock);
unsigned long head = buffer->head;
unsigned long tail = ACCESS_ONCE(buffer->tail);
if (CIRC_SPACE(head, tail, buffer->size) >= 1) {
/* insert one item into the buffer */
struct item *item = buffer[head];
produce_item(item);
smp_wmb(); /* commit the item before incrementing the head */
buffer->head = (head + 1) & (buffer->size - 1);
/* wake_up() will make sure that the head is committed before
* waking anyone up */
wake_up(consumer);
}
spin_unlock(&producer_lock);
This will instruct the CPU that the contents of the new item must be written
before the head index makes it available to the consumer and then instructs the
CPU that the revised head index must be written before the consumer is woken.
Note that wake_up() doesn't have to be the exact mechanism used, but whatever
is used must guarantee a (write) memory barrier between the update of the head
index and the change of state of the consumer, if a change of state occurs.
THE CONSUMER
------------
The consumer will look something like this:
spin_lock(&consumer_lock);
unsigned long head = ACCESS_ONCE(buffer->head);
unsigned long tail = buffer->tail;
if (CIRC_CNT(head, tail, buffer->size) >= 1) {
/* read index before reading contents at that index */
smp_read_barrier_depends();
/* extract one item from the buffer */
struct item *item = buffer[tail];
consume_item(item);
smp_mb(); /* finish reading descriptor before incrementing tail */
buffer->tail = (tail + 1) & (buffer->size - 1);
}
spin_unlock(&consumer_lock);
This will instruct the CPU to make sure the index is up to date before reading
the new item, and then it shall make sure the CPU has finished reading the item
before it writes the new tail pointer, which will erase the item.
Note the use of ACCESS_ONCE() in both algorithms to read the opposition index.
This prevents the compiler from discarding and reloading its cached value -
which some compilers will do across smp_read_barrier_depends(). This isn't
strictly needed if you can be sure that the opposition index will _only_ be
used the once.
===============
FURTHER READING
===============
See also Documentation/memory-barriers.txt for a description of Linux's memory
barrier facilities.

1
Documentation/connector/cn_test.c

@ -25,6 +25,7 @@
#include <linux/module.h>
#include <linux/moduleparam.h>
#include <linux/skbuff.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/timer.h>
#include <linux/connector.h>

14
Documentation/fb/imacfb.txt → Documentation/fb/efifb.txt

@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
What is imacfb?
What is efifb?
===============
This is a generic EFI platform driver for Intel based Apple computers.
Imacfb is only for EFI booted Intel Macs.
efifb is only for EFI booted Intel Macs.
Supported Hardware
==================
@ -16,16 +16,16 @@ MacMini
How to use it?
==============
Imacfb does not have any kind of autodetection of your machine.
efifb does not have any kind of autodetection of your machine.
You have to add the following kernel parameters in your elilo.conf:
Macbook :
video=imacfb:macbook
video=efifb:macbook
MacMini :
video=imacfb:mini
video=efifb:mini
Macbook Pro 15", iMac 17" :
video=imacfb:i17
video=efifb:i17
Macbook Pro 17", iMac 20" :
video=imacfb:i20
video=efifb:i20
--
Edgar Hucek <gimli@dark-green.com>

2
Documentation/filesystems/00-INDEX

@ -16,6 +16,8 @@ befs.txt
- information about the BeOS filesystem for Linux.
bfs.txt
- info for the SCO UnixWare Boot Filesystem (BFS).
ceph.txt
- info for the Ceph Distributed File System
cifs.txt
- description of the CIFS filesystem.
coda.txt

18
Documentation/filesystems/9p.txt

@ -37,6 +37,15 @@ For Plan 9 From User Space applications (http://swtch.com/plan9)
mount -t 9p `namespace`/acme /mnt/9 -o trans=unix,uname=$USER
For server running on QEMU host with virtio transport:
mount -t 9p -o trans=virtio <mount_tag> /mnt/9
where mount_tag is the tag associated by the server to each of the exported
mount points. Each 9P export is seen by the client as a virtio device with an
associated "mount_tag" property. Available mount tags can be
seen by reading /sys/bus/virtio/drivers/9pnet_virtio/virtio<n>/mount_tag files.
OPTIONS
=======
@ -47,7 +56,7 @@ OPTIONS
fd - used passed file descriptors for connection
(see rfdno and wfdno)
virtio - connect to the next virtio channel available
(from lguest or KVM with trans_virtio module)
(from QEMU with trans_virtio module)
rdma - connect to a specified RDMA channel
uname=name user name to attempt mount as on the remote server. The
@ -85,7 +94,12 @@ OPTIONS
port=n port to connect to on the remote server
noextend force legacy mode (no 9p2000.u semantics)
noextend force legacy mode (no 9p2000.u or 9p2000.L semantics)
version=name Select 9P protocol version. Valid options are:
9p2000 - Legacy mode (same as noextend)
9p2000.u - Use 9P2000.u protocol
9p2000.L - Use 9P2000.L protocol
dfltuid attempt to mount as a particular uid

11
Documentation/filesystems/ceph.txt

@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ Basic features include:
* POSIX semantics
* Seamless scaling from 1 to many thousands of nodes
* High availability and reliability. No single points of failure.
* High availability and reliability. No single point of failure.
* N-way replication of data across storage nodes
* Fast recovery from node failures
* Automatic rebalancing of data on node addition/removal
@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ Mount Options
wsize=X
Specify the maximum write size in bytes. By default there is no
maximu. Ceph will normally size writes based on the file stripe
maximum. Ceph will normally size writes based on the file stripe
size.
rsize=X
@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ Mount Options
number of entries in that directory.
nocrc
Disable CRC32C calculation for data writes. If set, the OSD
Disable CRC32C calculation for data writes. If set, the storage node
must rely on TCP's error correction to detect data corruption
in the data payload.
@ -133,7 +133,8 @@ For more information on Ceph, see the home page at
http://ceph.newdream.net/
The Linux kernel client source tree is available at
git://ceph.newdream.net/linux-ceph-client.git
git://ceph.newdream.net/git/ceph-client.git
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/sage/ceph-client.git
and the source for the full system is at
git://ceph.newdream.net/ceph.git
git://ceph.newdream.net/git/ceph.git

6
Documentation/filesystems/tmpfs.txt

@ -82,11 +82,13 @@ tmpfs has a mount option to set the NUMA memory allocation policy for
all files in that instance (if CONFIG_NUMA is enabled) - which can be
adjusted on the fly via 'mount -o remount ...'
mpol=default prefers to allocate memory from the local node
mpol=default use the process allocation policy
(see set_mempolicy(2))
mpol=prefer:Node prefers to allocate memory from the given Node
mpol=bind:NodeList allocates memory only from nodes in NodeList
mpol=interleave prefers to allocate from each node in turn
mpol=interleave:NodeList allocates from each node of NodeList in turn
mpol=local prefers to allocate memory from the local node
NodeList format is a comma-separated list of decimal numbers and ranges,
a range being two hyphen-separated decimal numbers, the smallest and
@ -134,3 +136,5 @@ Author:
Christoph Rohland <cr@sap.com>, 1.12.01
Updated:
Hugh Dickins, 4 June 2007
Updated:
KOSAKI Motohiro, 16 Mar 2010

20
Documentation/memory-barriers.txt

@ -3,6 +3,7 @@
============================
By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Contents:
@ -60,6 +61,10 @@ Contents:
- And then there's the Alpha.
(*) Example uses.
- Circular buffers.
(*) References.
@ -2226,6 +2231,21 @@ The Alpha defines the Linux kernel's memory barrier model.
See the subsection on "Cache Coherency" above.
============
EXAMPLE USES
============
CIRCULAR BUFFERS
----------------
Memory barriers can be used to implement circular buffering without the need
of a lock to serialise the producer with the consumer. See:
Documentation/circular-buffers.txt
for details.
==========
REFERENCES
==========

76
Documentation/networking/timestamping.txt

@ -41,11 +41,12 @@ SOF_TIMESTAMPING_SOFTWARE: return system time stamp generated in
SOF_TIMESTAMPING_TX/RX determine how time stamps are generated.
SOF_TIMESTAMPING_RAW/SYS determine how they are reported in the
following control message:
struct scm_timestamping {
struct timespec systime;
struct timespec hwtimetrans;
struct timespec hwtimeraw;
};
struct scm_timestamping {
struct timespec systime;
struct timespec hwtimetrans;
struct timespec hwtimeraw;
};
recvmsg() can be used to get this control message for regular incoming
packets. For send time stamps the outgoing packet is looped back to
@ -87,12 +88,13 @@ by the network device and will be empty without that support.
SIOCSHWTSTAMP:
Hardware time stamping must also be initialized for each device driver
that is expected to do hardware time stamping. The parameter is:
that is expected to do hardware time stamping. The parameter is defined in
/include/linux/net_tstamp.h as:
struct hwtstamp_config {
int flags; /* no flags defined right now, must be zero */
int tx_type; /* HWTSTAMP_TX_* */
int rx_filter; /* HWTSTAMP_FILTER_* */
int flags; /* no flags defined right now, must be zero */
int tx_type; /* HWTSTAMP_TX_* */
int rx_filter; /* HWTSTAMP_FILTER_* */
};
Desired behavior is passed into the kernel and to a specific device by
@ -139,42 +141,56 @@ enum {
/* time stamp any incoming packet */
HWTSTAMP_FILTER_ALL,
/* return value: time stamp all packets requested plus some others */
HWTSTAMP_FILTER_SOME,
/* return value: time stamp all packets requested plus some others */
HWTSTAMP_FILTER_SOME,
/* PTP v1, UDP, any kind of event packet */
HWTSTAMP_FILTER_PTP_V1_L4_EVENT,
...
/* for the complete list of values, please check
* the include file /include/linux/net_tstamp.h
*/
};
DEVICE IMPLEMENTATION
A driver which supports hardware time stamping must support the
SIOCSHWTSTAMP ioctl. Time stamps for received packets must be stored
in the skb with skb_hwtstamp_set().
SIOCSHWTSTAMP ioctl and update the supplied struct hwtstamp_config with
the actual values as described in the section on SIOCSHWTSTAMP.
Time stamps for received packets must be stored in the skb. To get a pointer
to the shared time stamp structure of the skb call skb_hwtstamps(). Then
set the time stamps in the structure:
struct skb_shared_hwtstamps {
/* hardware time stamp transformed into duration
* since arbitrary point in time
*/
ktime_t hwtstamp;
ktime_t syststamp; /* hwtstamp transformed to system time base */
};
Time stamps for outgoing packets are to be generated as follows:
- In hard_start_xmit(), check if skb_hwtstamp_check_tx_hardware()
returns non-zero. If yes, then the driver is expected
to do hardware time stamping.
- In hard_start_xmit(), check if skb_tx(skb)->hardware is set no-zero.
If yes, then the driver is expected to do hardware time stamping.
- If this is possible for the skb and requested, then declare
that the driver is doing the time stamping by calling
skb_hwtstamp_tx_in_progress(). A driver not supporting
hardware time stamping doesn't do that. A driver must never
touch sk_buff::tstamp! It is used to store how time stamping
for an outgoing packets is to be done.
that the driver is doing the time stamping by setting the field
skb_tx(skb)->in_progress non-zero. You might want to keep a pointer
to the associated skb for the next step and not free the skb. A driver
not supporting hardware time stamping doesn't do that. A driver must
never touch sk_buff::tstamp! It is used to store software generated
time stamps by the network subsystem.
- As soon as the driver has sent the packet and/or obtained a
hardware time stamp for it, it passes the time stamp back by
calling skb_hwtstamp_tx() with the original skb, the raw
hardware time stamp and a handle to the device (necessary
to convert the hardware time stamp to system time). If obtaining
the hardware time stamp somehow fails, then the driver should
not fall back to software time stamping. The rationale is that
this would occur at a later time in the processing pipeline
than other software time stamping and therefore could lead
to unexpected deltas between time stamps.
- If the driver did not call skb_hwtstamp_tx_in_progress(), then
hardware time stamp. skb_hwtstamp_tx() clones the original skb and
adds the timestamps, therefore the original skb has to be freed now.
If obtaining the hardware time stamp somehow fails, then the driver
should not fall back to software time stamping. The rationale is that
this would occur at a later time in the processing pipeline than other
software time stamping and therefore could lead to unexpected deltas
between time stamps.
- If the driver did not call set skb_tx(skb)->in_progress, then
dev_hard_start_xmit() checks whether software time stamping
is wanted as fallback and potentially generates the time stamp.

54
Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/qe.txt

@ -21,6 +21,15 @@ Required properties:
- fsl,qe-num-snums: define how many serial number(SNUM) the QE can use for the
threads.
Optional properties:
- fsl,firmware-phandle:
Usage: required only if there is no fsl,qe-firmware child node
Value type: <phandle>
Definition: Points to a firmware node (see "QE Firmware Node" below)
that contains the firmware that should be uploaded for this QE.
The compatible property for the firmware node should say,
"fsl,qe-firmware".
Recommended properties
- brg-frequency : the internal clock source frequency for baud-rate
generators in Hz.
@ -59,3 +68,48 @@ Example:
reg = <0 c000>;
};
};
* QE Firmware Node
This node defines a firmware binary that is embedded in the device tree, for
the purpose of passing the firmware from bootloader to the kernel, or from
the hypervisor to the guest.
The firmware node itself contains the firmware binary contents, a compatible
property, and any firmware-specific properties. The node should be placed
inside a QE node that needs it. Doing so eliminates the need for a
fsl,firmware-phandle property. Other QE nodes that need the same firmware
should define an fsl,firmware-phandle property that points to the firmware node
in the first QE node.
The fsl,firmware property can be specified in the DTS (possibly using incbin)
or can be inserted by the boot loader at boot time.
Required properties:
- compatible
Usage: required
Value type: <string>
Definition: A standard property. Specify a string that indicates what
kind of firmware it is. For QE, this should be "fsl,qe-firmware".
- fsl,firmware
Usage: required
Value type: <prop-encoded-array>, encoded as an array of bytes
Definition: A standard property. This property contains the firmware
binary "blob".
Example:
qe1@e0080000 {
compatible = "fsl,qe";
qe_firmware:qe-firmware {
compatible = "fsl,qe-firmware";
fsl,firmware = [0x70 0xcd 0x00 0x00 0x01 0x46 0x45 ...];
};
...
};
qe2@e0090000 {
compatible = "fsl,qe";
fsl,firmware-phandle = <&qe_firmware>;
...
};

16
Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt

@ -119,10 +119,18 @@ the codec slots 0 and 1 no matter what the hardware reports.
Interrupt Handling
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In rare but some cases, the interrupt isn't properly handled as
default. You would notice this by the DMA transfer error reported by
ALSA PCM core, for example. Using MSI might help in such a case.
Pass `enable_msi=1` option for enabling MSI.
HD-audio driver uses MSI as default (if available) since 2.6.33
kernel as MSI works better on some machines, and in general, it's
better for performance. However, Nvidia controllers showed bad
regressions with MSI (especially in a combination with AMD chipset),
thus we disabled MSI for them.
There seem also still other devices that don't work with MSI. If you
see a regression wrt the sound quality (stuttering, etc) or a lock-up
in the recent kernel, try to pass `enable_msi=0` option to disable
MSI. If it works, you can add the known bad device to the blacklist
defined in hda_intel.c. In such a case, please report and give the
patch back to the upstream developer.
HD-AUDIO CODEC

6
Documentation/volatile-considered-harmful.txt

@ -63,9 +63,9 @@ way to perform a busy wait is:
cpu_relax();
The cpu_relax() call can lower CPU power consumption or yield to a
hyperthreaded twin processor; it also happens to serve as a memory barrier,
so, once again, volatile is unnecessary. Of course, busy-waiting is
generally an anti-social act to begin with.
hyperthreaded twin processor; it also happens to serve as a compiler
barrier, so, once again, volatile is unnecessary. Of course, busy-
waiting is generally an anti-social act to begin with.
There are still a few rare situations where volatile makes sense in the
kernel:

3
Documentation/watchdog/src/watchdog-simple.c

@ -17,9 +17,6 @@ int main(void)
ret = -1;
break;
}
ret = fsync(fd);
if (ret)
break;
sleep(10);
}
close(fd);

8
Documentation/watchdog/src/watchdog-test.c

@ -31,6 +31,8 @@ static void keep_alive(void)
*/
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
int flags;
fd = open("/dev/watchdog", O_WRONLY);
if (fd == -1) {
@ -41,12 +43,14 @@ int main(int argc, char *argv[])
if (argc > 1) {
if (!strncasecmp(argv[1], "-d", 2)) {
ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETOPTIONS, WDIOS_DISABLECARD);
flags = WDIOS_DISABLECARD;
ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETOPTIONS, &flags);
fprintf(stderr, "Watchdog card disabled.\n");
fflush(stderr);
exit(0);
} else if (!strncasecmp(argv[1], "-e", 2)) {
ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETOPTIONS, WDIOS_ENABLECARD);
flags = WDIOS_ENABLECARD;
ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETOPTIONS, &flags);
fprintf(stderr, "Watchdog card enabled.\n");
fflush(stderr);
exit(0);

5
Documentation/watchdog/watchdog-api.txt

@ -222,11 +222,10 @@ returned value is the temperature in degrees fahrenheit.
ioctl(fd, WDIOC_GETTEMP, &temperature);
Finally the SETOPTIONS ioctl can be used to control some aspects of
the cards operation; right now the pcwd driver is the only one
supporting this ioctl.
the cards operation.
int options = 0;
ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETOPTIONS, options);
ioctl(fd, WDIOC_SETOPTIONS, &options);
The following options are available:

65
MAINTAINERS

@ -797,12 +797,12 @@ M: Michael Petchkovsky <mkpetch@internode.on.net>
S: Maintained
ARM/NOMADIK ARCHITECTURE
M: Alessandro Rubini <rubini@unipv.it>
M: STEricsson <STEricsson_nomadik_linux@list.st.com>
L: linux-arm-kernel@lists.infradead.org (moderated for non-subscribers)
S: Maintained
F: arch/arm/mach-nomadik/
F: arch/arm/plat-nomadik/
M: Alessandro Rubini <rubini@unipv.it>
M: STEricsson <STEricsson_nomadik_linux@list.st.com>
L: linux-arm-kernel@lists.infradead.org (moderated for non-subscribers)
S: Maintained
F: arch/arm/mach-nomadik/
F: arch/arm/plat-nomadik/
ARM/OPENMOKO NEO FREERUNNER (GTA02) MACHINE SUPPORT
M: Nelson Castillo <arhuaco@freaks-unidos.net>
@ -1443,7 +1443,7 @@ F: arch/powerpc/platforms/cell/
CEPH DISTRIBUTED FILE SYSTEM CLIENT
M: Sage Weil <sage@newdream.net>
L: ceph-devel@lists.sourceforge.net
L: ceph-devel@vger.kernel.org
W: http://ceph.newdream.net/
T: git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/sage/ceph-client.git
S: Supported
@ -1927,17 +1927,17 @@ F: drivers/scsi/dpt*
F: drivers/scsi/dpt/
DRBD DRIVER
P: Philipp Reisner
P: Lars Ellenberg
M: drbd-dev@lists.linbit.com
L: drbd-user@lists.linbit.com
W: http://www.drbd.org
T: git git://git.drbd.org/linux-2.6-drbd.git drbd
T: git git://git.drbd.org/drbd-8.3.git
S: Supported
F: drivers/block/drbd/
F: lib/lru_cache.c
F: Documentation/blockdev/drbd/
P: Philipp Reisner
P: Lars Ellenberg
M: drbd-dev@lists.linbit.com
L: drbd-user@lists.linbit.com
W: http://www.drbd.org
T: git git://git.drbd.org/linux-2.6-drbd.git drbd
T: git git://git.drbd.org/drbd-8.3.git
S: Supported
F: drivers/block/drbd/
F: lib/lru_cache.c
F: Documentation/blockdev/drbd/
DRIVER CORE, KOBJECTS, AND SYSFS
M: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@suse.de>
@ -2475,12 +2475,6 @@ L: linuxppc-dev@ozlabs.org
S: Odd Fixes
F: drivers/char/hvc_*
VIRTIO CONSOLE DRIVER
M: Amit Shah <amit.shah@redhat.com>
L: virtualization@lists.linux-foundation.org
S: Maintained
F: drivers/char/virtio_console.c
iSCSI BOOT FIRMWARE TABLE (iBFT) DRIVER
M: Peter Jones <pjones@redhat.com>
M: Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk <konrad@kernel.org>
@ -3270,6 +3264,16 @@ S: Maintained
F: include/linux/kexec.h
F: kernel/kexec.c
KEYS/KEYRINGS:
M: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
L: keyrings@linux-nfs.org
S: Maintained
F: Documentation/keys.txt
F: include/linux/key.h
F: include/linux/key-type.h
F: include/keys/
F: security/keys/
KGDB
M: Jason Wessel <jason.wessel@windriver.com>
L: kgdb-bugreport@lists.sourceforge.net
@ -3519,8 +3523,8 @@ F: drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/
LTP (Linux Test Project)
M: Rishikesh K Rajak <risrajak@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
M: Garrett Cooper <yanegomi@gmail.com>
M: Mike Frysinger <vapier@gentoo.org>
M: Subrata Modak <subrata@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
M: Mike Frysinger <vapier@gentoo.org>
M: Subrata Modak <subrata@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
L: ltp-list@lists.sourceforge.net (subscribers-only)
W: http://ltp.sourceforge.net/
T: git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/galak/ltp.git
@ -5960,6 +5964,13 @@ S: Maintained
F: Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt
F: fs/fat/
VIRTIO CONSOLE DRIVER
M: Amit Shah <amit.shah@redhat.com>
L: virtualization@lists.linux-foundation.org
S: Maintained
F: drivers/char/virtio_console.c
F: include/linux/virtio_console.h
VIRTIO HOST (VHOST)
M: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
L: kvm@vger.kernel.org
@ -6200,7 +6211,7 @@ F: arch/x86/
X86 PLATFORM DRIVERS
M: Matthew Garrett <mjg@redhat.com>
L: platform-driver-x86@vger.kernel.org
T: git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mjg59/platform-drivers-x86.git
T: git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mjg59/platform-drivers-x86.git
S: Maintained
F: drivers/platform/x86

2
Makefile

@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
VERSION = 2
PATCHLEVEL = 6
SUBLEVEL = 34
EXTRAVERSION = -rc2
EXTRAVERSION = -rc3
NAME = Man-Eating Seals of Antiquity
# *DOCUMENTATION*

1
arch/alpha/boot/bootp.c

@ -8,6 +8,7 @@
* based significantly on the arch/alpha/boot/main.c of Linus Torvalds
*/
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/string.h>
#include <generated/utsrelease.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>

1
arch/alpha/boot/bootpz.c

@ -10,6 +10,7 @@
* and the decompression code from MILO.
*/
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/string.h>
#include <generated/utsrelease.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>

1
arch/alpha/boot/main.c

@ -6,6 +6,7 @@
* This file is the bootloader for the Linux/AXP kernel
*/
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/string.h>
#include <generated/utsrelease.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>

1
arch/alpha/boot/misc.c

@ -19,6 +19,7 @@
*/
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <asm/uaccess.h>

1
arch/alpha/kernel/irq.c

@ -18,7 +18,6 @@
#include <linux/sched.h>
#include <linux/ptrace.h>
#include <linux/interrupt.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/random.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/irq.h>

2
arch/alpha/kernel/osf_sys.c

@ -20,7 +20,6 @@
#include <linux/syscalls.h>
#include <linux/unistd.h>
#include <linux/ptrace.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/user.h>
#include <linux/utsname.h>
#include <linux/time.h>
@ -37,6 +36,7 @@
#include <linux/uio.h>
#include <linux/vfs.h>
#include <linux/rcupdate.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <asm/fpu.h>
#include <asm/io.h>

1
arch/alpha/kernel/pci-noop.c

@ -7,6 +7,7 @@
#include <linux/pci.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/bootmem.h>
#include <linux/gfp.h>
#include <linux/capability.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>
#include <linux/errno.h>

1
arch/alpha/kernel/pci-sysfs.c

@ -10,6 +10,7 @@
*/
#include <linux/sched.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/pci.h>
static int hose_mmap_page_range(struct pci_controller *hose,

2
arch/alpha/kernel/pci_iommu.c

@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>
#include <linux/pci.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/gfp.h>
#include <linux/bootmem.h>
#include <linux/scatterlist.h>
#include <linux/log2.h>

2
arch/alpha/kernel/process.c

@ -17,7 +17,6 @@
#include <linux/stddef.h>
#include <linux/unistd.h>
#include <linux/ptrace.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/user.h>
#include <linux/time.h>
#include <linux/major.h>
@ -28,6 +27,7 @@
#include <linux/reboot.h>
#include <linux/tty.h>
#include <linux/console.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <asm/reg.h>
#include <asm/uaccess.h>

1
arch/alpha/kernel/ptrace.c

@ -11,7 +11,6 @@
#include <linux/errno.h>
#include <linux/ptrace.h>
#include <linux/user.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/security.h>
#include <linux/signal.h>

1
arch/alpha/kernel/smc37c669.c

@ -3,7 +3,6 @@
*/
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/delay.h>

1
arch/alpha/kernel/smc37c93x.c

@ -4,7 +4,6 @@
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/delay.h>

1
arch/alpha/kernel/srm_env.c

@ -30,6 +30,7 @@
*/
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/gfp.h>
#include <linux/module.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/proc_fs.h>

1
arch/alpha/mm/init.c

@ -20,6 +20,7 @@
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/bootmem.h> /* max_low_pfn */
#include <linux/vmalloc.h>
#include <linux/gfp.h>
#include <asm/system.h>
#include <asm/uaccess.h>

1
arch/arm/common/clkdev.c

@ -18,6 +18,7 @@
#include <linux/string.h>
#include <linux/mutex.h>
#include <linux/clk.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <asm/clkdev.h>
#include <mach/clkdev.h>

1
arch/arm/common/it8152.c

@ -21,7 +21,6 @@
#include <linux/ptrace.h>
#include <linux/interrupt.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>
#include <linux/slab.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/ioport.h>
#include <linux/irq.h>

10
arch/arm/common/locomo.c

@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ static int locomo_suspend(struct platform_device *dev, pm_message_t state)
save->LCM_GPO = locomo_readl(lchip->base + LOCOMO_GPO); /* GPIO */
locomo_writel(0x00, lchip->base + LOCOMO_GPO);
save->LCM_SPICT = locomo_readl(lchip->base + LOCOMO_SPI + LOCOMO_SPICT); /* SPI */
locomo_writel(0x40, lchip->base + LOCOMO_SPICT);
locomo_writel(0x40, lchip->base + LOCOMO_SPI + LOCOMO_SPICT);
save->LCM_GPE = locomo_readl(lchip->base + LOCOMO_GPE); /* GPIO */
locomo_writel(0x00, lchip->base + LOCOMO_GPE);
save->LCM_ASD = locomo_readl(lchip->base + LOCOMO_ASD); /* ADSTART */
@ -418,7 +418,7 @@ __locomo_probe(struct device *me, struct resource *mem, int irq)
/* Longtime timer */
locomo_writel(0, lchip->base + LOCOMO_LTINT);
/* SPI */
locomo_writel(0, lchip->base + LOCOMO_SPIIE);
locomo_writel(0, lchip->base + LOCOMO_SPI + LOCOMO_SPIIE);
locomo_writel(6 + 8 + 320 + 30 - 10, lchip->base + LOCOMO_ASD);
r = locomo_readl(lchip->base + LOCOMO_ASD);
@ -707,7 +707,7 @@ void locomo_m62332_senddata(struct locomo_dev *ldev, unsigned int dac_data, int
udelay(DAC_SCL_HIGH_HOLD_TIME); /* 4.7 usec */
if (locomo_readl(mapbase + LOCOMO_DAC) & LOCOMO_DAC_SDAOEB) { /* High is error */
printk(KERN_WARNING "locomo: m62332_senddata Error 1\n");
return;
goto out;
}
/* Send Sub address (LSB is channel select) */
@ -735,7 +735,7 @@ void locomo_m62332_senddata(struct locomo_dev *ldev, unsigned int dac_data, int
udelay(DAC_SCL_HIGH_HOLD_TIME); /* 4.7 usec */
if (locomo_readl(mapbase + LOCOMO_DAC) & LOCOMO_DAC_SDAOEB) { /* High is error */
printk(KERN_WARNING "locomo: m62332_senddata Error 2\n");
return;
goto out;
}
/* Send DAC data */
@ -760,9 +760,9 @@ void locomo_m62332_senddata(struct locomo_dev *ldev, unsigned int dac_data, int
udelay(DAC_SCL_HIGH_HOLD_TIME); /* 4.7 usec */
if (locomo_readl(mapbase + LOCOMO_DAC) & LOCOMO_DAC_SDAOEB) { /* High is error */
printk(KERN_WARNING "locomo: m62332_senddata Error 3\n");
return;
}
out:
/* stop */
r = locomo_readl(mapbase + LOCOMO_DAC);
r &= ~(LOCOMO_DAC_SCLOEB);

38
arch/arm/include/asm/cacheflush.h

@ -15,6 +15,7 @@
#include <asm/glue.h>
#include <asm/shmparam.h>
#include <asm/cachetype.h>
#include <asm/outercache.h>
#define CACHE_COLOUR(vaddr) ((vaddr & (SHMLBA - 1)) >> PAGE_SHIFT)
@ -219,12 +220,6 @@ struct cpu_cache_fns {
void (*dma_flush_range)(const void *, const void *);
};
struct outer_cache_fns {
void (*inv_range)(unsigned long, unsigned long);
void (*clean_range)(unsigned long, unsigned long);
void (*flush_range)(unsigned long, unsigned long);
};
/*
* Select the calling method
*/
@ -281,37 +276,6 @@ extern void dmac_flush_range(const void *, const void *);
#endif
#ifdef CONFIG_OUTER_CACHE
extern struct outer_cache_fns outer_cache;
static inline void outer_inv_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{
if (outer_cache.inv_range)
outer_cache.inv_range(start, end);
}
static inline void outer_clean_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{
if (outer_cache.clean_range)
outer_cache.clean_range(start, end);
}
static inline void outer_flush_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{
if (outer_cache.flush_range)
outer_cache.flush_range(start, end);
}
#else
static inline void outer_inv_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{ }
static inline void outer_clean_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{ }
static inline void outer_flush_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{ }
#endif
/*
* Copy user data from/to a page which is mapped into a different
* processes address space. Really, we want to allow our "user

1
arch/arm/include/asm/clkdev.h

@ -13,6 +13,7 @@
#define __ASM_CLKDEV_H
struct clk;
struct device;
struct clk_lookup {
struct list_head node;

1
arch/arm/include/asm/irq.h

@ -17,6 +17,7 @@
#ifndef __ASSEMBLY__
struct irqaction;
struct pt_regs;
extern void migrate_irqs(void);
extern void asm_do_IRQ(unsigned int, struct pt_regs *);

75
arch/arm/include/asm/outercache.h

@ -0,0 +1,75 @@
/*
* arch/arm/include/asm/outercache.h
*
* Copyright (C) 2010 ARM Ltd.
* Written by Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
*
* This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
* it under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 as
* published by the Free Software Foundation.
*
* This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
* but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
* MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
* GNU General Public License for more details.
*
* You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
* along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
* Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
*/
#ifndef __ASM_OUTERCACHE_H
#define __ASM_OUTERCACHE_H
struct outer_cache_fns {
void (*inv_range)(unsigned long, unsigned long);
void (*clean_range)(unsigned long, unsigned long);
void (*flush_range)(unsigned long, unsigned long);
#ifdef CONFIG_OUTER_CACHE_SYNC
void (*sync)(void);
#endif
};
#ifdef CONFIG_OUTER_CACHE
extern struct outer_cache_fns outer_cache;
static inline void outer_inv_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{
if (outer_cache.inv_range)
outer_cache.inv_range(start, end);
}
static inline void outer_clean_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{
if (outer_cache.clean_range)
outer_cache.clean_range(start, end);
}
static inline void outer_flush_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{
if (outer_cache.flush_range)
outer_cache.flush_range(start, end);
}
#else
static inline void outer_inv_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{ }
static inline void outer_clean_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{ }
static inline void outer_flush_range(unsigned long start, unsigned long end)
{ }
#endif
#ifdef CONFIG_OUTER_CACHE_SYNC
static inline void outer_sync(void)
{