original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
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block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
include cleanup: Update gfp.h and slab.h includes to prepare for breaking implicit slab.h inclusion from percpu.h percpu.h is included by sched.h and module.h and thus ends up being included when building most .c files. percpu.h includes slab.h which in turn includes gfp.h making everything defined by the two files universally available and complicating inclusion dependencies. percpu.h -> slab.h dependency is about to be removed. Prepare for this change by updating users of gfp and slab facilities include those headers directly instead of assuming availability. As this conversion needs to touch large number of source files, the following script is used as the basis of conversion. http://userweb.kernel.org/~tj/misc/slabh-sweep.py The script does the followings. * Scan files for gfp and slab usages and update includes such that only the necessary includes are there. ie. if only gfp is used, gfp.h, if slab is used, slab.h. * When the script inserts a new include, it looks at the include blocks and try to put the new include such that its order conforms to its surrounding. It's put in the include block which contains core kernel includes, in the same order that the rest are ordered - alphabetical, Christmas tree, rev-Xmas-tree or at the end if there doesn't seem to be any matching order. * If the script can't find a place to put a new include (mostly because the file doesn't have fitting include block), it prints out an error message indicating which .h file needs to be added to the file. The conversion was done in the following steps. 1. The initial automatic conversion of all .c files updated slightly over 4000 files, deleting around 700 includes and adding ~480 gfp.h and ~3000 slab.h inclusions. The script emitted errors for ~400 files. 2. Each error was manually checked. Some didn't need the inclusion, some needed manual addition while adding it to implementation .h or embedding .c file was more appropriate for others. This step added inclusions to around 150 files. 3. The script was run again and the output was compared to the edits from #2 to make sure no file was left behind. 4. Several build tests were done and a couple of problems were fixed. e.g. lib/decompress_*.c used malloc/free() wrappers around slab APIs requiring slab.h to be added manually. 5. The script was run on all .h files but without automatically editing them as sprinkling gfp.h and slab.h inclusions around .h files could easily lead to inclusion dependency hell. Most gfp.h inclusion directives were ignored as stuff from gfp.h was usually wildly available and often used in preprocessor macros. Each slab.h inclusion directive was examined and added manually as necessary. 6. percpu.h was updated not to include slab.h. 7. Build test were done on the following configurations and failures were fixed. CONFIG_GCOV_KERNEL was turned off for all tests (as my distributed build env didn't work with gcov compiles) and a few more options had to be turned off depending on archs to make things build (like ipr on powerpc/64 which failed due to missing writeq). * x86 and x86_64 UP and SMP allmodconfig and a custom test config. * powerpc and powerpc64 SMP allmodconfig * sparc and sparc64 SMP allmodconfig * ia64 SMP allmodconfig * s390 SMP allmodconfig * alpha SMP allmodconfig * um on x86_64 SMP allmodconfig 8. percpu.h modifications were reverted so that it could be applied as a separate patch and serve as bisection point. Given the fact that I had only a couple of failures from tests on step 6, I'm fairly confident about the coverage of this conversion patch. If there is a breakage, it's likely to be something in one of the arch headers which should be easily discoverable easily on most builds of the specific arch. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Guess-its-ok-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: Lee Schermerhorn <Lee.Schermerhorn@hp.com>
12 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: drop barrier ordering by queue draining Filesystems will take all the responsibilities for ordering requests around commit writes and will only indicate how the commit writes themselves should be handled by block layers. This patch drops barrier ordering by queue draining from block layer. Ordering by draining implementation was somewhat invasive to request handling. List of notable changes follow. * Each queue has 1 bit color which is flipped on each barrier issue. This is used to track whether a given request is issued before the current barrier or not. REQ_ORDERED_COLOR flag and coloring implementation in __elv_add_request() are removed. * Requests which shouldn't be processed yet for draining were stalled by returning -EAGAIN from blk_do_ordered() according to the test result between blk_ordered_req_seq() and blk_blk_ordered_cur_seq(). This logic is removed. * Draining completion logic in elv_completed_request() removed. * All barrier sequence requests were queued to request queue and then trckled to lower layer according to progress and thus maintaining request orders during requeue was necessary. This is replaced by queueing the next request in the barrier sequence only after the current one is complete from blk_ordered_complete_seq(), which removes the need for multiple proxy requests in struct request_queue and the request sorting logic in the ELEVATOR_INSERT_REQUEUE path of elv_insert(). * As barriers no longer have ordering constraints, there's no need to dump the whole elevator onto the dispatch queue on each barrier. Insert barriers at the front instead. * If other barrier requests come to the front of the dispatch queue while one is already in progress, they are stored in q->pending_barriers and restored to dispatch queue one-by-one after each barrier completion from blk_ordered_complete_seq(). Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: drop barrier ordering by queue draining Filesystems will take all the responsibilities for ordering requests around commit writes and will only indicate how the commit writes themselves should be handled by block layers. This patch drops barrier ordering by queue draining from block layer. Ordering by draining implementation was somewhat invasive to request handling. List of notable changes follow. * Each queue has 1 bit color which is flipped on each barrier issue. This is used to track whether a given request is issued before the current barrier or not. REQ_ORDERED_COLOR flag and coloring implementation in __elv_add_request() are removed. * Requests which shouldn't be processed yet for draining were stalled by returning -EAGAIN from blk_do_ordered() according to the test result between blk_ordered_req_seq() and blk_blk_ordered_cur_seq(). This logic is removed. * Draining completion logic in elv_completed_request() removed. * All barrier sequence requests were queued to request queue and then trckled to lower layer according to progress and thus maintaining request orders during requeue was necessary. This is replaced by queueing the next request in the barrier sequence only after the current one is complete from blk_ordered_complete_seq(), which removes the need for multiple proxy requests in struct request_queue and the request sorting logic in the ELEVATOR_INSERT_REQUEUE path of elv_insert(). * As barriers no longer have ordering constraints, there's no need to dump the whole elevator onto the dispatch queue on each barrier. Insert barriers at the front instead. * If other barrier requests come to the front of the dispatch queue while one is already in progress, they are stored in q->pending_barriers and restored to dispatch queue one-by-one after each barrier completion from blk_ordered_complete_seq(). Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix flush machinery for stacking drivers with differring flush flags Commit ae1b1539622fb46e51b4d13b3f9e5f4c713f86ae, block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge, introduced a performance regression when running any sort of fsyncing workload using dm-multipath and certain storage (in our case, an HP EVA). The test I ran was fs_mark, and it dropped from ~800 files/sec on ext4 to ~100 files/sec. It turns out that dm-multipath always advertised flush+fua support, and passed commands on down the stack, where those flags used to get stripped off. The above commit changed that behavior: static inline struct request *__elv_next_request(struct request_queue *q) { struct request *rq; while (1) { - while (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { + if (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { rq = list_entry_rq(q->queue_head.next); - if (!(rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA)) || - (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH_SEQ)) - return rq; - rq = blk_do_flush(q, rq); - if (rq) - return rq; + return rq; } Note that previously, a command would come in here, have REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA set, and then get handed off to blk_do_flush: struct request *blk_do_flush(struct request_queue *q, struct request *rq) { unsigned int fflags = q->flush_flags; /* may change, cache it */ bool has_flush = fflags & REQ_FLUSH, has_fua = fflags & REQ_FUA; bool do_preflush = has_flush && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH); bool do_postflush = has_flush && !has_fua && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FUA); unsigned skip = 0; ... if (blk_rq_sectors(rq) && !do_preflush && !do_postflush) { rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FLUSH; if (!has_fua) rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FUA; return rq; } So, the flush machinery was bypassed in such cases (q->flush_flags == 0 && rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA)). Now, however, we don't get into the flush machinery at all. Instead, __elv_next_request just hands a request with flush and fua bits set to the scsi_request_fn, even if the underlying request_queue does not support flush or fua. The agreed upon approach is to fix the flush machinery to allow stacking. While this isn't used in practice (since there is only one request-based dm target, and that target will now reflect the flush flags of the underlying device), it does future-proof the solution, and make it function as designed. In order to make this work, I had to add a field to the struct request, inside the flush structure (to store the original req->end_io). Shaohua had suggested overloading the union with rb_node and completion_data, but the completion data is used by device mapper and can also be used by other drivers. So, I didn't see a way around the additional field. I tested this patch on an HP EVA with both ext4 and xfs, and it recovers the lost performance. Comments and other testers, as always, are appreciated. Cheers, Jeff Signed-off-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
10 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix flush machinery for stacking drivers with differring flush flags Commit ae1b1539622fb46e51b4d13b3f9e5f4c713f86ae, block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge, introduced a performance regression when running any sort of fsyncing workload using dm-multipath and certain storage (in our case, an HP EVA). The test I ran was fs_mark, and it dropped from ~800 files/sec on ext4 to ~100 files/sec. It turns out that dm-multipath always advertised flush+fua support, and passed commands on down the stack, where those flags used to get stripped off. The above commit changed that behavior: static inline struct request *__elv_next_request(struct request_queue *q) { struct request *rq; while (1) { - while (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { + if (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { rq = list_entry_rq(q->queue_head.next); - if (!(rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA)) || - (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH_SEQ)) - return rq; - rq = blk_do_flush(q, rq); - if (rq) - return rq; + return rq; } Note that previously, a command would come in here, have REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA set, and then get handed off to blk_do_flush: struct request *blk_do_flush(struct request_queue *q, struct request *rq) { unsigned int fflags = q->flush_flags; /* may change, cache it */ bool has_flush = fflags & REQ_FLUSH, has_fua = fflags & REQ_FUA; bool do_preflush = has_flush && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH); bool do_postflush = has_flush && !has_fua && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FUA); unsigned skip = 0; ... if (blk_rq_sectors(rq) && !do_preflush && !do_postflush) { rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FLUSH; if (!has_fua) rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FUA; return rq; } So, the flush machinery was bypassed in such cases (q->flush_flags == 0 && rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA)). Now, however, we don't get into the flush machinery at all. Instead, __elv_next_request just hands a request with flush and fua bits set to the scsi_request_fn, even if the underlying request_queue does not support flush or fua. The agreed upon approach is to fix the flush machinery to allow stacking. While this isn't used in practice (since there is only one request-based dm target, and that target will now reflect the flush flags of the underlying device), it does future-proof the solution, and make it function as designed. In order to make this work, I had to add a field to the struct request, inside the flush structure (to store the original req->end_io). Shaohua had suggested overloading the union with rb_node and completion_data, but the completion data is used by device mapper and can also be used by other drivers. So, I didn't see a way around the additional field. I tested this patch on an HP EVA with both ext4 and xfs, and it recovers the lost performance. Comments and other testers, as always, are appreciated. Cheers, Jeff Signed-off-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
10 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: fix flush machinery for stacking drivers with differring flush flags Commit ae1b1539622fb46e51b4d13b3f9e5f4c713f86ae, block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge, introduced a performance regression when running any sort of fsyncing workload using dm-multipath and certain storage (in our case, an HP EVA). The test I ran was fs_mark, and it dropped from ~800 files/sec on ext4 to ~100 files/sec. It turns out that dm-multipath always advertised flush+fua support, and passed commands on down the stack, where those flags used to get stripped off. The above commit changed that behavior: static inline struct request *__elv_next_request(struct request_queue *q) { struct request *rq; while (1) { - while (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { + if (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { rq = list_entry_rq(q->queue_head.next); - if (!(rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA)) || - (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH_SEQ)) - return rq; - rq = blk_do_flush(q, rq); - if (rq) - return rq; + return rq; } Note that previously, a command would come in here, have REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA set, and then get handed off to blk_do_flush: struct request *blk_do_flush(struct request_queue *q, struct request *rq) { unsigned int fflags = q->flush_flags; /* may change, cache it */ bool has_flush = fflags & REQ_FLUSH, has_fua = fflags & REQ_FUA; bool do_preflush = has_flush && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH); bool do_postflush = has_flush && !has_fua && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FUA); unsigned skip = 0; ... if (blk_rq_sectors(rq) && !do_preflush && !do_postflush) { rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FLUSH; if (!has_fua) rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FUA; return rq; } So, the flush machinery was bypassed in such cases (q->flush_flags == 0 && rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA)). Now, however, we don't get into the flush machinery at all. Instead, __elv_next_request just hands a request with flush and fua bits set to the scsi_request_fn, even if the underlying request_queue does not support flush or fua. The agreed upon approach is to fix the flush machinery to allow stacking. While this isn't used in practice (since there is only one request-based dm target, and that target will now reflect the flush flags of the underlying device), it does future-proof the solution, and make it function as designed. In order to make this work, I had to add a field to the struct request, inside the flush structure (to store the original req->end_io). Shaohua had suggested overloading the union with rb_node and completion_data, but the completion data is used by device mapper and can also be used by other drivers. So, I didn't see a way around the additional field. I tested this patch on an HP EVA with both ext4 and xfs, and it recovers the lost performance. Comments and other testers, as always, are appreciated. Cheers, Jeff Signed-off-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
10 years ago
block: fix flush machinery for stacking drivers with differring flush flags Commit ae1b1539622fb46e51b4d13b3f9e5f4c713f86ae, block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge, introduced a performance regression when running any sort of fsyncing workload using dm-multipath and certain storage (in our case, an HP EVA). The test I ran was fs_mark, and it dropped from ~800 files/sec on ext4 to ~100 files/sec. It turns out that dm-multipath always advertised flush+fua support, and passed commands on down the stack, where those flags used to get stripped off. The above commit changed that behavior: static inline struct request *__elv_next_request(struct request_queue *q) { struct request *rq; while (1) { - while (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { + if (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { rq = list_entry_rq(q->queue_head.next); - if (!(rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA)) || - (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH_SEQ)) - return rq; - rq = blk_do_flush(q, rq); - if (rq) - return rq; + return rq; } Note that previously, a command would come in here, have REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA set, and then get handed off to blk_do_flush: struct request *blk_do_flush(struct request_queue *q, struct request *rq) { unsigned int fflags = q->flush_flags; /* may change, cache it */ bool has_flush = fflags & REQ_FLUSH, has_fua = fflags & REQ_FUA; bool do_preflush = has_flush && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH); bool do_postflush = has_flush && !has_fua && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FUA); unsigned skip = 0; ... if (blk_rq_sectors(rq) && !do_preflush && !do_postflush) { rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FLUSH; if (!has_fua) rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FUA; return rq; } So, the flush machinery was bypassed in such cases (q->flush_flags == 0 && rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA)). Now, however, we don't get into the flush machinery at all. Instead, __elv_next_request just hands a request with flush and fua bits set to the scsi_request_fn, even if the underlying request_queue does not support flush or fua. The agreed upon approach is to fix the flush machinery to allow stacking. While this isn't used in practice (since there is only one request-based dm target, and that target will now reflect the flush flags of the underlying device), it does future-proof the solution, and make it function as designed. In order to make this work, I had to add a field to the struct request, inside the flush structure (to store the original req->end_io). Shaohua had suggested overloading the union with rb_node and completion_data, but the completion data is used by device mapper and can also be used by other drivers. So, I didn't see a way around the additional field. I tested this patch on an HP EVA with both ext4 and xfs, and it recovers the lost performance. Comments and other testers, as always, are appreciated. Cheers, Jeff Signed-off-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
10 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: drop barrier ordering by queue draining Filesystems will take all the responsibilities for ordering requests around commit writes and will only indicate how the commit writes themselves should be handled by block layers. This patch drops barrier ordering by queue draining from block layer. Ordering by draining implementation was somewhat invasive to request handling. List of notable changes follow. * Each queue has 1 bit color which is flipped on each barrier issue. This is used to track whether a given request is issued before the current barrier or not. REQ_ORDERED_COLOR flag and coloring implementation in __elv_add_request() are removed. * Requests which shouldn't be processed yet for draining were stalled by returning -EAGAIN from blk_do_ordered() according to the test result between blk_ordered_req_seq() and blk_blk_ordered_cur_seq(). This logic is removed. * Draining completion logic in elv_completed_request() removed. * All barrier sequence requests were queued to request queue and then trckled to lower layer according to progress and thus maintaining request orders during requeue was necessary. This is replaced by queueing the next request in the barrier sequence only after the current one is complete from blk_ordered_complete_seq(), which removes the need for multiple proxy requests in struct request_queue and the request sorting logic in the ELEVATOR_INSERT_REQUEUE path of elv_insert(). * As barriers no longer have ordering constraints, there's no need to dump the whole elevator onto the dispatch queue on each barrier. Insert barriers at the front instead. * If other barrier requests come to the front of the dispatch queue while one is already in progress, they are stored in q->pending_barriers and restored to dispatch queue one-by-one after each barrier completion from blk_ordered_complete_seq(). Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix flush machinery for stacking drivers with differring flush flags Commit ae1b1539622fb46e51b4d13b3f9e5f4c713f86ae, block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge, introduced a performance regression when running any sort of fsyncing workload using dm-multipath and certain storage (in our case, an HP EVA). The test I ran was fs_mark, and it dropped from ~800 files/sec on ext4 to ~100 files/sec. It turns out that dm-multipath always advertised flush+fua support, and passed commands on down the stack, where those flags used to get stripped off. The above commit changed that behavior: static inline struct request *__elv_next_request(struct request_queue *q) { struct request *rq; while (1) { - while (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { + if (!list_empty(&q->queue_head)) { rq = list_entry_rq(q->queue_head.next); - if (!(rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA)) || - (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH_SEQ)) - return rq; - rq = blk_do_flush(q, rq); - if (rq) - return rq; + return rq; } Note that previously, a command would come in here, have REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA set, and then get handed off to blk_do_flush: struct request *blk_do_flush(struct request_queue *q, struct request *rq) { unsigned int fflags = q->flush_flags; /* may change, cache it */ bool has_flush = fflags & REQ_FLUSH, has_fua = fflags & REQ_FUA; bool do_preflush = has_flush && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH); bool do_postflush = has_flush && !has_fua && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FUA); unsigned skip = 0; ... if (blk_rq_sectors(rq) && !do_preflush && !do_postflush) { rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FLUSH; if (!has_fua) rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FUA; return rq; } So, the flush machinery was bypassed in such cases (q->flush_flags == 0 && rq->cmd_flags & (REQ_FLUSH|REQ_FUA)). Now, however, we don't get into the flush machinery at all. Instead, __elv_next_request just hands a request with flush and fua bits set to the scsi_request_fn, even if the underlying request_queue does not support flush or fua. The agreed upon approach is to fix the flush machinery to allow stacking. While this isn't used in practice (since there is only one request-based dm target, and that target will now reflect the flush flags of the underlying device), it does future-proof the solution, and make it function as designed. In order to make this work, I had to add a field to the struct request, inside the flush structure (to store the original req->end_io). Shaohua had suggested overloading the union with rb_node and completion_data, but the completion data is used by device mapper and can also be used by other drivers. So, I didn't see a way around the additional field. I tested this patch on an HP EVA with both ext4 and xfs, and it recovers the lost performance. Comments and other testers, as always, are appreciated. Cheers, Jeff Signed-off-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
10 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: drop barrier ordering by queue draining Filesystems will take all the responsibilities for ordering requests around commit writes and will only indicate how the commit writes themselves should be handled by block layers. This patch drops barrier ordering by queue draining from block layer. Ordering by draining implementation was somewhat invasive to request handling. List of notable changes follow. * Each queue has 1 bit color which is flipped on each barrier issue. This is used to track whether a given request is issued before the current barrier or not. REQ_ORDERED_COLOR flag and coloring implementation in __elv_add_request() are removed. * Requests which shouldn't be processed yet for draining were stalled by returning -EAGAIN from blk_do_ordered() according to the test result between blk_ordered_req_seq() and blk_blk_ordered_cur_seq(). This logic is removed. * Draining completion logic in elv_completed_request() removed. * All barrier sequence requests were queued to request queue and then trckled to lower layer according to progress and thus maintaining request orders during requeue was necessary. This is replaced by queueing the next request in the barrier sequence only after the current one is complete from blk_ordered_complete_seq(), which removes the need for multiple proxy requests in struct request_queue and the request sorting logic in the ELEVATOR_INSERT_REQUEUE path of elv_insert(). * As barriers no longer have ordering constraints, there's no need to dump the whole elevator onto the dispatch queue on each barrier. Insert barriers at the front instead. * If other barrier requests come to the front of the dispatch queue while one is already in progress, they are stored in q->pending_barriers and restored to dispatch queue one-by-one after each barrier completion from blk_ordered_complete_seq(). Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: drop barrier ordering by queue draining Filesystems will take all the responsibilities for ordering requests around commit writes and will only indicate how the commit writes themselves should be handled by block layers. This patch drops barrier ordering by queue draining from block layer. Ordering by draining implementation was somewhat invasive to request handling. List of notable changes follow. * Each queue has 1 bit color which is flipped on each barrier issue. This is used to track whether a given request is issued before the current barrier or not. REQ_ORDERED_COLOR flag and coloring implementation in __elv_add_request() are removed. * Requests which shouldn't be processed yet for draining were stalled by returning -EAGAIN from blk_do_ordered() according to the test result between blk_ordered_req_seq() and blk_blk_ordered_cur_seq(). This logic is removed. * Draining completion logic in elv_completed_request() removed. * All barrier sequence requests were queued to request queue and then trckled to lower layer according to progress and thus maintaining request orders during requeue was necessary. This is replaced by queueing the next request in the barrier sequence only after the current one is complete from blk_ordered_complete_seq(), which removes the need for multiple proxy requests in struct request_queue and the request sorting logic in the ELEVATOR_INSERT_REQUEUE path of elv_insert(). * As barriers no longer have ordering constraints, there's no need to dump the whole elevator onto the dispatch queue on each barrier. Insert barriers at the front instead. * If other barrier requests come to the front of the dispatch queue while one is already in progress, they are stored in q->pending_barriers and restored to dispatch queue one-by-one after each barrier completion from blk_ordered_complete_seq(). Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: implement REQ_FLUSH/FUA based interface for FLUSH/FUA requests Now that the backend conversion is complete, export sequenced FLUSH/FUA capability through REQ_FLUSH/FUA flags. REQ_FLUSH means the device cache should be flushed before executing the request. REQ_FUA means that the data in the request should be on non-volatile media on completion. Block layer will choose the correct way of implementing the semantics and execute it. The request may be passed to the device directly if the device can handle it; otherwise, it will be sequenced using one or more proxy requests. Devices will never see REQ_FLUSH and/or FUA which it doesn't support. Also, unlike the original REQ_HARDBARRIER, REQ_FLUSH/FUA requests are never failed with -EOPNOTSUPP. If the underlying device doesn't support FLUSH/FUA, the block layer simply make those noop. IOW, it no longer distinguishes between writeback cache which doesn't support cache flush and writethrough/no cache. Devices which have WB cache w/o flush are very difficult to come by these days and there's nothing much we can do anyway, so it doesn't make sense to require everyone to implement -EOPNOTSUPP handling. This will simplify filesystems and block drivers as they can drop -EOPNOTSUPP retry logic for barriers. * QUEUE_ORDERED_* are removed and QUEUE_FSEQ_* are moved into blk-flush.c. * REQ_FLUSH w/o data can also be directly passed to drivers without sequencing but some drivers assume that zero length requests don't have rq->bio which isn't true for these requests requiring the use of proxy requests. * REQ_COMMON_MASK now includes REQ_FLUSH | REQ_FUA so that they are copied from bio to request. * WRITE_BARRIER is marked deprecated and WRITE_FLUSH, WRITE_FUA and WRITE_FLUSH_FUA are added. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: drop barrier ordering by queue draining Filesystems will take all the responsibilities for ordering requests around commit writes and will only indicate how the commit writes themselves should be handled by block layers. This patch drops barrier ordering by queue draining from block layer. Ordering by draining implementation was somewhat invasive to request handling. List of notable changes follow. * Each queue has 1 bit color which is flipped on each barrier issue. This is used to track whether a given request is issued before the current barrier or not. REQ_ORDERED_COLOR flag and coloring implementation in __elv_add_request() are removed. * Requests which shouldn't be processed yet for draining were stalled by returning -EAGAIN from blk_do_ordered() according to the test result between blk_ordered_req_seq() and blk_blk_ordered_cur_seq(). This logic is removed. * Draining completion logic in elv_completed_request() removed. * All barrier sequence requests were queued to request queue and then trckled to lower layer according to progress and thus maintaining request orders during requeue was necessary. This is replaced by queueing the next request in the barrier sequence only after the current one is complete from blk_ordered_complete_seq(), which removes the need for multiple proxy requests in struct request_queue and the request sorting logic in the ELEVATOR_INSERT_REQUEUE path of elv_insert(). * As barriers no longer have ordering constraints, there's no need to dump the whole elevator onto the dispatch queue on each barrier. Insert barriers at the front instead. * If other barrier requests come to the front of the dispatch queue while one is already in progress, they are stored in q->pending_barriers and restored to dispatch queue one-by-one after each barrier completion from blk_ordered_complete_seq(). Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
blk-mq: new multi-queue block IO queueing mechanism Linux currently has two models for block devices: - The classic request_fn based approach, where drivers use struct request units for IO. The block layer provides various helper functionalities to let drivers share code, things like tag management, timeout handling, queueing, etc. - The "stacked" approach, where a driver squeezes in between the block layer and IO submitter. Since this bypasses the IO stack, driver generally have to manage everything themselves. With drivers being written for new high IOPS devices, the classic request_fn based driver doesn't work well enough. The design dates back to when both SMP and high IOPS was rare. It has problems with scaling to bigger machines, and runs into scaling issues even on smaller machines when you have IOPS in the hundreds of thousands per device. The stacked approach is then most often selected as the model for the driver. But this means that everybody has to re-invent everything, and along with that we get all the problems again that the shared approach solved. This commit introduces blk-mq, block multi queue support. The design is centered around per-cpu queues for queueing IO, which then funnel down into x number of hardware submission queues. We might have a 1:1 mapping between the two, or it might be an N:M mapping. That all depends on what the hardware supports. blk-mq provides various helper functions, which include: - Scalable support for request tagging. Most devices need to be able to uniquely identify a request both in the driver and to the hardware. The tagging uses per-cpu caches for freed tags, to enable cache hot reuse. - Timeout handling without tracking request on a per-device basis. Basically the driver should be able to get a notification, if a request happens to fail. - Optional support for non 1:1 mappings between issue and submission queues. blk-mq can redirect IO completions to the desired location. - Support for per-request payloads. Drivers almost always need to associate a request structure with some driver private command structure. Drivers can tell blk-mq this at init time, and then any request handed to the driver will have the required size of memory associated with it. - Support for merging of IO, and plugging. The stacked model gets neither of these. Even for high IOPS devices, merging sequential IO reduces per-command overhead and thus increases bandwidth. For now, this is provided as a potential 3rd queueing model, with the hope being that, as it matures, it can replace both the classic and stacked model. That would get us back to having just 1 real model for block devices, leaving the stacked approach to dm/md devices (as it was originally intended). Contributions in this patch from the following people: Shaohua Li <shli@fusionio.com> Alexander Gordeev <agordeev@redhat.com> Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu> Matias Bjorling <m@bjorling.me> Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Acked-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
8 years ago
  1. /*
  2. * Functions to sequence FLUSH and FUA writes.
  3. *
  4. * Copyright (C) 2011 Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics
  5. * Copyright (C) 2011 Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
  6. *
  7. * This file is released under the GPLv2.
  8. *
  9. * REQ_{FLUSH|FUA} requests are decomposed to sequences consisted of three
  10. * optional steps - PREFLUSH, DATA and POSTFLUSH - according to the request
  11. * properties and hardware capability.
  12. *
  13. * If a request doesn't have data, only REQ_FLUSH makes sense, which
  14. * indicates a simple flush request. If there is data, REQ_FLUSH indicates
  15. * that the device cache should be flushed before the data is executed, and
  16. * REQ_FUA means that the data must be on non-volatile media on request
  17. * completion.
  18. *
  19. * If the device doesn't have writeback cache, FLUSH and FUA don't make any
  20. * difference. The requests are either completed immediately if there's no
  21. * data or executed as normal requests otherwise.
  22. *
  23. * If the device has writeback cache and supports FUA, REQ_FLUSH is
  24. * translated to PREFLUSH but REQ_FUA is passed down directly with DATA.
  25. *
  26. * If the device has writeback cache and doesn't support FUA, REQ_FLUSH is
  27. * translated to PREFLUSH and REQ_FUA to POSTFLUSH.
  28. *
  29. * The actual execution of flush is double buffered. Whenever a request
  30. * needs to execute PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues at
  31. * q->flush_queue[q->flush_pending_idx]. Once certain criteria are met, a
  32. * flush is issued and the pending_idx is toggled. When the flush
  33. * completes, all the requests which were pending are proceeded to the next
  34. * step. This allows arbitrary merging of different types of FLUSH/FUA
  35. * requests.
  36. *
  37. * Currently, the following conditions are used to determine when to issue
  38. * flush.
  39. *
  40. * C1. At any given time, only one flush shall be in progress. This makes
  41. * double buffering sufficient.
  42. *
  43. * C2. Flush is deferred if any request is executing DATA of its sequence.
  44. * This avoids issuing separate POSTFLUSHes for requests which shared
  45. * PREFLUSH.
  46. *
  47. * C3. The second condition is ignored if there is a request which has
  48. * waited longer than FLUSH_PENDING_TIMEOUT. This is to avoid
  49. * starvation in the unlikely case where there are continuous stream of
  50. * FUA (without FLUSH) requests.
  51. *
  52. * For devices which support FUA, it isn't clear whether C2 (and thus C3)
  53. * is beneficial.
  54. *
  55. * Note that a sequenced FLUSH/FUA request with DATA is completed twice.
  56. * Once while executing DATA and again after the whole sequence is
  57. * complete. The first completion updates the contained bio but doesn't
  58. * finish it so that the bio submitter is notified only after the whole
  59. * sequence is complete. This is implemented by testing REQ_FLUSH_SEQ in
  60. * req_bio_endio().
  61. *
  62. * The above peculiarity requires that each FLUSH/FUA request has only one
  63. * bio attached to it, which is guaranteed as they aren't allowed to be
  64. * merged in the usual way.
  65. */
  66. #include <linux/kernel.h>
  67. #include <linux/module.h>
  68. #include <linux/bio.h>
  69. #include <linux/blkdev.h>
  70. #include <linux/gfp.h>
  71. #include <linux/blk-mq.h>
  72. #include "blk.h"
  73. #include "blk-mq.h"
  74. /* FLUSH/FUA sequences */
  75. enum {
  76. REQ_FSEQ_PREFLUSH = (1 << 0), /* pre-flushing in progress */
  77. REQ_FSEQ_DATA = (1 << 1), /* data write in progress */
  78. REQ_FSEQ_POSTFLUSH = (1 << 2), /* post-flushing in progress */
  79. REQ_FSEQ_DONE = (1 << 3),
  80. REQ_FSEQ_ACTIONS = REQ_FSEQ_PREFLUSH | REQ_FSEQ_DATA |
  81. REQ_FSEQ_POSTFLUSH,
  82. /*
  83. * If flush has been pending longer than the following timeout,
  84. * it's issued even if flush_data requests are still in flight.
  85. */
  86. FLUSH_PENDING_TIMEOUT = 5 * HZ,
  87. };
  88. static bool blk_kick_flush(struct request_queue *q);
  89. static unsigned int blk_flush_policy(unsigned int fflags, struct request *rq)
  90. {
  91. unsigned int policy = 0;
  92. if (blk_rq_sectors(rq))
  93. policy |= REQ_FSEQ_DATA;
  94. if (fflags & REQ_FLUSH) {
  95. if (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FLUSH)
  96. policy |= REQ_FSEQ_PREFLUSH;
  97. if (!(fflags & REQ_FUA) && (rq->cmd_flags & REQ_FUA))
  98. policy |= REQ_FSEQ_POSTFLUSH;
  99. }
  100. return policy;
  101. }
  102. static unsigned int blk_flush_cur_seq(struct request *rq)
  103. {
  104. return 1 << ffz(rq->flush.seq);
  105. }
  106. static void blk_flush_restore_request(struct request *rq)
  107. {
  108. /*
  109. * After flush data completion, @rq->bio is %NULL but we need to
  110. * complete the bio again. @rq->biotail is guaranteed to equal the
  111. * original @rq->bio. Restore it.
  112. */
  113. rq->bio = rq->biotail;
  114. /* make @rq a normal request */
  115. rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FLUSH_SEQ;
  116. rq->end_io = rq->flush.saved_end_io;
  117. blk_clear_rq_complete(rq);
  118. }
  119. static void mq_flush_data_run(struct work_struct *work)
  120. {
  121. struct request *rq;
  122. rq = container_of(work, struct request, mq_flush_data);
  123. memset(&rq->csd, 0, sizeof(rq->csd));
  124. blk_mq_run_request(rq, true, false);
  125. }
  126. static void blk_mq_flush_data_insert(struct request *rq)
  127. {
  128. INIT_WORK(&rq->mq_flush_data, mq_flush_data_run);
  129. kblockd_schedule_work(rq->q, &rq->mq_flush_data);
  130. }
  131. /**
  132. * blk_flush_complete_seq - complete flush sequence
  133. * @rq: FLUSH/FUA request being sequenced
  134. * @seq: sequences to complete (mask of %REQ_FSEQ_*, can be zero)
  135. * @error: whether an error occurred
  136. *
  137. * @rq just completed @seq part of its flush sequence, record the
  138. * completion and trigger the next step.
  139. *
  140. * CONTEXT:
  141. * spin_lock_irq(q->queue_lock or q->mq_flush_lock)
  142. *
  143. * RETURNS:
  144. * %true if requests were added to the dispatch queue, %false otherwise.
  145. */
  146. static bool blk_flush_complete_seq(struct request *rq, unsigned int seq,
  147. int error)
  148. {
  149. struct request_queue *q = rq->q;
  150. struct list_head *pending = &q->flush_queue[q->flush_pending_idx];
  151. bool queued = false, kicked;
  152. BUG_ON(rq->flush.seq & seq);
  153. rq->flush.seq |= seq;
  154. if (likely(!error))
  155. seq = blk_flush_cur_seq(rq);
  156. else
  157. seq = REQ_FSEQ_DONE;
  158. switch (seq) {
  159. case REQ_FSEQ_PREFLUSH:
  160. case REQ_FSEQ_POSTFLUSH:
  161. /* queue for flush */
  162. if (list_empty(pending))
  163. q->flush_pending_since = jiffies;
  164. list_move_tail(&rq->flush.list, pending);
  165. break;
  166. case REQ_FSEQ_DATA:
  167. list_move_tail(&rq->flush.list, &q->flush_data_in_flight);
  168. if (q->mq_ops)
  169. blk_mq_flush_data_insert(rq);
  170. else {
  171. list_add(&rq->queuelist, &q->queue_head);
  172. queued = true;
  173. }
  174. break;
  175. case REQ_FSEQ_DONE:
  176. /*
  177. * @rq was previously adjusted by blk_flush_issue() for
  178. * flush sequencing and may already have gone through the
  179. * flush data request completion path. Restore @rq for
  180. * normal completion and end it.
  181. */
  182. BUG_ON(!list_empty(&rq->queuelist));
  183. list_del_init(&rq->flush.list);
  184. blk_flush_restore_request(rq);
  185. if (q->mq_ops)
  186. blk_mq_end_io(rq, error);
  187. else
  188. __blk_end_request_all(rq, error);
  189. break;
  190. default:
  191. BUG();
  192. }
  193. kicked = blk_kick_flush(q);
  194. /* blk_mq_run_flush will run queue */
  195. if (q->mq_ops)
  196. return queued;
  197. return kicked | queued;
  198. }
  199. static void flush_end_io(struct request *flush_rq, int error)
  200. {
  201. struct request_queue *q = flush_rq->q;
  202. struct list_head *running;
  203. bool queued = false;
  204. struct request *rq, *n;
  205. unsigned long flags = 0;
  206. if (q->mq_ops) {
  207. blk_mq_free_request(flush_rq);
  208. spin_lock_irqsave(&q->mq_flush_lock, flags);
  209. }
  210. running = &q->flush_queue[q->flush_running_idx];
  211. BUG_ON(q->flush_pending_idx == q->flush_running_idx);
  212. /* account completion of the flush request */
  213. q->flush_running_idx ^= 1;
  214. if (!q->mq_ops)
  215. elv_completed_request(q, flush_rq);
  216. /* and push the waiting requests to the next stage */
  217. list_for_each_entry_safe(rq, n, running, flush.list) {
  218. unsigned int seq = blk_flush_cur_seq(rq);
  219. BUG_ON(seq != REQ_FSEQ_PREFLUSH && seq != REQ_FSEQ_POSTFLUSH);
  220. queued |= blk_flush_complete_seq(rq, seq, error);
  221. }
  222. /*
  223. * Kick the queue to avoid stall for two cases:
  224. * 1. Moving a request silently to empty queue_head may stall the
  225. * queue.
  226. * 2. When flush request is running in non-queueable queue, the
  227. * queue is hold. Restart the queue after flush request is finished
  228. * to avoid stall.
  229. * This function is called from request completion path and calling
  230. * directly into request_fn may confuse the driver. Always use
  231. * kblockd.
  232. */
  233. if (queued || q->flush_queue_delayed) {
  234. if (!q->mq_ops)
  235. blk_run_queue_async(q);
  236. else
  237. /*
  238. * This can be optimized to only run queues with requests
  239. * queued if necessary.
  240. */
  241. blk_mq_run_queues(q, true);
  242. }
  243. q->flush_queue_delayed = 0;
  244. if (q->mq_ops)
  245. spin_unlock_irqrestore(&q->mq_flush_lock, flags);
  246. }
  247. static void mq_flush_work(struct work_struct *work)
  248. {
  249. struct request_queue *q;
  250. struct request *rq;
  251. q = container_of(work, struct request_queue, mq_flush_work);
  252. /* We don't need set REQ_FLUSH_SEQ, it's for consistency */
  253. rq = blk_mq_alloc_request(q, WRITE_FLUSH|REQ_FLUSH_SEQ,
  254. __GFP_WAIT|GFP_ATOMIC, true);
  255. rq->cmd_type = REQ_TYPE_FS;
  256. rq->end_io = flush_end_io;
  257. blk_mq_run_request(rq, true, false);
  258. }
  259. /*
  260. * We can't directly use q->flush_rq, because it doesn't have tag and is not in
  261. * hctx->rqs[]. so we must allocate a new request, since we can't sleep here,
  262. * so offload the work to workqueue.
  263. *
  264. * Note: we assume a flush request finished in any hardware queue will flush
  265. * the whole disk cache.
  266. */
  267. static void mq_run_flush(struct request_queue *q)
  268. {
  269. kblockd_schedule_work(q, &q->mq_flush_work);
  270. }
  271. /**
  272. * blk_kick_flush - consider issuing flush request
  273. * @q: request_queue being kicked
  274. *
  275. * Flush related states of @q have changed, consider issuing flush request.
  276. * Please read the comment at the top of this file for more info.
  277. *
  278. * CONTEXT:
  279. * spin_lock_irq(q->queue_lock or q->mq_flush_lock)
  280. *
  281. * RETURNS:
  282. * %true if flush was issued, %false otherwise.
  283. */
  284. static bool blk_kick_flush(struct request_queue *q)
  285. {
  286. struct list_head *pending = &q->flush_queue[q->flush_pending_idx];
  287. struct request *first_rq =
  288. list_first_entry(pending, struct request, flush.list);
  289. /* C1 described at the top of this file */
  290. if (q->flush_pending_idx != q->flush_running_idx || list_empty(pending))
  291. return false;
  292. /* C2 and C3 */
  293. if (!list_empty(&q->flush_data_in_flight) &&
  294. time_before(jiffies,
  295. q->flush_pending_since + FLUSH_PENDING_TIMEOUT))
  296. return false;
  297. /*
  298. * Issue flush and toggle pending_idx. This makes pending_idx
  299. * different from running_idx, which means flush is in flight.
  300. */
  301. q->flush_pending_idx ^= 1;
  302. if (q->mq_ops) {
  303. mq_run_flush(q);
  304. return true;
  305. }
  306. blk_rq_init(q, &q->flush_rq);
  307. q->flush_rq.cmd_type = REQ_TYPE_FS;
  308. q->flush_rq.cmd_flags = WRITE_FLUSH | REQ_FLUSH_SEQ;
  309. q->flush_rq.rq_disk = first_rq->rq_disk;
  310. q->flush_rq.end_io = flush_end_io;
  311. list_add_tail(&q->flush_rq.queuelist, &q->queue_head);
  312. return true;
  313. }
  314. static void flush_data_end_io(struct request *rq, int error)
  315. {
  316. struct request_queue *q = rq->q;
  317. /*
  318. * After populating an empty queue, kick it to avoid stall. Read
  319. * the comment in flush_end_io().
  320. */
  321. if (blk_flush_complete_seq(rq, REQ_FSEQ_DATA, error))
  322. blk_run_queue_async(q);
  323. }
  324. static void mq_flush_data_end_io(struct request *rq, int error)
  325. {
  326. struct request_queue *q = rq->q;
  327. struct blk_mq_hw_ctx *hctx;
  328. struct blk_mq_ctx *ctx;
  329. unsigned long flags;
  330. ctx = rq->mq_ctx;
  331. hctx = q->mq_ops->map_queue(q, ctx->cpu);
  332. /*
  333. * After populating an empty queue, kick it to avoid stall. Read
  334. * the comment in flush_end_io().
  335. */
  336. spin_lock_irqsave(&q->mq_flush_lock, flags);
  337. if (blk_flush_complete_seq(rq, REQ_FSEQ_DATA, error))
  338. blk_mq_run_hw_queue(hctx, true);
  339. spin_unlock_irqrestore(&q->mq_flush_lock, flags);
  340. }
  341. /**
  342. * blk_insert_flush - insert a new FLUSH/FUA request
  343. * @rq: request to insert
  344. *
  345. * To be called from __elv_add_request() for %ELEVATOR_INSERT_FLUSH insertions.
  346. * or __blk_mq_run_hw_queue() to dispatch request.
  347. * @rq is being submitted. Analyze what needs to be done and put it on the
  348. * right queue.
  349. *
  350. * CONTEXT:
  351. * spin_lock_irq(q->queue_lock) in !mq case
  352. */
  353. void blk_insert_flush(struct request *rq)
  354. {
  355. struct request_queue *q = rq->q;
  356. unsigned int fflags = q->flush_flags; /* may change, cache */
  357. unsigned int policy = blk_flush_policy(fflags, rq);
  358. /*
  359. * @policy now records what operations need to be done. Adjust
  360. * REQ_FLUSH and FUA for the driver.
  361. */
  362. rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FLUSH;
  363. if (!(fflags & REQ_FUA))
  364. rq->cmd_flags &= ~REQ_FUA;
  365. /*
  366. * An empty flush handed down from a stacking driver may
  367. * translate into nothing if the underlying device does not
  368. * advertise a write-back cache. In this case, simply
  369. * complete the request.
  370. */
  371. if (!policy) {
  372. if (q->mq_ops)
  373. blk_mq_end_io(rq, 0);
  374. else
  375. __blk_end_bidi_request(rq, 0, 0, 0);
  376. return;
  377. }
  378. BUG_ON(rq->bio != rq->biotail); /*assumes zero or single bio rq */
  379. /*
  380. * If there's data but flush is not necessary, the request can be
  381. * processed directly without going through flush machinery. Queue
  382. * for normal execution.
  383. */
  384. if ((policy & REQ_FSEQ_DATA) &&
  385. !(policy & (REQ_FSEQ_PREFLUSH | REQ_FSEQ_POSTFLUSH))) {
  386. if (q->mq_ops) {
  387. blk_mq_run_request(rq, false, true);
  388. } else
  389. list_add_tail(&rq->queuelist, &q->queue_head);
  390. return;
  391. }
  392. /*
  393. * @rq should go through flush machinery. Mark it part of flush
  394. * sequence and submit for further processing.
  395. */
  396. memset(&rq->flush, 0, sizeof(rq->flush));
  397. INIT_LIST_HEAD(&rq->flush.list);
  398. rq->cmd_flags |= REQ_FLUSH_SEQ;
  399. rq->flush.saved_end_io = rq->end_io; /* Usually NULL */
  400. if (q->mq_ops) {
  401. rq->end_io = mq_flush_data_end_io;
  402. spin_lock_irq(&q->mq_flush_lock);
  403. blk_flush_complete_seq(rq, REQ_FSEQ_ACTIONS & ~policy, 0);
  404. spin_unlock_irq(&q->mq_flush_lock);
  405. return;
  406. }
  407. rq->end_io = flush_data_end_io;
  408. blk_flush_complete_seq(rq, REQ_FSEQ_ACTIONS & ~policy, 0);
  409. }
  410. /**
  411. * blk_abort_flushes - @q is being aborted, abort flush requests
  412. * @q: request_queue being aborted
  413. *
  414. * To be called from elv_abort_queue(). @q is being aborted. Prepare all
  415. * FLUSH/FUA requests for abortion.
  416. *
  417. * CONTEXT:
  418. * spin_lock_irq(q->queue_lock)
  419. */
  420. void blk_abort_flushes(struct request_queue *q)
  421. {
  422. struct request *rq, *n;
  423. int i;
  424. /*
  425. * Requests in flight for data are already owned by the dispatch
  426. * queue or the device driver. Just restore for normal completion.
  427. */
  428. list_for_each_entry_safe(rq, n, &q->flush_data_in_flight, flush.list) {
  429. list_del_init(&rq->flush.list);
  430. blk_flush_restore_request(rq);
  431. }
  432. /*
  433. * We need to give away requests on flush queues. Restore for
  434. * normal completion and put them on the dispatch queue.
  435. */
  436. for (i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE(q->flush_queue); i++) {
  437. list_for_each_entry_safe(rq, n, &q->flush_queue[i],
  438. flush.list) {
  439. list_del_init(&rq->flush.list);
  440. blk_flush_restore_request(rq);
  441. list_add_tail(&rq->queuelist, &q->queue_head);
  442. }
  443. }
  444. }
  445. /**
  446. * blkdev_issue_flush - queue a flush
  447. * @bdev: blockdev to issue flush for
  448. * @gfp_mask: memory allocation flags (for bio_alloc)
  449. * @error_sector: error sector
  450. *
  451. * Description:
  452. * Issue a flush for the block device in question. Caller can supply
  453. * room for storing the error offset in case of a flush error, if they
  454. * wish to. If WAIT flag is not passed then caller may check only what
  455. * request was pushed in some internal queue for later handling.
  456. */
  457. int blkdev_issue_flush(struct block_device *bdev, gfp_t gfp_mask,
  458. sector_t *error_sector)
  459. {
  460. struct request_queue *q;
  461. struct bio *bio;
  462. int ret = 0;
  463. if (bdev->bd_disk == NULL)
  464. return -ENXIO;
  465. q = bdev_get_queue(bdev);
  466. if (!q)
  467. return -ENXIO;
  468. /*
  469. * some block devices may not have their queue correctly set up here
  470. * (e.g. loop device without a backing file) and so issuing a flush
  471. * here will panic. Ensure there is a request function before issuing
  472. * the flush.
  473. */
  474. if (!q->make_request_fn)
  475. return -ENXIO;
  476. bio = bio_alloc(gfp_mask, 0);
  477. bio->bi_bdev = bdev;
  478. ret = submit_bio_wait(WRITE_FLUSH, bio);
  479. /*
  480. * The driver must store the error location in ->bi_sector, if
  481. * it supports it. For non-stacked drivers, this should be
  482. * copied from blk_rq_pos(rq).
  483. */
  484. if (error_sector)
  485. *error_sector = bio->bi_sector;
  486. bio_put(bio);
  487. return ret;
  488. }
  489. EXPORT_SYMBOL(blkdev_issue_flush);
  490. void blk_mq_init_flush(struct request_queue *q)
  491. {
  492. spin_lock_init(&q->mq_flush_lock);
  493. INIT_WORK(&q->mq_flush_work, mq_flush_work);
  494. }