original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
You can not select more than 25 topics Topics must start with a letter or number, can include dashes ('-') and can be up to 35 characters long.

1868 lines
60 KiB

[PATCH] uml: use DEFCONFIG_LIST to avoid reading host's config This should make sure that, for UML, host's configuration files are not considered, which avoids various pains to the user. Our dependency are such that the obtained Kconfig will be valid and will lead to successful compilation - however they cannot prevent an user from disabling any boot device, and if an option is not set in the read .config (say /boot/config-XXX), with make menuconfig ARCH=um, it is not set. This always disables UBD and all console I/O channels, which leads to non-working UML kernels, so this bothers users - especially now, since it will happen on almost every machine (/boot/config-`uname -r` exists almost on every machine). It can be workarounded with make defconfig ARCH=um, but it is non-obvious and can be avoided, so please _do_ merge this patch. Given the existence of options, it could be interesting to implement (additionally) "option required" - with it, Kconfig will refuse reading a .config file (from wherever it comes) if the given option is not set. With this, one could mark with it the option characteristic of the given architecture (it was an old proposal of Roman Zippel, when I pointed out our problem): config UML option required default y However this should be further discussed: *) for x86, it must support constructs like: ==arch/i386/Kconfig== config 64BIT option required default n where Kconfig must require that CONFIG_64BIT is disabled or not present in the read .config. *) do we want to do such checks only for the starting defconfig or also for .config? Which leads to: *) I may want to port a x86_64 .config to x86 and viceversa, or even among more different archs. Should that be allowed, and in which measure (the user may force skipping the check for a .config or it is only given a warning by default)? Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: <kbuild-devel@lists.sourceforge.net> Signed-off-by: Paolo 'Blaisorblade' Giarrusso <blaisorblade@yahoo.it> Cc: Jeff Dike <jdike@addtoit.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
build some drivers only when compile-testing Some drivers can be built on more platforms than they run on. This is a burden for users and distributors who package a kernel. They have to manually deselect some (for them useless) drivers when updating their configs via oldconfig. And yet, sometimes it is even impossible to disable the drivers without patching the kernel. Introduce a new config option COMPILE_TEST and make all those drivers to depend on the platform they run on, or on the COMPILE_TEST option. Now, when users/distributors choose COMPILE_TEST=n they will not have the drivers in their allmodconfig setups, but developers still can compile-test them with COMPILE_TEST=y. Now the drivers where we use this new option: * PTP_1588_CLOCK_PCH: The PCH EG20T is only compatible with Intel Atom processors so it should depend on x86. * FB_GEODE: Geode is 32-bit only so only enable it for X86_32. * USB_CHIPIDEA_IMX: The OF_DEVICE dependency will be met on powerpc systems -- which do not actually support the hardware via that method. * INTEL_MID_PTI: It is specific to the Penwell type of Intel Atom device. [v2] * remove EXPERT dependency [gregkh - remove chipidea portion, as it's incorrect, and also doesn't apply to my driver-core tree] Signed-off-by: Jiri Slaby <jslaby@suse.cz> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Jeff Mahoney <jeffm@suse.com> Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com> Cc: linux-usb@vger.kernel.org Cc: Florian Tobias Schandinat <FlorianSchandinat@gmx.de> Cc: linux-geode@lists.infradead.org Cc: linux-fbdev@vger.kernel.org Cc: Richard Cochran <richardcochran@gmail.com> Cc: netdev@vger.kernel.org Cc: Ben Hutchings <ben@decadent.org.uk> Cc: "Keller, Jacob E" <jacob.e.keller@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
8 years ago
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
[PATCH] BLOCK: Make it possible to disable the block layer [try #6] Make it possible to disable the block layer. Not all embedded devices require it, some can make do with just JFFS2, NFS, ramfs, etc - none of which require the block layer to be present. This patch does the following: (*) Introduces CONFIG_BLOCK to disable the block layer, buffering and blockdev support. (*) Adds dependencies on CONFIG_BLOCK to any configuration item that controls an item that uses the block layer. This includes: (*) Block I/O tracing. (*) Disk partition code. (*) All filesystems that are block based, eg: Ext3, ReiserFS, ISOFS. (*) The SCSI layer. As far as I can tell, even SCSI chardevs use the block layer to do scheduling. Some drivers that use SCSI facilities - such as USB storage - end up disabled indirectly from this. (*) Various block-based device drivers, such as IDE and the old CDROM drivers. (*) MTD blockdev handling and FTL. (*) JFFS - which uses set_bdev_super(), something it could avoid doing by taking a leaf out of JFFS2's book. (*) Makes most of the contents of linux/blkdev.h, linux/buffer_head.h and linux/elevator.h contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK being set. sector_div() is, however, still used in places, and so is still available. (*) Also made contingent are the contents of linux/mpage.h, linux/genhd.h and parts of linux/fs.h. (*) Makes a number of files in fs/ contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) Makes mm/bounce.c (bounce buffering) contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) set_page_dirty() doesn't call __set_page_dirty_buffers() if CONFIG_BLOCK is not enabled. (*) fs/no-block.c is created to hold out-of-line stubs and things that are required when CONFIG_BLOCK is not set: (*) Default blockdev file operations (to give error ENODEV on opening). (*) Makes some /proc changes: (*) /proc/devices does not list any blockdevs. (*) /proc/diskstats and /proc/partitions are contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) Makes some compat ioctl handling contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) If CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined, makes sys_quotactl() return -ENODEV if given command other than Q_SYNC or if a special device is specified. (*) In init/do_mounts.c, no reference is made to the blockdev routines if CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined. This does not prohibit NFS roots or JFFS2. (*) The bdflush, ioprio_set and ioprio_get syscalls can now be absent (return error ENOSYS by way of cond_syscall if so). (*) The seclvl_bd_claim() and seclvl_bd_release() security calls do nothing if CONFIG_BLOCK is not set, since they can't then happen. Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
15 years ago
cputime: Generic on-demand virtual cputime accounting If we want to stop the tick further idle, we need to be able to account the cputime without using the tick. Virtual based cputime accounting solves that problem by hooking into kernel/user boundaries. However implementing CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING require low level hooks and involves more overhead. But we already have a generic context tracking subsystem that is required for RCU needs by archs which plan to shut down the tick outside idle. This patch implements a generic virtual based cputime accounting that relies on these generic kernel/user hooks. There are some upsides of doing this: - This requires no arch code to implement CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING if context tracking is already built (already necessary for RCU in full tickless mode). - We can rely on the generic context tracking subsystem to dynamically (de)activate the hooks, so that we can switch anytime between virtual and tick based accounting. This way we don't have the overhead of the virtual accounting when the tick is running periodically. And one downside: - There is probably more overhead than a native virtual based cputime accounting. But this relies on hooks that are already set anyway. Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung.kim@lge.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
nohz: Select VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN from full dynticks config Turn the full dynticks passive dependency on VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN to an active one. The full dynticks Kconfig is currently hidden behind the full dynticks cputime accounting, which is an awkward and counter-intuitive layout: the user first has to select the dynticks cputime accounting in order to make the full dynticks feature to be visible. We definetly want it the other way around. The usual way to perform this kind of active dependency is use "select" on the depended target. Now we can't use the Kconfig "select" instruction when the target is a "choice". So this patch inspires on how the RCU subsystem Kconfig interact with its dependencies on SMP and PREEMPT: we make sure that cputime accounting can't propose another option than VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN when NO_HZ_FULL is selected by using the right "depends on" instruction for each cputime accounting choices. v2: Keep full dynticks cputime accounting available even without full dynticks, as per Paul McKenney's suggestion. Reported-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Hakan Akkan <hakanakkan@gmail.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Kevin Hilman <khilman@linaro.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
cputime: Generic on-demand virtual cputime accounting If we want to stop the tick further idle, we need to be able to account the cputime without using the tick. Virtual based cputime accounting solves that problem by hooking into kernel/user boundaries. However implementing CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING require low level hooks and involves more overhead. But we already have a generic context tracking subsystem that is required for RCU needs by archs which plan to shut down the tick outside idle. This patch implements a generic virtual based cputime accounting that relies on these generic kernel/user hooks. There are some upsides of doing this: - This requires no arch code to implement CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING if context tracking is already built (already necessary for RCU in full tickless mode). - We can rely on the generic context tracking subsystem to dynamically (de)activate the hooks, so that we can switch anytime between virtual and tick based accounting. This way we don't have the overhead of the virtual accounting when the tick is running periodically. And one downside: - There is probably more overhead than a native virtual based cputime accounting. But this relies on hooks that are already set anyway. Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung.kim@lge.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
nohz: Select VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN from full dynticks config Turn the full dynticks passive dependency on VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN to an active one. The full dynticks Kconfig is currently hidden behind the full dynticks cputime accounting, which is an awkward and counter-intuitive layout: the user first has to select the dynticks cputime accounting in order to make the full dynticks feature to be visible. We definetly want it the other way around. The usual way to perform this kind of active dependency is use "select" on the depended target. Now we can't use the Kconfig "select" instruction when the target is a "choice". So this patch inspires on how the RCU subsystem Kconfig interact with its dependencies on SMP and PREEMPT: we make sure that cputime accounting can't propose another option than VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN when NO_HZ_FULL is selected by using the right "depends on" instruction for each cputime accounting choices. v2: Keep full dynticks cputime accounting available even without full dynticks, as per Paul McKenney's suggestion. Reported-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Hakan Akkan <hakanakkan@gmail.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Kevin Hilman <khilman@linaro.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
cputime: Generic on-demand virtual cputime accounting If we want to stop the tick further idle, we need to be able to account the cputime without using the tick. Virtual based cputime accounting solves that problem by hooking into kernel/user boundaries. However implementing CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING require low level hooks and involves more overhead. But we already have a generic context tracking subsystem that is required for RCU needs by archs which plan to shut down the tick outside idle. This patch implements a generic virtual based cputime accounting that relies on these generic kernel/user hooks. There are some upsides of doing this: - This requires no arch code to implement CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING if context tracking is already built (already necessary for RCU in full tickless mode). - We can rely on the generic context tracking subsystem to dynamically (de)activate the hooks, so that we can switch anytime between virtual and tick based accounting. This way we don't have the overhead of the virtual accounting when the tick is running periodically. And one downside: - There is probably more overhead than a native virtual based cputime accounting. But this relies on hooks that are already set anyway. Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung.kim@lge.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
cputime: Generic on-demand virtual cputime accounting If we want to stop the tick further idle, we need to be able to account the cputime without using the tick. Virtual based cputime accounting solves that problem by hooking into kernel/user boundaries. However implementing CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING require low level hooks and involves more overhead. But we already have a generic context tracking subsystem that is required for RCU needs by archs which plan to shut down the tick outside idle. This patch implements a generic virtual based cputime accounting that relies on these generic kernel/user hooks. There are some upsides of doing this: - This requires no arch code to implement CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING if context tracking is already built (already necessary for RCU in full tickless mode). - We can rely on the generic context tracking subsystem to dynamically (de)activate the hooks, so that we can switch anytime between virtual and tick based accounting. This way we don't have the overhead of the virtual accounting when the tick is running periodically. And one downside: - There is probably more overhead than a native virtual based cputime accounting. But this relies on hooks that are already set anyway. Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung.kim@lge.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
cputime: Generic on-demand virtual cputime accounting If we want to stop the tick further idle, we need to be able to account the cputime without using the tick. Virtual based cputime accounting solves that problem by hooking into kernel/user boundaries. However implementing CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING require low level hooks and involves more overhead. But we already have a generic context tracking subsystem that is required for RCU needs by archs which plan to shut down the tick outside idle. This patch implements a generic virtual based cputime accounting that relies on these generic kernel/user hooks. There are some upsides of doing this: - This requires no arch code to implement CONFIG_VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING if context tracking is already built (already necessary for RCU in full tickless mode). - We can rely on the generic context tracking subsystem to dynamically (de)activate the hooks, so that we can switch anytime between virtual and tick based accounting. This way we don't have the overhead of the virtual accounting when the tick is running periodically. And one downside: - There is probably more overhead than a native virtual based cputime accounting. But this relies on hooks that are already set anyway. Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung.kim@lge.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
nohz: Select VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN from full dynticks config Turn the full dynticks passive dependency on VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN to an active one. The full dynticks Kconfig is currently hidden behind the full dynticks cputime accounting, which is an awkward and counter-intuitive layout: the user first has to select the dynticks cputime accounting in order to make the full dynticks feature to be visible. We definetly want it the other way around. The usual way to perform this kind of active dependency is use "select" on the depended target. Now we can't use the Kconfig "select" instruction when the target is a "choice". So this patch inspires on how the RCU subsystem Kconfig interact with its dependencies on SMP and PREEMPT: we make sure that cputime accounting can't propose another option than VIRT_CPU_ACCOUNTING_GEN when NO_HZ_FULL is selected by using the right "depends on" instruction for each cputime accounting choices. v2: Keep full dynticks cputime accounting available even without full dynticks, as per Paul McKenney's suggestion. Reported-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Hakan Akkan <hakanakkan@gmail.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Kevin Hilman <khilman@linaro.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
9 years ago
rcu: Don't call wakeup() with rcu_node structure ->lock held This commit fixes a lockdep-detected deadlock by moving a wake_up() call out from a rnp->lock critical section. Please see below for the long version of this story. On Tue, 2013-05-28 at 16:13 -0400, Dave Jones wrote: > [12572.705832] ====================================================== > [12572.750317] [ INFO: possible circular locking dependency detected ] > [12572.796978] 3.10.0-rc3+ #39 Not tainted > [12572.833381] ------------------------------------------------------- > [12572.862233] trinity-child17/31341 is trying to acquire lock: > [12572.870390] (rcu_node_0){..-.-.}, at: [<ffffffff811054ff>] rcu_read_unlock_special+0x9f/0x4c0 > [12572.878859] > but task is already holding lock: > [12572.894894] (&ctx->lock){-.-...}, at: [<ffffffff811390ed>] perf_lock_task_context+0x7d/0x2d0 > [12572.903381] > which lock already depends on the new lock. > > [12572.927541] > the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is: > [12572.943736] > -> #4 (&ctx->lock){-.-...}: > [12572.960032] [<ffffffff810b9851>] lock_acquire+0x91/0x1f0 > [12572.968337] [<ffffffff816ebc90>] _raw_spin_lock+0x40/0x80 > [12572.976633] [<ffffffff8113c987>] __perf_event_task_sched_out+0x2e7/0x5e0 > [12572.984969] [<ffffffff81088953>] perf_event_task_sched_out+0x93/0xa0 > [12572.993326] [<ffffffff816ea0bf>] __schedule+0x2cf/0x9c0 > [12573.001652] [<ffffffff816eacfe>] schedule_user+0x2e/0x70 > [12573.009998] [<ffffffff816ecd64>] retint_careful+0x12/0x2e > [12573.018321] > -> #3 (&rq->lock){-.-.-.}: > [12573.034628] [<ffffffff810b9851>] lock_acquire+0x91/0x1f0 > [12573.042930] [<ffffffff816ebc90>] _raw_spin_lock+0x40/0x80 > [12573.051248] [<ffffffff8108e6a7>] wake_up_new_task+0xb7/0x260 > [12573.059579] [<ffffffff810492f5>] do_fork+0x105/0x470 > [12573.067880] [<ffffffff81049686>] kernel_thread+0x26/0x30 > [12573.076202] [<ffffffff816cee63>] rest_init+0x23/0x140 > [12573.084508] [<ffffffff81ed8e1f>] start_kernel+0x3f1/0x3fe > [12573.092852] [<ffffffff81ed856f>] x86_64_start_reservations+0x2a/0x2c > [12573.101233] [<ffffffff81ed863d>] x86_64_start_kernel+0xcc/0xcf > [12573.109528] > -> #2 (&p->pi_lock){-.-.-.}: > [12573.125675] [<ffffffff810b9851>] lock_acquire+0x91/0x1f0 > [12573.133829] [<ffffffff816ebe9b>] _raw_spin_lock_irqsave+0x4b/0x90 > [12573.141964] [<ffffffff8108e881>] try_to_wake_up+0x31/0x320 > [12573.150065] [<ffffffff8108ebe2>] default_wake_function+0x12/0x20 > [12573.158151] [<ffffffff8107bbf8>] autoremove_wake_function+0x18/0x40 > [12573.166195] [<ffffffff81085398>] __wake_up_common+0x58/0x90 > [12573.174215] [<ffffffff81086909>] __wake_up+0x39/0x50 > [12573.182146] [<ffffffff810fc3da>] rcu_start_gp_advanced.isra.11+0x4a/0x50 > [12573.190119] [<ffffffff810fdb09>] rcu_start_future_gp+0x1c9/0x1f0 > [12573.198023] [<ffffffff810fe2c4>] rcu_nocb_kthread+0x114/0x930 > [12573.205860] [<ffffffff8107a91d>] kthread+0xed/0x100 > [12573.213656] [<ffffffff816f4b1c>] ret_from_fork+0x7c/0xb0 > [12573.221379] > -> #1 (&rsp->gp_wq){..-.-.}: > [12573.236329] [<ffffffff810b9851>] lock_acquire+0x91/0x1f0 > [12573.243783] [<ffffffff816ebe9b>] _raw_spin_lock_irqsave+0x4b/0x90 > [12573.251178] [<ffffffff810868f3>] __wake_up+0x23/0x50 > [12573.258505] [<ffffffff810fc3da>] rcu_start_gp_advanced.isra.11+0x4a/0x50 > [12573.265891] [<ffffffff810fdb09>] rcu_start_future_gp+0x1c9/0x1f0 > [12573.273248] [<ffffffff810fe2c4>] rcu_nocb_kthread+0x114/0x930 > [12573.280564] [<ffffffff8107a91d>] kthread+0xed/0x100 > [12573.287807] [<ffffffff816f4b1c>] ret_from_fork+0x7c/0xb0 Notice the above call chain. rcu_start_future_gp() is called with the rnp->lock held. Then it calls rcu_start_gp_advance, which does a wakeup. You can't do wakeups while holding the rnp->lock, as that would mean that you could not do a rcu_read_unlock() while holding the rq lock, or any lock that was taken while holding the rq lock. This is because... (See below). > [12573.295067] > -> #0 (rcu_node_0){..-.-.}: > [12573.309293] [<ffffffff810b8d36>] __lock_acquire+0x1786/0x1af0 > [12573.316568] [<ffffffff810b9851>] lock_acquire+0x91/0x1f0 > [12573.323825] [<ffffffff816ebc90>] _raw_spin_lock+0x40/0x80 > [12573.331081] [<ffffffff811054ff>] rcu_read_unlock_special+0x9f/0x4c0 > [12573.338377] [<ffffffff810760a6>] __rcu_read_unlock+0x96/0xa0 > [12573.345648] [<ffffffff811391b3>] perf_lock_task_context+0x143/0x2d0 > [12573.352942] [<ffffffff8113938e>] find_get_context+0x4e/0x1f0 > [12573.360211] [<ffffffff811403f4>] SYSC_perf_event_open+0x514/0xbd0 > [12573.367514] [<ffffffff81140e49>] SyS_perf_event_open+0x9/0x10 > [12573.374816] [<ffffffff816f4dd4>] tracesys+0xdd/0xe2 Notice the above trace. perf took its own ctx->lock, which can be taken while holding the rq lock. While holding this lock, it did a rcu_read_unlock(). The perf_lock_task_context() basically looks like: rcu_read_lock(); raw_spin_lock(ctx->lock); rcu_read_unlock(); Now, what looks to have happened, is that we scheduled after taking that first rcu_read_lock() but before taking the spin lock. When we scheduled back in and took the ctx->lock, the following rcu_read_unlock() triggered the "special" code. The rcu_read_unlock_special() takes the rnp->lock, which gives us a possible deadlock scenario. CPU0 CPU1 CPU2 ---- ---- ---- rcu_nocb_kthread() lock(rq->lock); lock(ctx->lock); lock(rnp->lock); wake_up(); lock(rq->lock); rcu_read_unlock(); rcu_read_unlock_special(); lock(rnp->lock); lock(ctx->lock); **** DEADLOCK **** > [12573.382068] > other info that might help us debug this: > > [12573.403229] Chain exists of: > rcu_node_0 --> &rq->lock --> &ctx->lock > > [12573.424471] Possible unsafe locking scenario: > > [12573.438499] CPU0 CPU1 > [12573.445599] ---- ---- > [12573.452691] lock(&ctx->lock); > [12573.459799] lock(&rq->lock); > [12573.467010] lock(&ctx->lock); > [12573.474192] lock(rcu_node_0); > [12573.481262] > *** DEADLOCK *** > > [12573.501931] 1 lock held by trinity-child17/31341: > [12573.508990] #0: (&ctx->lock){-.-...}, at: [<ffffffff811390ed>] perf_lock_task_context+0x7d/0x2d0 > [12573.516475] > stack backtrace: > [12573.530395] CPU: 1 PID: 31341 Comm: trinity-child17 Not tainted 3.10.0-rc3+ #39 > [12573.545357] ffffffff825b4f90 ffff880219f1dbc0 ffffffff816e375b ffff880219f1dc00 > [12573.552868] ffffffff816dfa5d ffff880219f1dc50 ffff88023ce4d1f8 ffff88023ce4ca40 > [12573.560353] 0000000000000001 0000000000000001 ffff88023ce4d1f8 ffff880219f1dcc0 > [12573.567856] Call Trace: > [12573.575011] [<ffffffff816e375b>] dump_stack+0x19/0x1b > [12573.582284] [<ffffffff816dfa5d>] print_circular_bug+0x200/0x20f > [12573.589637] [<ffffffff810b8d36>] __lock_acquire+0x1786/0x1af0 > [12573.596982] [<ffffffff810918f5>] ? sched_clock_cpu+0xb5/0x100 > [12573.604344] [<ffffffff810b9851>] lock_acquire+0x91/0x1f0 > [12573.611652] [<ffffffff811054ff>] ? rcu_read_unlock_special+0x9f/0x4c0 > [12573.619030] [<ffffffff816ebc90>] _raw_spin_lock+0x40/0x80 > [12573.626331] [<ffffffff811054ff>] ? rcu_read_unlock_special+0x9f/0x4c0 > [12573.633671] [<ffffffff811054ff>] rcu_read_unlock_special+0x9f/0x4c0 > [12573.640992] [<ffffffff811390ed>] ? perf_lock_task_context+0x7d/0x2d0 > [12573.648330] [<ffffffff810b429e>] ? put_lock_stats.isra.29+0xe/0x40 > [12573.655662] [<ffffffff813095a0>] ? delay_tsc+0x90/0xe0 > [12573.662964] [<ffffffff810760a6>] __rcu_read_unlock+0x96/0xa0 > [12573.670276] [<ffffffff811391b3>] perf_lock_task_context+0x143/0x2d0 > [12573.677622] [<ffffffff81139070>] ? __perf_event_enable+0x370/0x370 > [12573.684981] [<ffffffff8113938e>] find_get_context+0x4e/0x1f0 > [12573.692358] [<ffffffff811403f4>] SYSC_perf_event_open+0x514/0xbd0 > [12573.699753] [<ffffffff8108cd9d>] ? get_parent_ip+0xd/0x50 > [12573.707135] [<ffffffff810b71fd>] ? trace_hardirqs_on_caller+0xfd/0x1c0 > [12573.714599] [<ffffffff81140e49>] SyS_perf_event_open+0x9/0x10 > [12573.721996] [<ffffffff816f4dd4>] tracesys+0xdd/0xe2 This commit delays the wakeup via irq_work(), which is what perf and ftrace use to perform wakeups in critical sections. Reported-by: Dave Jones <davej@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
8 years ago
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Add a TINY_PREEMPT_RCU Implement a small-memory-footprint uniprocessor-only implementation of preemptible RCU. This implementation uses but a single blocked-tasks list rather than the combinatorial number used per leaf rcu_node by TREE_PREEMPT_RCU, which reduces memory consumption and greatly simplifies processing. This version also takes advantage of uniprocessor execution to accelerate grace periods in the case where there are no readers. The general design is otherwise broadly similar to that of TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. This implementation is a step towards having RCU implementation driven off of the SMP and PREEMPT kernel configuration variables, which can happen once this implementation has accumulated sufficient experience. Removed ACCESS_ONCE() from __rcu_read_unlock() and added barrier() as suggested by Steve Rostedt in order to avoid the compiler-reordering issue noted by Mathieu Desnoyers (http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/8/16/183). As can be seen below, CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU represents almost 5Kbyte savings compared to CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. Of course, for non-real-time workloads, CONFIG_TINY_RCU is even better. CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 6170 825 28 7023 kernel/rcutree.o ---- 7026 Total CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 2081 81 8 2170 kernel/rcutiny.o ---- 2183 Total CONFIG_TINY_RCU (non-preemptible) text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 719 25 0 744 kernel/rcutiny.o --- 757 Total Requested-by: Loïc Minier <loic.minier@canonical.com> Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
11 years ago
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: "Tiny RCU", The Bloatwatch Edition This patch is a version of RCU designed for !SMP provided for a small-footprint RCU implementation. In particular, the implementation of synchronize_rcu() is extremely lightweight and high performance. It passes rcutorture testing in each of the four relevant configurations (combinations of NO_HZ and PREEMPT) on x86. This saves about 1K bytes compared to old Classic RCU (which is no longer in mainline), and more than three kilobytes compared to Hierarchical RCU (updated to 2.6.30): CONFIG_TREE_RCU: text data bss dec filename 183 4 0 187 kernel/rcupdate.o 2783 520 36 3339 kernel/rcutree.o 3526 Total (vs 4565 for v7) CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU: text data bss dec filename 263 4 0 267 kernel/rcupdate.o 4594 776 52 5422 kernel/rcutree.o 5689 Total (6155 for v7) CONFIG_TINY_RCU: text data bss dec filename 96 4 0 100 kernel/rcupdate.o 734 24 0 758 kernel/rcutiny.o 858 Total (vs 848 for v7) The above is for x86. Your mileage may vary on other platforms. Further compression is possible, but is being procrastinated. Changes from v7 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/10/9/388) o Apply Lai Jiangshan's review comments (aside from might_sleep() in synchronize_sched(), which is covered by SMP builds). o Fix up expedited primitives. Changes from v6 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/9/23/293). o Forward ported to put it into the 2.6.33 stream. o Added lockdep support. o Make lightweight rcu_barrier. Changes from v5 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/6/23/12). o Ported to latest pre-2.6.32 merge window kernel. - Renamed rcu_qsctr_inc() to rcu_sched_qs(). - Renamed rcu_bh_qsctr_inc() to rcu_bh_qs(). - Provided trivial rcu_cpu_notify(). - Provided trivial exit_rcu(). - Provided trivial rcu_needs_cpu(). - Fixed up the rcu_*_enter/exit() functions in linux/hardirq.h. o Removed the dependence on EMBEDDED, with a view to making TINY_RCU default for !SMP at some time in the future. o Added (trivial) support for expedited grace periods. Changes from v4 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/5/2/91) include: o Squeeze the size down a bit further by removing the ->completed field from struct rcu_ctrlblk. o This permits synchronize_rcu() to become the empty function. Previous concerns about rcutorture were unfounded, as rcutorture correctly handles a constant value from rcu_batches_completed() and rcu_batches_completed_bh(). Changes from v3 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/3/29/221) include: o Changed rcu_batches_completed(), rcu_batches_completed_bh() rcu_enter_nohz(), rcu_exit_nohz(), rcu_nmi_enter(), and rcu_nmi_exit(), to be static inlines, as suggested by David Howells. Doing this saves about 100 bytes from rcutiny.o. (The numbers between v3 and this v4 of the patch are not directly comparable, since they are against different versions of Linux.) Changes from v2 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/2/3/333) include: o Fix whitespace issues. o Change short-circuit "||" operator to instead be "+" in order to fix performance bug noted by "kraai" on LWN. (http://lwn.net/Articles/324348/) Changes from v1 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/1/13/440) include: o This version depends on EMBEDDED as well as !SMP, as suggested by Ingo. o Updated rcu_needs_cpu() to unconditionally return zero, permitting the CPU to enter dynticks-idle mode at any time. This works because callbacks can be invoked upon entry to dynticks-idle mode. o Paul is now OK with this being included, based on a poll at the Kernel Miniconf at linux.conf.au, where about ten people said that they cared about saving 900 bytes on single-CPU systems. o Applies to both mainline and tip/core/rcu. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Reviewed-by: Lai Jiangshan <laijs@cn.fujitsu.com> Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org Cc: Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu Cc: avi@redhat.com Cc: mtosatti@redhat.com LKML-Reference: <12565226351355-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: "Tiny RCU", The Bloatwatch Edition This patch is a version of RCU designed for !SMP provided for a small-footprint RCU implementation. In particular, the implementation of synchronize_rcu() is extremely lightweight and high performance. It passes rcutorture testing in each of the four relevant configurations (combinations of NO_HZ and PREEMPT) on x86. This saves about 1K bytes compared to old Classic RCU (which is no longer in mainline), and more than three kilobytes compared to Hierarchical RCU (updated to 2.6.30): CONFIG_TREE_RCU: text data bss dec filename 183 4 0 187 kernel/rcupdate.o 2783 520 36 3339 kernel/rcutree.o 3526 Total (vs 4565 for v7) CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU: text data bss dec filename 263 4 0 267 kernel/rcupdate.o 4594 776 52 5422 kernel/rcutree.o 5689 Total (6155 for v7) CONFIG_TINY_RCU: text data bss dec filename 96 4 0 100 kernel/rcupdate.o 734 24 0 758 kernel/rcutiny.o 858 Total (vs 848 for v7) The above is for x86. Your mileage may vary on other platforms. Further compression is possible, but is being procrastinated. Changes from v7 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/10/9/388) o Apply Lai Jiangshan's review comments (aside from might_sleep() in synchronize_sched(), which is covered by SMP builds). o Fix up expedited primitives. Changes from v6 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/9/23/293). o Forward ported to put it into the 2.6.33 stream. o Added lockdep support. o Make lightweight rcu_barrier. Changes from v5 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/6/23/12). o Ported to latest pre-2.6.32 merge window kernel. - Renamed rcu_qsctr_inc() to rcu_sched_qs(). - Renamed rcu_bh_qsctr_inc() to rcu_bh_qs(). - Provided trivial rcu_cpu_notify(). - Provided trivial exit_rcu(). - Provided trivial rcu_needs_cpu(). - Fixed up the rcu_*_enter/exit() functions in linux/hardirq.h. o Removed the dependence on EMBEDDED, with a view to making TINY_RCU default for !SMP at some time in the future. o Added (trivial) support for expedited grace periods. Changes from v4 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/5/2/91) include: o Squeeze the size down a bit further by removing the ->completed field from struct rcu_ctrlblk. o This permits synchronize_rcu() to become the empty function. Previous concerns about rcutorture were unfounded, as rcutorture correctly handles a constant value from rcu_batches_completed() and rcu_batches_completed_bh(). Changes from v3 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/3/29/221) include: o Changed rcu_batches_completed(), rcu_batches_completed_bh() rcu_enter_nohz(), rcu_exit_nohz(), rcu_nmi_enter(), and rcu_nmi_exit(), to be static inlines, as suggested by David Howells. Doing this saves about 100 bytes from rcutiny.o. (The numbers between v3 and this v4 of the patch are not directly comparable, since they are against different versions of Linux.) Changes from v2 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/2/3/333) include: o Fix whitespace issues. o Change short-circuit "||" operator to instead be "+" in order to fix performance bug noted by "kraai" on LWN. (http://lwn.net/Articles/324348/) Changes from v1 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/1/13/440) include: o This version depends on EMBEDDED as well as !SMP, as suggested by Ingo. o Updated rcu_needs_cpu() to unconditionally return zero, permitting the CPU to enter dynticks-idle mode at any time. This works because callbacks can be invoked upon entry to dynticks-idle mode. o Paul is now OK with this being included, based on a poll at the Kernel Miniconf at linux.conf.au, where about ten people said that they cared about saving 900 bytes on single-CPU systems. o Applies to both mainline and tip/core/rcu. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Reviewed-by: Lai Jiangshan <laijs@cn.fujitsu.com> Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org Cc: Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu Cc: avi@redhat.com Cc: mtosatti@redhat.com LKML-Reference: <12565226351355-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Add a TINY_PREEMPT_RCU Implement a small-memory-footprint uniprocessor-only implementation of preemptible RCU. This implementation uses but a single blocked-tasks list rather than the combinatorial number used per leaf rcu_node by TREE_PREEMPT_RCU, which reduces memory consumption and greatly simplifies processing. This version also takes advantage of uniprocessor execution to accelerate grace periods in the case where there are no readers. The general design is otherwise broadly similar to that of TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. This implementation is a step towards having RCU implementation driven off of the SMP and PREEMPT kernel configuration variables, which can happen once this implementation has accumulated sufficient experience. Removed ACCESS_ONCE() from __rcu_read_unlock() and added barrier() as suggested by Steve Rostedt in order to avoid the compiler-reordering issue noted by Mathieu Desnoyers (http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/8/16/183). As can be seen below, CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU represents almost 5Kbyte savings compared to CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. Of course, for non-real-time workloads, CONFIG_TINY_RCU is even better. CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 6170 825 28 7023 kernel/rcutree.o ---- 7026 Total CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 2081 81 8 2170 kernel/rcutiny.o ---- 2183 Total CONFIG_TINY_RCU (non-preemptible) text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 719 25 0 744 kernel/rcutiny.o --- 757 Total Requested-by: Loïc Minier <loic.minier@canonical.com> Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
11 years ago
rcu: Add a TINY_PREEMPT_RCU Implement a small-memory-footprint uniprocessor-only implementation of preemptible RCU. This implementation uses but a single blocked-tasks list rather than the combinatorial number used per leaf rcu_node by TREE_PREEMPT_RCU, which reduces memory consumption and greatly simplifies processing. This version also takes advantage of uniprocessor execution to accelerate grace periods in the case where there are no readers. The general design is otherwise broadly similar to that of TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. This implementation is a step towards having RCU implementation driven off of the SMP and PREEMPT kernel configuration variables, which can happen once this implementation has accumulated sufficient experience. Removed ACCESS_ONCE() from __rcu_read_unlock() and added barrier() as suggested by Steve Rostedt in order to avoid the compiler-reordering issue noted by Mathieu Desnoyers (http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/8/16/183). As can be seen below, CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU represents almost 5Kbyte savings compared to CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. Of course, for non-real-time workloads, CONFIG_TINY_RCU is even better. CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 6170 825 28 7023 kernel/rcutree.o ---- 7026 Total CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 2081 81 8 2170 kernel/rcutiny.o ---- 2183 Total CONFIG_TINY_RCU (non-preemptible) text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 719 25 0 744 kernel/rcutiny.o --- 757 Total Requested-by: Loïc Minier <loic.minier@canonical.com> Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
11 years ago
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Accelerate grace period if last non-dynticked CPU Currently, rcu_needs_cpu() simply checks whether the current CPU has an outstanding RCU callback, which means that the last CPU to go into dyntick-idle mode might wait a few ticks for the relevant grace periods to complete. However, if all the other CPUs are in dyntick-idle mode, and if this CPU is in a quiescent state (which it is for RCU-bh and RCU-sched any time that we are considering going into dyntick-idle mode), then the grace period is instantly complete. This patch therefore repeatedly invokes the RCU grace-period machinery in order to force any needed grace periods to complete quickly. It does so a limited number of times in order to prevent starvation by an RCU callback function that might pass itself to call_rcu(). However, if any CPU other than the current one is not in dyntick-idle mode, fall back to simply checking (with fix to bug noted by Lai Jiangshan). Also, take advantage of last grace-period forcing, the opportunity to do so noted by Steve Rostedt. And apply simplified #ifdef condition suggested by Frederic Weisbecker. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josh@joshtriplett.org Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org Cc: Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu Cc: dhowells@redhat.com LKML-Reference: <1266887105-1528-15-git-send-email-paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
nohz: Rename CONFIG_NO_HZ to CONFIG_NO_HZ_COMMON We are planning to convert the dynticks Kconfig options layout into a choice menu. The user must be able to easily pick any of the following implementations: constant periodic tick, idle dynticks, full dynticks. As this implies a mutual exclusion, the two dynticks implementions need to converge on the selection of a common Kconfig option in order to ease the sharing of a common infrastructure. It would thus seem pretty natural to reuse CONFIG_NO_HZ to that end. It already implements all the idle dynticks code and the full dynticks depends on all that code for now. So ideally the choice menu would propose CONFIG_NO_HZ_IDLE and CONFIG_NO_HZ_EXTENDED then both would select CONFIG_NO_HZ. On the other hand we want to stay backward compatible: if CONFIG_NO_HZ is set in an older config file, we want to enable CONFIG_NO_HZ_IDLE by default. But we can't afford both at the same time or we run into a circular dependency: 1) CONFIG_NO_HZ_IDLE and CONFIG_NO_HZ_EXTENDED both select CONFIG_NO_HZ 2) If CONFIG_NO_HZ is set, we default to CONFIG_NO_HZ_IDLE We might be able to support that from Kconfig/Kbuild but it may not be wise to introduce such a confusing behaviour. So to solve this, create a new CONFIG_NO_HZ_COMMON option which gathers the common code between idle and full dynticks (that common code for now is simply the idle dynticks code) and select it from their referring Kconfig. Then we'll later create CONFIG_NO_HZ_IDLE and map CONFIG_NO_HZ to it for backward compatibility. Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Chris Metcalf <cmetcalf@tilera.com> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: Geoff Levand <geoff@infradead.org> Cc: Gilad Ben Yossef <gilad@benyossef.com> Cc: Hakan Akkan <hakanakkan@gmail.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Kevin Hilman <khilman@linaro.org> Cc: Li Zhong <zhong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung.kim@lge.com> Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
10 years ago
rcu: Accelerate grace period if last non-dynticked CPU Currently, rcu_needs_cpu() simply checks whether the current CPU has an outstanding RCU callback, which means that the last CPU to go into dyntick-idle mode might wait a few ticks for the relevant grace periods to complete. However, if all the other CPUs are in dyntick-idle mode, and if this CPU is in a quiescent state (which it is for RCU-bh and RCU-sched any time that we are considering going into dyntick-idle mode), then the grace period is instantly complete. This patch therefore repeatedly invokes the RCU grace-period machinery in order to force any needed grace periods to complete quickly. It does so a limited number of times in order to prevent starvation by an RCU callback function that might pass itself to call_rcu(). However, if any CPU other than the current one is not in dyntick-idle mode, fall back to simply checking (with fix to bug noted by Lai Jiangshan). Also, take advantage of last grace-period forcing, the opportunity to do so noted by Steve Rostedt. And apply simplified #ifdef condition suggested by Frederic Weisbecker. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josh@joshtriplett.org Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org Cc: Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu Cc: dhowells@redhat.com LKML-Reference: <1266887105-1528-15-git-send-email-paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Accelerate grace period if last non-dynticked CPU Currently, rcu_needs_cpu() simply checks whether the current CPU has an outstanding RCU callback, which means that the last CPU to go into dyntick-idle mode might wait a few ticks for the relevant grace periods to complete. However, if all the other CPUs are in dyntick-idle mode, and if this CPU is in a quiescent state (which it is for RCU-bh and RCU-sched any time that we are considering going into dyntick-idle mode), then the grace period is instantly complete. This patch therefore repeatedly invokes the RCU grace-period machinery in order to force any needed grace periods to complete quickly. It does so a limited number of times in order to prevent starvation by an RCU callback function that might pass itself to call_rcu(). However, if any CPU other than the current one is not in dyntick-idle mode, fall back to simply checking (with fix to bug noted by Lai Jiangshan). Also, take advantage of last grace-period forcing, the opportunity to do so noted by Steve Rostedt. And apply simplified #ifdef condition suggested by Frederic Weisbecker. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josh@joshtriplett.org Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org Cc: Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu Cc: dhowells@redhat.com LKML-Reference: <1266887105-1528-15-git-send-email-paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
cgroup: implement eventfd-based generic API for notifications This patchset introduces eventfd-based API for notifications in cgroups and implements memory notifications on top of it. It uses statistics in memory controler to track memory usage. Output of time(1) on building kernel on tmpfs: Root cgroup before changes: make -j2 506.37 user 60.93s system 193% cpu 4:52.77 total Non-root cgroup before changes: make -j2 507.14 user 62.66s system 193% cpu 4:54.74 total Root cgroup after changes (0 thresholds): make -j2 507.13 user 62.20s system 193% cpu 4:53.55 total Non-root cgroup after changes (0 thresholds): make -j2 507.70 user 64.20s system 193% cpu 4:55.70 total Root cgroup after changes (1 thresholds, never crossed): make -j2 506.97 user 62.20s system 193% cpu 4:53.90 total Non-root cgroup after changes (1 thresholds, never crossed): make -j2 507.55 user 64.08s system 193% cpu 4:55.63 total This patch: Introduce the write-only file "cgroup.event_control" in every cgroup. To register new notification handler you need: - create an eventfd; - open a control file to be monitored. Callbacks register_event() and unregister_event() must be defined for the control file; - write "<event_fd> <control_fd> <args>" to cgroup.event_control. Interpretation of args is defined by control file implementation; eventfd will be woken up by control file implementation or when the cgroup is removed. To unregister notification handler just close eventfd. If you need notification functionality for a control file you have to implement callbacks register_event() and unregister_event() in the struct cftype. [kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com: Kconfig fix] Signed-off-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name> Reviewed-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Paul Menage <menage@google.com> Cc: Li Zefan <lizf@cn.fujitsu.com> Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@openvz.org> Cc: Dan Malek <dan@embeddedalley.com> Cc: Vladislav Buzov <vbuzov@embeddedalley.com> Cc: Daisuke Nishimura <nishimura@mxp.nes.nec.co.jp> Cc: Alexander Shishkin <virtuoso@slind.org> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
sched: cpu accounting controller (V2) Commit cfb5285660aad4931b2ebbfa902ea48a37dfffa1 removed a useful feature for us, which provided a cpu accounting resource controller. This feature would be useful if someone wants to group tasks only for accounting purpose and doesnt really want to exercise any control over their cpu consumption. The patch below reintroduces the feature. It is based on Paul Menage's original patch (Commit 62d0df64065e7c135d0002f069444fbdfc64768f), with these differences: - Removed load average information. I felt it needs more thought (esp to deal with SMP and virtualized platforms) and can be added for 2.6.25 after more discussions. - Convert group cpu usage to be nanosecond accurate (as rest of the cfs stats are) and invoke cpuacct_charge() from the respective scheduler classes - Make accounting scalable on SMP systems by splitting the usage counter to be per-cpu - Move the code from kernel/cpu_acct.c to kernel/sched.c (since the code is not big enough to warrant a new file and also this rightly needs to live inside the scheduler. Also things like accessing rq->lock while reading cpu usage becomes easier if the code lived in kernel/sched.c) The patch also modifies the cpu controller not to provide the same accounting information. Tested-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Tested the patches on top of 2.6.24-rc3. The patches work fine. Ran some simple tests like cpuspin (spin on the cpu), ran several tasks in the same group and timed them. Compared their time stamps with cpuacct.usage. Signed-off-by: Srivatsa Vaddagiri <vatsa@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
14 years ago
sched: cpu accounting controller (V2) Commit cfb5285660aad4931b2ebbfa902ea48a37dfffa1 removed a useful feature for us, which provided a cpu accounting resource controller. This feature would be useful if someone wants to group tasks only for accounting purpose and doesnt really want to exercise any control over their cpu consumption. The patch below reintroduces the feature. It is based on Paul Menage's original patch (Commit 62d0df64065e7c135d0002f069444fbdfc64768f), with these differences: - Removed load average information. I felt it needs more thought (esp to deal with SMP and virtualized platforms) and can be added for 2.6.25 after more discussions. - Convert group cpu usage to be nanosecond accurate (as rest of the cfs stats are) and invoke cpuacct_charge() from the respective scheduler classes - Make accounting scalable on SMP systems by splitting the usage counter to be per-cpu - Move the code from kernel/cpu_acct.c to kernel/sched.c (since the code is not big enough to warrant a new file and also this rightly needs to live inside the scheduler. Also things like accessing rq->lock while reading cpu usage becomes easier if the code lived in kernel/sched.c) The patch also modifies the cpu controller not to provide the same accounting information. Tested-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Tested the patches on top of 2.6.24-rc3. The patches work fine. Ran some simple tests like cpuspin (spin on the cpu), ran several tasks in the same group and timed them. Compared their time stamps with cpuacct.usage. Signed-off-by: Srivatsa Vaddagiri <vatsa@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
14 years ago
cgroups: add an owner to the mm_struct Remove the mem_cgroup member from mm_struct and instead adds an owner. This approach was suggested by Paul Menage. The advantage of this approach is that, once the mm->owner is known, using the subsystem id, the cgroup can be determined. It also allows several control groups that are virtually grouped by mm_struct, to exist independent of the memory controller i.e., without adding mem_cgroup's for each controller, to mm_struct. A new config option CONFIG_MM_OWNER is added and the memory resource controller selects this config option. This patch also adds cgroup callbacks to notify subsystems when mm->owner changes. The mm_cgroup_changed callback is called with the task_lock() of the new task held and is called just prior to changing the mm->owner. I am indebted to Paul Menage for the several reviews of this patchset and helping me make it lighter and simpler. This patch was tested on a powerpc box, it was compiled with both the MM_OWNER config turned on and off. After the thread group leader exits, it's moved to init_css_state by cgroup_exit(), thus all future charges from runnings threads would be redirected to the init_css_set's subsystem. Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Pavel Emelianov <xemul@openvz.org> Cc: Hugh Dickins <hugh@veritas.com> Cc: Sudhir Kumar <skumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: YAMAMOTO Takashi <yamamoto@valinux.co.jp> Cc: Hirokazu Takahashi <taka@valinux.co.jp> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>, Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Acked-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Acked-by: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi> Reviewed-by: Paul Menage <menage@google.com> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
cgroups: add an owner to the mm_struct Remove the mem_cgroup member from mm_struct and instead adds an owner. This approach was suggested by Paul Menage. The advantage of this approach is that, once the mm->owner is known, using the subsystem id, the cgroup can be determined. It also allows several control groups that are virtually grouped by mm_struct, to exist independent of the memory controller i.e., without adding mem_cgroup's for each controller, to mm_struct. A new config option CONFIG_MM_OWNER is added and the memory resource controller selects this config option. This patch also adds cgroup callbacks to notify subsystems when mm->owner changes. The mm_cgroup_changed callback is called with the task_lock() of the new task held and is called just prior to changing the mm->owner. I am indebted to Paul Menage for the several reviews of this patchset and helping me make it lighter and simpler. This patch was tested on a powerpc box, it was compiled with both the MM_OWNER config turned on and off. After the thread group leader exits, it's moved to init_css_state by cgroup_exit(), thus all future charges from runnings threads would be redirected to the init_css_set's subsystem. Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Pavel Emelianov <xemul@openvz.org> Cc: Hugh Dickins <hugh@veritas.com> Cc: Sudhir Kumar <skumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: YAMAMOTO Takashi <yamamoto@valinux.co.jp> Cc: Hirokazu Takahashi <taka@valinux.co.jp> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>, Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Acked-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Acked-by: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi> Reviewed-by: Paul Menage <menage@google.com> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
memcg: kmem accounting basic infrastructure Add the basic infrastructure for the accounting of kernel memory. To control that, the following files are created: * memory.kmem.usage_in_bytes * memory.kmem.limit_in_bytes * memory.kmem.failcnt * memory.kmem.max_usage_in_bytes They have the same meaning of their user memory counterparts. They reflect the state of the "kmem" res_counter. Per cgroup kmem memory accounting is not enabled until a limit is set for the group. Once the limit is set the accounting cannot be disabled for that group. This means that after the patch is applied, no behavioral changes exists for whoever is still using memcg to control their memory usage, until memory.kmem.limit_in_bytes is set for the first time. We always account to both user and kernel resource_counters. This effectively means that an independent kernel limit is in place when the limit is set to a lower value than the user memory. A equal or higher value means that the user limit will always hit first, meaning that kmem is effectively unlimited. People who want to track kernel memory but not limit it, can set this limit to a very high number (like RESOURCE_MAX - 1page - that no one will ever hit, or equal to the user memory) [akpm@linux-foundation.org: MEMCG_MMEM only works with slab and slub] Signed-off-by: Glauber Costa <glommer@parallels.com> Acked-by: Kamezawa Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.cz> Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org> Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com> Cc: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@redhat.com> Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com> Cc: JoonSoo Kim <js1304@gmail.com> Cc: Mel Gorman <mel@csn.ul.ie> Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi> Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
namespaces: move the IPC namespace under IPC_NS option Currently the IPC namespace management code is spread over the ipc/*.c files. I moved this code into ipc/namespace.c file which is compiled out when needed. The linux/ipc_namespace.h file is used to store the prototypes of the functions in namespace.c and the stubs for NAMESPACES=n case. This is done so, because the stub for copy_ipc_namespace requires the knowledge of the CLONE_NEWIPC flag, which is in sched.h. But the linux/ipc.h file itself in included into many many .c files via the sys.h->sem.h sequence so adding the sched.h into it will make all these .c depend on sched.h which is not that good. On the other hand the knowledge about the namespaces stuff is required in 4 .c files only. Besides, this patch compiles out some auxiliary functions from ipc/sem.c, msg.c and shm.c files. It turned out that moving these functions into namespaces.c is not that easy because they use many other calls and macros from the original file. Moving them would make this patch complicated. On the other hand all these functions can be consolidated, so I will send a separate patch doing this a bit later. Signed-off-by: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@openvz.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Cedric Le Goater <clg@fr.ibm.com> Cc: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com> Cc: Herbert Poetzl <herbert@13thfloor.at> Cc: Kirill Korotaev <dev@sw.ru> Cc: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
namespaces: move the IPC namespace under IPC_NS option Currently the IPC namespace management code is spread over the ipc/*.c files. I moved this code into ipc/namespace.c file which is compiled out when needed. The linux/ipc_namespace.h file is used to store the prototypes of the functions in namespace.c and the stubs for NAMESPACES=n case. This is done so, because the stub for copy_ipc_namespace requires the knowledge of the CLONE_NEWIPC flag, which is in sched.h. But the linux/ipc.h file itself in included into many many .c files via the sys.h->sem.h sequence so adding the sched.h into it will make all these .c depend on sched.h which is not that good. On the other hand the knowledge about the namespaces stuff is required in 4 .c files only. Besides, this patch compiles out some auxiliary functions from ipc/sem.c, msg.c and shm.c files. It turned out that moving these functions into namespaces.c is not that easy because they use many other calls and macros from the original file. Moving them would make this patch complicated. On the other hand all these functions can be consolidated, so I will send a separate patch doing this a bit later. Signed-off-by: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@openvz.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Cedric Le Goater <clg@fr.ibm.com> Cc: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com> Cc: Herbert Poetzl <herbert@13thfloor.at> Cc: Kirill Korotaev <dev@sw.ru> Cc: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
namespaces: move the IPC namespace under IPC_NS option Currently the IPC namespace management code is spread over the ipc/*.c files. I moved this code into ipc/namespace.c file which is compiled out when needed. The linux/ipc_namespace.h file is used to store the prototypes of the functions in namespace.c and the stubs for NAMESPACES=n case. This is done so, because the stub for copy_ipc_namespace requires the knowledge of the CLONE_NEWIPC flag, which is in sched.h. But the linux/ipc.h file itself in included into many many .c files via the sys.h->sem.h sequence so adding the sched.h into it will make all these .c depend on sched.h which is not that good. On the other hand the knowledge about the namespaces stuff is required in 4 .c files only. Besides, this patch compiles out some auxiliary functions from ipc/sem.c, msg.c and shm.c files. It turned out that moving these functions into namespaces.c is not that easy because they use many other calls and macros from the original file. Moving them would make this patch complicated. On the other hand all these functions can be consolidated, so I will send a separate patch doing this a bit later. Signed-off-by: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@openvz.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Cc: Cedric Le Goater <clg@fr.ibm.com> Cc: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com> Cc: Herbert Poetzl <herbert@13thfloor.at> Cc: Kirill Korotaev <dev@sw.ru> Cc: Sukadev Bhattiprolu <sukadev@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
sched: Add 'autogroup' scheduling feature: automated per session task groups A recurring complaint from CFS users is that parallel kbuild has a negative impact on desktop interactivity. This patch implements an idea from Linus, to automatically create task groups. Currently, only per session autogroups are implemented, but the patch leaves the way open for enhancement. Implementation: each task's signal struct contains an inherited pointer to a refcounted autogroup struct containing a task group pointer, the default for all tasks pointing to the init_task_group. When a task calls setsid(), a new task group is created, the process is moved into the new task group, and a reference to the preveious task group is dropped. Child processes inherit this task group thereafter, and increase it's refcount. When the last thread of a process exits, the process's reference is dropped, such that when the last process referencing an autogroup exits, the autogroup is destroyed. At runqueue selection time, IFF a task has no cgroup assignment, its current autogroup is used. Autogroup bandwidth is controllable via setting it's nice level through the proc filesystem: cat /proc/<pid>/autogroup Displays the task's group and the group's nice level. echo <nice level> > /proc/<pid>/autogroup Sets the task group's shares to the weight of nice <level> task. Setting nice level is rate limited for !admin users due to the abuse risk of task group locking. The feature is enabled from boot by default if CONFIG_SCHED_AUTOGROUP=y is selected, but can be disabled via the boot option noautogroup, and can also be turned on/off on the fly via: echo [01] > /proc/sys/kernel/sched_autogroup_enabled ... which will automatically move tasks to/from the root task group. Signed-off-by: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de> Acked-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@chello.nl> Cc: Markus Trippelsdorf <markus@trippelsdorf.de> Cc: Mathieu Desnoyers <mathieu.desnoyers@efficios.com> Cc: Paul Turner <pjt@google.com> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com> [ Removed the task_group_path() debug code, and fixed !EVENTFD build failure. ] Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> LKML-Reference: <1290281700.28711.9.camel@maggy.simson.net> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
11 years ago
[PATCH] sysctl: Undeprecate sys_sysctl The basic issue is that despite have been deprecated and warned about as a very bad thing in the man pages since its inception there are a few real users of sys_sysctl. It was my assumption that because sysctl had been deprecated for all of 2.6 there would be no user space users by this point, so I initially gave sys_sysctl a very short deprecation period. Now that I know there are a few real users the only sane way to proceed with deprecation is to push the time limit out to a year or two work and work with distributions that have big testing pools like fedora core to find these last remaining users. Which means that the sys_sysctl interface needs to be maintained in the meantime. Since I have provided a technical measure that allows us to add new sysctl entries without reserving more binary numbers I believe that is enough to fix the sys_sysctl binary interface maintenance problems, because there is no longer a need to change the binary interface at all. Since the sys_sysctl implementation needs to stay around for a while and the worst of the maintenance issues that caused us to occasionally break the ABI have been addressed I don't see any advantage in continuing with the removal of sys_sysctl. So instead of merely increasing the deprecation period this patch removes the deprecation of sys_sysctl and modifies the kernel to compile the code in by default. With committing to maintain sys_sysctl we get all of the advantages of a fast interface for anything that needs it. Currently sys_sysctl is about 5x faster than /proc/sys, for the same string data. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Acked-by: Alan Cox <alan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] sysctl: Undeprecate sys_sysctl The basic issue is that despite have been deprecated and warned about as a very bad thing in the man pages since its inception there are a few real users of sys_sysctl. It was my assumption that because sysctl had been deprecated for all of 2.6 there would be no user space users by this point, so I initially gave sys_sysctl a very short deprecation period. Now that I know there are a few real users the only sane way to proceed with deprecation is to push the time limit out to a year or two work and work with distributions that have big testing pools like fedora core to find these last remaining users. Which means that the sys_sysctl interface needs to be maintained in the meantime. Since I have provided a technical measure that allows us to add new sysctl entries without reserving more binary numbers I believe that is enough to fix the sys_sysctl binary interface maintenance problems, because there is no longer a need to change the binary interface at all. Since the sys_sysctl implementation needs to stay around for a while and the worst of the maintenance issues that caused us to occasionally break the ABI have been addressed I don't see any advantage in continuing with the removal of sys_sysctl. So instead of merely increasing the deprecation period this patch removes the deprecation of sys_sysctl and modifies the kernel to compile the code in by default. With committing to maintain sys_sysctl we get all of the advantages of a fast interface for anything that needs it. Currently sys_sysctl is about 5x faster than /proc/sys, for the same string data. Signed-off-by: Eric W. Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com> Acked-by: Alan Cox <alan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
signal/timer/event: signalfd core This patch series implements the new signalfd() system call. I took part of the original Linus code (and you know how badly it can be broken :), and I added even more breakage ;) Signals are fetched from the same signal queue used by the process, so signalfd will compete with standard kernel delivery in dequeue_signal(). If you want to reliably fetch signals on the signalfd file, you need to block them with sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK). This seems to be working fine on my Dual Opteron machine. I made a quick test program for it: http://www.xmailserver.org/signafd-test.c The signalfd() system call implements signal delivery into a file descriptor receiver. The signalfd file descriptor if created with the following API: int signalfd(int ufd, const sigset_t *mask, size_t masksize); The "ufd" parameter allows to change an existing signalfd sigmask, w/out going to close/create cycle (Linus idea). Use "ufd" == -1 if you want a brand new signalfd file. The "mask" allows to specify the signal mask of signals that we are interested in. The "masksize" parameter is the size of "mask". The signalfd fd supports the poll(2) and read(2) system calls. The poll(2) will return POLLIN when signals are available to be dequeued. As a direct consequence of supporting the Linux poll subsystem, the signalfd fd can use used together with epoll(2) too. The read(2) system call will return a "struct signalfd_siginfo" structure in the userspace supplied buffer. The return value is the number of bytes copied in the supplied buffer, or -1 in case of error. The read(2) call can also return 0, in case the sighand structure to which the signalfd was attached, has been orphaned. The O_NONBLOCK flag is also supported, and read(2) will return -EAGAIN in case no signal is available. If the size of the buffer passed to read(2) is lower than sizeof(struct signalfd_siginfo), -EINVAL is returned. A read from the signalfd can also return -ERESTARTSYS in case a signal hits the process. The format of the struct signalfd_siginfo is, and the valid fields depends of the (->code & __SI_MASK) value, in the same way a struct siginfo would: struct signalfd_siginfo { __u32 signo; /* si_signo */ __s32 err; /* si_errno */ __s32 code; /* si_code */ __u32 pid; /* si_pid */ __u32 uid; /* si_uid */ __s32 fd; /* si_fd */ __u32 tid; /* si_fd */ __u32 band; /* si_band */ __u32 overrun; /* si_overrun */ __u32 trapno; /* si_trapno */ __s32 status; /* si_status */ __s32 svint; /* si_int */ __u64 svptr; /* si_ptr */ __u64 utime; /* si_utime */ __u64 stime; /* si_stime */ __u64 addr; /* si_addr */ }; [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix signalfd_copyinfo() on i386] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
signal/timer/event: signalfd core This patch series implements the new signalfd() system call. I took part of the original Linus code (and you know how badly it can be broken :), and I added even more breakage ;) Signals are fetched from the same signal queue used by the process, so signalfd will compete with standard kernel delivery in dequeue_signal(). If you want to reliably fetch signals on the signalfd file, you need to block them with sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK). This seems to be working fine on my Dual Opteron machine. I made a quick test program for it: http://www.xmailserver.org/signafd-test.c The signalfd() system call implements signal delivery into a file descriptor receiver. The signalfd file descriptor if created with the following API: int signalfd(int ufd, const sigset_t *mask, size_t masksize); The "ufd" parameter allows to change an existing signalfd sigmask, w/out going to close/create cycle (Linus idea). Use "ufd" == -1 if you want a brand new signalfd file. The "mask" allows to specify the signal mask of signals that we are interested in. The "masksize" parameter is the size of "mask". The signalfd fd supports the poll(2) and read(2) system calls. The poll(2) will return POLLIN when signals are available to be dequeued. As a direct consequence of supporting the Linux poll subsystem, the signalfd fd can use used together with epoll(2) too. The read(2) system call will return a "struct signalfd_siginfo" structure in the userspace supplied buffer. The return value is the number of bytes copied in the supplied buffer, or -1 in case of error. The read(2) call can also return 0, in case the sighand structure to which the signalfd was attached, has been orphaned. The O_NONBLOCK flag is also supported, and read(2) will return -EAGAIN in case no signal is available. If the size of the buffer passed to read(2) is lower than sizeof(struct signalfd_siginfo), -EINVAL is returned. A read from the signalfd can also return -ERESTARTSYS in case a signal hits the process. The format of the struct signalfd_siginfo is, and the valid fields depends of the (->code & __SI_MASK) value, in the same way a struct siginfo would: struct signalfd_siginfo { __u32 signo; /* si_signo */ __s32 err; /* si_errno */ __s32 code; /* si_code */ __u32 pid; /* si_pid */ __u32 uid; /* si_uid */ __s32 fd; /* si_fd */ __u32 tid; /* si_fd */ __u32 band; /* si_band */ __u32 overrun; /* si_overrun */ __u32 trapno; /* si_trapno */ __s32 status; /* si_status */ __s32 svint; /* si_int */ __u64 svptr; /* si_ptr */ __u64 utime; /* si_utime */ __u64 stime; /* si_stime */ __u64 addr; /* si_addr */ }; [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix signalfd_copyinfo() on i386] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
signal/timer/event: eventfd core This is a very simple and light file descriptor, that can be used as event wait/dispatch by userspace (both wait and dispatch) and by the kernel (dispatch only). It can be used instead of pipe(2) in all cases where those would simply be used to signal events. Their kernel overhead is much lower than pipes, and they do not consume two fds. When used in the kernel, it can offer an fd-bridge to enable, for example, functionalities like KAIO or syslets/threadlets to signal to an fd the completion of certain operations. But more in general, an eventfd can be used by the kernel to signal readiness, in a POSIX poll/select way, of interfaces that would otherwise be incompatible with it. The API is: int eventfd(unsigned int count); The eventfd API accepts an initial "count" parameter, and returns an eventfd fd. It supports poll(2) (POLLIN, POLLOUT, POLLERR), read(2) and write(2). The POLLIN flag is raised when the internal counter is greater than zero. The POLLOUT flag is raised when at least a value of "1" can be written to the internal counter. The POLLERR flag is raised when an overflow in the counter value is detected. The write(2) operation can never overflow the counter, since it blocks (unless O_NONBLOCK is set, in which case -EAGAIN is returned). But the eventfd_signal() function can do it, since it's supposed to not sleep during its operation. The read(2) function reads the __u64 counter value, and reset the internal value to zero. If the value read is equal to (__u64) -1, an overflow happened on the internal counter (due to 2^64 eventfd_signal() posts that has never been retired - unlickely, but possible). The write(2) call writes an __u64 count value, and adds it to the current counter. The eventfd fd supports O_NONBLOCK also. On the kernel side, we have: struct file *eventfd_fget(int fd); int eventfd_signal(struct file *file, unsigned int n); The eventfd_fget() should be called to get a struct file* from an eventfd fd (this is an fget() + check of f_op being an eventfd fops pointer). The kernel can then call eventfd_signal() every time it wants to post an event to userspace. The eventfd_signal() function can be called from any context. An eventfd() simple test and bench is available here: http://www.xmailserver.org/eventfd-bench.c This is the eventfd-based version of pipetest-4 (pipe(2) based): http://www.xmailserver.org/pipetest-4.c Not that performance matters much in the eventfd case, but eventfd-bench shows almost as double as performance than pipetest-4. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix i386 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_eventfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
signal/timer/event: eventfd core This is a very simple and light file descriptor, that can be used as event wait/dispatch by userspace (both wait and dispatch) and by the kernel (dispatch only). It can be used instead of pipe(2) in all cases where those would simply be used to signal events. Their kernel overhead is much lower than pipes, and they do not consume two fds. When used in the kernel, it can offer an fd-bridge to enable, for example, functionalities like KAIO or syslets/threadlets to signal to an fd the completion of certain operations. But more in general, an eventfd can be used by the kernel to signal readiness, in a POSIX poll/select way, of interfaces that would otherwise be incompatible with it. The API is: int eventfd(unsigned int count); The eventfd API accepts an initial "count" parameter, and returns an eventfd fd. It supports poll(2) (POLLIN, POLLOUT, POLLERR), read(2) and write(2). The POLLIN flag is raised when the internal counter is greater than zero. The POLLOUT flag is raised when at least a value of "1" can be written to the internal counter. The POLLERR flag is raised when an overflow in the counter value is detected. The write(2) operation can never overflow the counter, since it blocks (unless O_NONBLOCK is set, in which case -EAGAIN is returned). But the eventfd_signal() function can do it, since it's supposed to not sleep during its operation. The read(2) function reads the __u64 counter value, and reset the internal value to zero. If the value read is equal to (__u64) -1, an overflow happened on the internal counter (due to 2^64 eventfd_signal() posts that has never been retired - unlickely, but possible). The write(2) call writes an __u64 count value, and adds it to the current counter. The eventfd fd supports O_NONBLOCK also. On the kernel side, we have: struct file *eventfd_fget(int fd); int eventfd_signal(struct file *file, unsigned int n); The eventfd_fget() should be called to get a struct file* from an eventfd fd (this is an fget() + check of f_op being an eventfd fops pointer). The kernel can then call eventfd_signal() every time it wants to post an event to userspace. The eventfd_signal() function can be called from any context. An eventfd() simple test and bench is available here: http://www.xmailserver.org/eventfd-bench.c This is the eventfd-based version of pipetest-4 (pipe(2) based): http://www.xmailserver.org/pipetest-4.c Not that performance matters much in the eventfd case, but eventfd-bench shows almost as double as performance than pipetest-4. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix i386 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_eventfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
perf: Do the big rename: Performance Counters -> Performance Events Bye-bye Performance Counters, welcome Performance Events! In the past few months the perfcounters subsystem has grown out its initial role of counting hardware events, and has become (and is becoming) a much broader generic event enumeration, reporting, logging, monitoring, analysis facility. Naming its core object 'perf_counter' and naming the subsystem 'perfcounters' has become more and more of a misnomer. With pending code like hw-breakpoints support the 'counter' name is less and less appropriate. All in one, we've decided to rename the subsystem to 'performance events' and to propagate this rename through all fields, variables and API names. (in an ABI compatible fashion) The word 'event' is also a bit shorter than 'counter' - which makes it slightly more convenient to write/handle as well. Thanks goes to Stephane Eranian who first observed this misnomer and suggested a rename. User-space tooling and ABI compatibility is not affected - this patch should be function-invariant. (Also, defconfigs were not touched to keep the size down.) This patch has been generated via the following script: FILES=$(find * -type f | grep -vE 'oprofile|[^K]config') sed -i \ -e 's/PERF_EVENT_/PERF_RECORD_/g' \ -e 's/PERF_COUNTER/PERF_EVENT/g' \ -e 's/perf_counter/perf_event/g' \ -e 's/nb_counters/nb_events/g' \ -e 's/swcounter/swevent/g' \ -e 's/tpcounter_event/tp_event/g' \ $FILES for N in $(find . -name perf_counter.[ch]); do M=$(echo $N | sed 's/perf_counter/perf_event/g') mv $N $M done FILES=$(find . -name perf_event.*) sed -i \ -e 's/COUNTER_MASK/REG_MASK/g' \ -e 's/COUNTER/EVENT/g' \ -e 's/\<event\>/event_id/g' \ -e 's/counter/event/g' \ -e 's/Counter/Event/g' \ $FILES ... to keep it as correct as possible. This script can also be used by anyone who has pending perfcounters patches - it converts a Linux kernel tree over to the new naming. We tried to time this change to the point in time where the amount of pending patches is the smallest: the end of the merge window. Namespace clashes were fixed up in a preparatory patch - and some stylistic fallout will be fixed up in a subsequent patch. ( NOTE: 'counters' are still the proper terminology when we deal with hardware registers - and these sed scripts are a bit over-eager in renaming them. I've undone some of that, but in case there's something left where 'counter' would be better than 'event' we can undo that on an individual basis instead of touching an otherwise nicely automated patch. ) Suggested-by: Stephane Eranian <eranian@google.com> Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@chello.nl> Acked-by: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Reviewed-by: Arjan van de Ven <arjan@linux.intel.com> Cc: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de> Cc: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com> Cc: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Kyle McMartin <kyle@mcmartin.ca> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> LKML-Reference: <new-submission> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
perf: Do the big rename: Performance Counters -> Performance Events Bye-bye Performance Counters, welcome Performance Events! In the past few months the perfcounters subsystem has grown out its initial role of counting hardware events, and has become (and is becoming) a much broader generic event enumeration, reporting, logging, monitoring, analysis facility. Naming its core object 'perf_counter' and naming the subsystem 'perfcounters' has become more and more of a misnomer. With pending code like hw-breakpoints support the 'counter' name is less and less appropriate. All in one, we've decided to rename the subsystem to 'performance events' and to propagate this rename through all fields, variables and API names. (in an ABI compatible fashion) The word 'event' is also a bit shorter than 'counter' - which makes it slightly more convenient to write/handle as well. Thanks goes to Stephane Eranian who first observed this misnomer and suggested a rename. User-space tooling and ABI compatibility is not affected - this patch should be function-invariant. (Also, defconfigs were not touched to keep the size down.) This patch has been generated via the following script: FILES=$(find * -type f | grep -vE 'oprofile|[^K]config') sed -i \ -e 's/PERF_EVENT_/PERF_RECORD_/g' \ -e 's/PERF_COUNTER/PERF_EVENT/g' \ -e 's/perf_counter/perf_event/g' \ -e 's/nb_counters/nb_events/g' \ -e 's/swcounter/swevent/g' \ -e 's/tpcounter_event/tp_event/g' \ $FILES for N in $(find . -name perf_counter.[ch]); do M=$(echo $N | sed 's/perf_counter/perf_event/g') mv $N $M done FILES=$(find . -name perf_event.*) sed -i \ -e 's/COUNTER_MASK/REG_MASK/g' \ -e 's/COUNTER/EVENT/g' \ -e 's/\<event\>/event_id/g' \ -e 's/counter/event/g' \ -e 's/Counter/Event/g' \ $FILES ... to keep it as correct as possible. This script can also be used by anyone who has pending perfcounters patches - it converts a Linux kernel tree over to the new naming. We tried to time this change to the point in time where the amount of pending patches is the smallest: the end of the merge window. Namespace clashes were fixed up in a preparatory patch - and some stylistic fallout will be fixed up in a subsequent patch. ( NOTE: 'counters' are still the proper terminology when we deal with hardware registers - and these sed scripts are a bit over-eager in renamin