original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
You can not select more than 25 topics Topics must start with a letter or number, can include dashes ('-') and can be up to 35 characters long.

2412 lines
77 KiB

x86: simplify "make ARCH=x86" and fix kconfig all.config Simplify "make ARCH=x86" and fix kconfig so we again can set 64BIT in all.config. For a fix the diffstat is nice: 6 files changed, 3 insertions(+), 36 deletions(-) The patch reverts these commits: - 0f855aa64b3f63d35a891510cf7db932a435c116 ("kconfig: add helper to set config symbol from environment variable") - 2a113281f5cd2febbab21a93c8943f8d3eece4d3 ("kconfig: use $K64BIT to set 64BIT with all*config targets") Roman Zippel pointed out that kconfig supported string compares so the additional complexity introduced by the above two patches were not needed. With this patch we have following behaviour: # make {allno,allyes,allmod,rand}config [ARCH=...] option \ host arch | 32bit | 64bit ===================================================== ./. | 32bit | 64bit ARCH=x86 | 32bit | 32bit ARCH=i386 | 32bit | 32bit ARCH=x86_64 | 64bit | 64bit The general rule are that ARCH= and native architecture takes precedence over the configuration. So make ARCH=i386 [whatever] will always build a 32-bit kernel no matter what the configuration says. The configuration will be updated to 32-bit if it was configured to 64-bit and the other way around. This behaviour is consistent with previous behaviour so no suprises here. make ARCH=x86 will per default result in a 32-bit kernel but as the only ARCH= value x86 allow the user to select between 32-bit and 64-bit using menuconfig. Signed-off-by: Sam Ravnborg <sam@ravnborg.org> Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: Andreas Herrmann <aherrman@arcor.de> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
x86: Default to ARCH=x86 to avoid overriding CONFIG_64BIT It is easy to waste a bunch of time when one takes a 32-bit .config from a test machine and try to build it on a faster 64-bit system, and its existing setting of CONFIG_64BIT=n gets *changed* to match the build host. Similarly, if one has an existing build tree it is easy to trash an entire build tree that way. This is because the default setting for $ARCH when discovered from 'uname' is one of the legacy pre-x86-merge values (i386 or x86_64), which effectively force the setting of CONFIG_64BIT to match. We should default to ARCH=x86 instead, finally completing the merge that we started so long ago. This patch preserves the behaviour of the legacy ARCH settings for commands such as: make ARCH=x86_64 randconfig make ARCH=i386 randconfig ... since making the value of CONFIG_64BIT actually random in that situation is not desirable. In time, perhaps we can retire this legacy use of the old ARCH= values. We already have a way to override values for *any* config option, using $KCONFIG_ALLCONFIG, so it could be argued that we don't necessarily need to keep ARCH={i386,x86_64} around as a special case just for overriding CONFIG_64BIT. We'd probably at least want to add a way to override config options from the command line ('make CONFIG_FOO=y oldconfig') before we talk about doing that though. Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <David.Woodhouse@intel.com> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1356040315.3198.51.camel@shinybook.infradead.org Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@linux.intel.com>
9 years ago
lockref: implement lockless reference count updates using cmpxchg() Instead of taking the spinlock, the lockless versions atomically check that the lock is not taken, and do the reference count update using a cmpxchg() loop. This is semantically identical to doing the reference count update protected by the lock, but avoids the "wait for lock" contention that you get when accesses to the reference count are contended. Note that a "lockref" is absolutely _not_ equivalent to an atomic_t. Even when the lockref reference counts are updated atomically with cmpxchg, the fact that they also verify the state of the spinlock means that the lockless updates can never happen while somebody else holds the spinlock. So while "lockref_put_or_lock()" looks a lot like just another name for "atomic_dec_and_lock()", and both optimize to lockless updates, they are fundamentally different: the decrement done by atomic_dec_and_lock() is truly independent of any lock (as long as it doesn't decrement to zero), so a locked region can still see the count change. The lockref structure, in contrast, really is a *locked* reference count. If you hold the spinlock, the reference count will be stable and you can modify the reference count without using atomics, because even the lockless updates will see and respect the state of the lock. In order to enable the cmpxchg lockless code, the architecture needs to do three things: (1) Make sure that the "arch_spinlock_t" and an "unsigned int" can fit in an aligned u64, and have a "cmpxchg()" implementation that works on such a u64 data type. (2) define a helper function to test for a spinlock being unlocked ("arch_spin_value_unlocked()") (3) select the "ARCH_USE_CMPXCHG_LOCKREF" config variable in its Kconfig file. This enables it for x86-64 (but not 32-bit, we'd need to make sure cmpxchg() turns into the proper cmpxchg8b in order to enable it for 32-bit mode). Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
8 years ago
Kconfig: consolidate CONFIG_DEBUG_STRICT_USER_COPY_CHECKS The help text for this config is duplicated across the x86, parisc, and s390 Kconfig.debug files. Arnd Bergman noted that the help text was slightly misleading and should be fixed to state that enabling this option isn't a problem when using pre 4.4 gcc. To simplify the rewording, consolidate the text into lib/Kconfig.debug and modify it there to be more explicit about when you should say N to this config. Also, make the text a bit more generic by stating that this option enables compile time checks so we can cover architectures which emit warnings vs. ones which emit errors. The details of how an architecture decided to implement the checks isn't as important as the concept of compile time checking of copy_from_user() calls. While we're doing this, remove all the copy_from_user_overflow() code that's duplicated many times and place it into lib/ so that any architecture supporting this option can get the function for free. Signed-off-by: Stephen Boyd <sboyd@codeaurora.org> Acked-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Acked-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Arjan van de Ven <arjan@linux.intel.com> Acked-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au> Cc: Chris Metcalf <cmetcalf@tilera.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
x86: Use memblock to replace early_res 1. replace find_e820_area with memblock_find_in_range 2. replace reserve_early with memblock_x86_reserve_range 3. replace free_early with memblock_x86_free_range. 4. NO_BOOTMEM will switch to use memblock too. 5. use _e820, _early wrap in the patch, in following patch, will replace them all 6. because memblock_x86_free_range support partial free, we can remove some special care 7. Need to make sure that memblock_find_in_range() is called after memblock_x86_fill() so adjust some calling later in setup.c::setup_arch() -- corruption_check and mptable_update -v2: Move reserve_brk() early Before fill_memblock_area, to avoid overlap between brk and memblock_find_in_range() that could happen We have more then 128 RAM entry in E820 tables, and memblock_x86_fill() could use memblock_find_in_range() to find a new place for memblock.memory.region array. and We don't need to use extend_brk() after fill_memblock_area() So move reserve_brk() early before fill_memblock_area(). -v3: Move find_smp_config early To make sure memblock_find_in_range not find wrong place, if BIOS doesn't put mptable in right place. -v4: Treat RESERVED_KERN as RAM in memblock.memory. and they are already in memblock.reserved already.. use __NOT_KEEP_MEMBLOCK to make sure memblock related code could be freed later. -v5: Generic version __memblock_find_in_range() is going from high to low, and for 32bit active_region for 32bit does include high pages need to replace the limit with memblock.default_alloc_limit, aka get_max_mapped() -v6: Use current_limit instead -v7: check with MEMBLOCK_ERROR instead of -1ULL or -1L -v8: Set memblock_can_resize early to handle EFI with more RAM entries -v9: update after kmemleak changes in mainline Suggested-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net> Suggested-by: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Suggested-by: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Signed-off-by: Yinghai Lu <yinghai@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
11 years ago
kprobes/x86: Support kprobes jump optimization on x86 Introduce x86 arch-specific optimization code, which supports both of x86-32 and x86-64. This code also supports safety checking, which decodes whole of a function in which probe is inserted, and checks following conditions before optimization: - The optimized instructions which will be replaced by a jump instruction don't straddle the function boundary. - There is no indirect jump instruction, because it will jumps into the address range which is replaced by jump operand. - There is no jump/loop instruction which jumps into the address range which is replaced by jump operand. - Don't optimize kprobes if it is in functions into which fixup code will jumps. This uses text_poke_multibyte() which doesn't support modifying code on NMI/MCE handler. However, since kprobes itself doesn't support NMI/MCE code probing, it's not a problem. Changes in v9: - Use *_text_reserved() for checking the probe can be optimized. - Verify jump address range is in 2G range when preparing slot. - Backup original code when switching optimized buffer, instead of preparing buffer, because there can be int3 of other probes in preparing phase. - Check kprobe is disabled in arch_check_optimized_kprobe(). - Strictly check indirect jump opcodes (ff /4, ff /5). Changes in v6: - Split stop_machine-based jump patching code. - Update comments and coding style. Changes in v5: - Introduce stop_machine-based jump replacing. Signed-off-by: Masami Hiramatsu <mhiramat@redhat.com> Cc: systemtap <systemtap@sources.redhat.com> Cc: DLE <dle-develop@lists.sourceforge.net> Cc: Ananth N Mavinakayanahalli <ananth@in.ibm.com> Cc: Jim Keniston <jkenisto@us.ibm.com> Cc: Srikar Dronamraju <srikar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Anders Kaseorg <andersk@ksplice.com> Cc: Tim Abbott <tabbott@ksplice.com> Cc: Andi Kleen <andi@firstfloor.org> Cc: Jason Baron <jbaron@redhat.com> Cc: Mathieu Desnoyers <compudj@krystal.dyndns.org> Cc: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Ananth N Mavinakayanahalli <ananth@in.ibm.com> LKML-Reference: <20100225133446.6725.78994.stgit@localhost6.localdomain6> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
tracing/function-graph-tracer: support for x86-64 Impact: extend and enable the function graph tracer to 64-bit x86 This patch implements the support for function graph tracer under x86-64. Both static and dynamic tracing are supported. This causes some small CPP conditional asm on arch/x86/kernel/ftrace.c I wanted to use probe_kernel_read/write to make the return address saving/patching code more generic but it causes tracing recursion. That would be perhaps useful to implement a notrace version of these function for other archs ports. Note that arch/x86/process_64.c is not traced, as in X86-32. I first thought __switch_to() was responsible of crashes during tracing because I believed current task were changed inside but that's actually not the case (actually yes, but not the "current" pointer). So I will have to investigate to find the functions that harm here, to enable tracing of the other functions inside (but there is no issue at this time, while process_64.c stays out of -pg flags). A little possible race condition is fixed inside this patch too. When the tracer allocate a return stack dynamically, the current depth is not initialized before but after. An interrupt could occur at this time and, after seeing that the return stack is allocated, the tracer could try to trace it with a random uninitialized depth. It's a prevention, even if I hadn't problems with it. Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Tim Bird <tim.bird@am.sony.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
function-graph: add stack frame test In case gcc does something funny with the stack frames, or the return from function code, we would like to detect that. An arch may implement passing of a variable that is unique to the function and can be saved on entering a function and can be tested when exiting the function. Usually the frame pointer can be used for this purpose. This patch also implements this for x86. Where it passes in the stack frame of the parent function, and will test that frame on exit. There was a case in x86_32 with optimize for size (-Os) where, for a few functions, gcc would align the stack frame and place a copy of the return address into it. The function graph tracer modified the copy and not the actual return address. On return from the funtion, it did not go to the tracer hook, but returned to the parent. This broke the function graph tracer, because the return of the parent (where gcc did not do this funky manipulation) returned to the location that the child function was suppose to. This caused strange kernel crashes. This test detected the problem and pointed out where the issue was. This modifies the parameters of one of the functions that the arch specific code calls, so it includes changes to arch code to accommodate the new prototype. Note, I notice that the parsic arch implements its own push_return_trace. This is now a generic function and the ftrace_push_return_trace should be used instead. This patch does not touch that code. Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de> Cc: Kyle McMartin <kyle@mcmartin.ca> Signed-off-by: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
12 years ago
hw-breakpoints: Fix hardware breakpoints -> perf events dependency The kbuild's select command doesn't propagate through the config dependencies. Hence the current rules of hardware breakpoint's config can't ensure perf can never be disabled under us. We have: config X86 selects HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS config HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS select PERF_EVENTS config PERF_EVENTS [...] x86 will select the breakpoints but that won't propagate to perf events. The user can still disable the latter, but it is necessary for the breakpoints. What we need is: - x86 selects HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS and PERF_EVENTS - HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS depends on PERF_EVENTS so that we ensure PERF_EVENTS is enabled and frozen for x86. This fixes the following kind of build errors: In file included from arch/x86/kernel/hw_breakpoint.c:31: include/linux/hw_breakpoint.h: In function 'hw_breakpoint_addr': include/linux/hw_breakpoint.h:39: error: 'struct perf_event' has no member named 'attr' v2: Select also ANON_INODES from x86, required for perf Reported-by: Cyrill Gorcunov <gorcunov@gmail.com> Reported-by: Michal Marek <mmarek@suse.cz> Reported-by: Andrew Randrianasulu <randrik_a@yahoo.com> Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Randy Dunlap <randy.dunlap@oracle.com> Cc: K.Prasad <prasad@linux.vnet.ibm.com> LKML-Reference: <1261010034-7786-1-git-send-regression-fweisbec@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
perf: Unified API to record selective sets of arch registers This brings a new API to help the selective dump of registers on event sampling, and its implementation for x86 arch. Added HAVE_PERF_REGS config option to determine if the architecture provides perf registers ABI. The information about desired registers will be passed in u64 mask. It's up to the architecture to map the registers into the mask bits. For the x86 arch implementation, both 32 and 64 bit registers bits are defined within single enum to ensure 64 bit system can provide register dump for compat task if needed in the future. Original-patch-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> [ Added missing linux/errno.h include ] Signed-off-by: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@redhat.com> Cc: "Frank Ch. Eigler" <fche@redhat.com> Cc: Arun Sharma <asharma@fb.com> Cc: Benjamin Redelings <benjamin.redelings@nescent.org> Cc: Corey Ashford <cjashfor@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Cyrill Gorcunov <gorcunov@openvz.org> Cc: Frank Ch. Eigler <fche@redhat.com> Cc: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org> Cc: Masami Hiramatsu <masami.hiramatsu.pt@hitachi.com> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@chello.nl> Cc: Robert Richter <robert.richter@amd.com> Cc: Stephane Eranian <eranian@google.com> Cc: Tom Zanussi <tzanussi@gmail.com> Cc: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@gmail.com> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1344345647-11536-2-git-send-email-jolsa@redhat.com Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
9 years ago
9 years ago
hw-breakpoints: Fix hardware breakpoints -> perf events dependency The kbuild's select command doesn't propagate through the config dependencies. Hence the current rules of hardware breakpoint's config can't ensure perf can never be disabled under us. We have: config X86 selects HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS config HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS select PERF_EVENTS config PERF_EVENTS [...] x86 will select the breakpoints but that won't propagate to perf events. The user can still disable the latter, but it is necessary for the breakpoints. What we need is: - x86 selects HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS and PERF_EVENTS - HAVE_HW_BREAKPOINTS depends on PERF_EVENTS so that we ensure PERF_EVENTS is enabled and frozen for x86. This fixes the following kind of build errors: In file included from arch/x86/kernel/hw_breakpoint.c:31: include/linux/hw_breakpoint.h: In function 'hw_breakpoint_addr': include/linux/hw_breakpoint.h:39: error: 'struct perf_event' has no member named 'attr' v2: Select also ANON_INODES from x86, required for perf Reported-by: Cyrill Gorcunov <gorcunov@gmail.com> Reported-by: Michal Marek <mmarek@suse.cz> Reported-by: Andrew Randrianasulu <randrik_a@yahoo.com> Signed-off-by: Frederic Weisbecker <fweisbec@gmail.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Randy Dunlap <randy.dunlap@oracle.com> Cc: K.Prasad <prasad@linux.vnet.ibm.com> LKML-Reference: <1261010034-7786-1-git-send-regression-fweisbec@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
Add Kconfig option ARCH_HAVE_NMI_SAFE_CMPXCHG cmpxchg() is widely used by lockless code, including NMI-safe lockless code. But on some architectures, the cmpxchg() implementation is not NMI-safe, on these architectures the lockless code may need a spin_trylock_irqsave() based implementation. This patch adds a Kconfig option: ARCH_HAVE_NMI_SAFE_CMPXCHG, so that NMI-safe lockless code can depend on it or provide different implementation according to it. On many architectures, cmpxchg is only NMI-safe for several specific operand sizes. So, ARCH_HAVE_NMI_SAFE_CMPXCHG define in this patch only guarantees cmpxchg is NMI-safe for sizeof(unsigned long). Signed-off-by: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com> Acked-by: Mike Frysinger <vapier@gentoo.org> Acked-by: Paul Mundt <lethal@linux-sh.org> Acked-by: Hans-Christian Egtvedt <hans-christian.egtvedt@atmel.com> Acked-by: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Acked-by: Chris Metcalf <cmetcalf@tilera.com> Acked-by: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net> CC: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> CC: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp> CC: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com> CC: Hirokazu Takata <takata@linux-m32r.org> CC: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> CC: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu> Acked-by: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> CC: Kyle McMartin <kyle@mcmartin.ca> CC: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> CC: Chen Liqin <liqin.chen@sunplusct.com> CC: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net> CC: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> CC: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net> Signed-off-by: Len Brown <len.brown@intel.com>
10 years ago
mm: soft-dirty bits for user memory changes tracking The soft-dirty is a bit on a PTE which helps to track which pages a task writes to. In order to do this tracking one should 1. Clear soft-dirty bits from PTEs ("echo 4 > /proc/PID/clear_refs) 2. Wait some time. 3. Read soft-dirty bits (55'th in /proc/PID/pagemap2 entries) To do this tracking, the writable bit is cleared from PTEs when the soft-dirty bit is. Thus, after this, when the task tries to modify a page at some virtual address the #PF occurs and the kernel sets the soft-dirty bit on the respective PTE. Note, that although all the task's address space is marked as r/o after the soft-dirty bits clear, the #PF-s that occur after that are processed fast. This is so, since the pages are still mapped to physical memory, and thus all the kernel does is finds this fact out and puts back writable, dirty and soft-dirty bits on the PTE. Another thing to note, is that when mremap moves PTEs they are marked with soft-dirty as well, since from the user perspective mremap modifies the virtual memory at mremap's new address. Signed-off-by: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@parallels.com> Cc: Matt Mackall <mpm@selenic.com> Cc: Xiao Guangrong <xiaoguangrong@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Glauber Costa <glommer@parallels.com> Cc: Marcelo Tosatti <mtosatti@redhat.com> Cc: KOSAKI Motohiro <kosaki.motohiro@gmail.com> Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
8 years ago
9 years ago
uprobes, mm, x86: Add the ability to install and remove uprobes breakpoints Add uprobes support to the core kernel, with x86 support. This commit adds the kernel facilities, the actual uprobes user-space ABI and perf probe support comes in later commits. General design: Uprobes are maintained in an rb-tree indexed by inode and offset (the offset here is from the start of the mapping). For a unique (inode, offset) tuple, there can be at most one uprobe in the rb-tree. Since the (inode, offset) tuple identifies a unique uprobe, more than one user may be interested in the same uprobe. This provides the ability to connect multiple 'consumers' to the same uprobe. Each consumer defines a handler and a filter (optional). The 'handler' is run every time the uprobe is hit, if it matches the 'filter' criteria. The first consumer of a uprobe causes the breakpoint to be inserted at the specified address and subsequent consumers are appended to this list. On subsequent probes, the consumer gets appended to the existing list of consumers. The breakpoint is removed when the last consumer unregisters. For all other unregisterations, the consumer is removed from the list of consumers. Given a inode, we get a list of the mms that have mapped the inode. Do the actual registration if mm maps the page where a probe needs to be inserted/removed. We use a temporary list to walk through the vmas that map the inode. - The number of maps that map the inode, is not known before we walk the rmap and keeps changing. - extending vm_area_struct wasn't recommended, it's a size-critical data structure. - There can be more than one maps of the inode in the same mm. We add callbacks to the mmap methods to keep an eye on text vmas that are of interest to uprobes. When a vma of interest is mapped, we insert the breakpoint at the right address. Uprobe works by replacing the instruction at the address defined by (inode, offset) with the arch specific breakpoint instruction. We save a copy of the original instruction at the uprobed address. This is needed for: a. executing the instruction out-of-line (xol). b. instruction analysis for any subsequent fixups. c. restoring the instruction back when the uprobe is unregistered. We insert or delete a breakpoint instruction, and this breakpoint instruction is assumed to be the smallest instruction available on the platform. For fixed size instruction platforms this is trivially true, for variable size instruction platforms the breakpoint instruction is typically the smallest (often a single byte). Writing the instruction is done by COWing the page and changing the instruction during the copy, this even though most platforms allow atomic writes of the breakpoint instruction. This also mirrors the behaviour of a ptrace() memory write to a PRIVATE file map. The core worker is derived from KSM's replace_page() logic. In essence, similar to KSM: a. allocate a new page and copy over contents of the page that has the uprobed vaddr b. modify the copy and insert the breakpoint at the required address c. switch the original page with the copy containing the breakpoint d. flush page tables. replace_page() is being replicated here because of some minor changes in the type of pages and also because Hugh Dickins had plans to improve replace_page() for KSM specific work. Instruction analysis on x86 is based on instruction decoder and determines if an instruction can be probed and determines the necessary fixups after singlestep. Instruction analysis is done at probe insertion time so that we avoid having to repeat the same analysis every time a probe is hit. A lot of code here is due to the improvement/suggestions/inputs from Peter Zijlstra. Changelog: (v10): - Add code to clear REX.B prefix as suggested by Denys Vlasenko and Masami Hiramatsu. (v9): - Use insn_offset_modrm as suggested by Masami Hiramatsu. (v7): Handle comments from Peter Zijlstra: - Dont take reference to inode. (expect inode to uprobe_register to be sane). - Use PTR_ERR to set the return value. - No need to take reference to inode. - use PTR_ERR to return error value. - register and uprobe_unregister share code. (v5): - Modified del_consumer as per comments from Peter. - Drop reference to inode before dropping reference to uprobe. - Use i_size_read(inode) instead of inode->i_size. - Ensure uprobe->consumers is NULL, before __uprobe_unregister() is called. - Includes errno.h as recommended by Stephen Rothwell to fix a build issue on sparc defconfig - Remove restrictions while unregistering. - Earlier code leaked inode references under some conditions while registering/unregistering. - Continue the vma-rmap walk even if the intermediate vma doesnt meet the requirements. - Validate the vma found by find_vma before inserting/removing the breakpoint - Call del_consumer under mutex_lock. - Use hash locks. - Handle mremap. - Introduce find_least_offset_node() instead of close match logic in find_uprobe - Uprobes no more depends on MM_OWNER; No reference to task_structs while inserting/removing a probe. - Uses read_mapping_page instead of grab_cache_page so that the pages have valid content. - pass NULL to get_user_pages for the task parameter. - call SetPageUptodate on the new page allocated in write_opcode. - fix leaking a reference to the new page under certain conditions. - Include Instruction Decoder if Uprobes gets defined. - Remove const attributes for instruction prefix arrays. - Uses mm_context to know if the application is 32 bit. Signed-off-by: Srikar Dronamraju <srikar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Also-written-by: Jim Keniston <jkenisto@us.ibm.com> Reviewed-by: Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@chello.nl> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com> Cc: Andi Kleen <andi@firstfloor.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> Cc: Roland McGrath <roland@hack.frob.com> Cc: Masami Hiramatsu <masami.hiramatsu.pt@hitachi.com> Cc: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@infradead.org> Cc: Anton Arapov <anton@redhat.com> Cc: Ananth N Mavinakayanahalli <ananth@in.ibm.com> Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au> Cc: Denys Vlasenko <vda.linux@googlemail.com> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Linux-mm <linux-mm@kvack.org> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20120209092642.GE16600@linux.vnet.ibm.com [ Made various small edits to the commit log ] Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
10 years ago
container freezer: implement freezer cgroup subsystem This patch implements a new freezer subsystem in the control groups framework. It provides a way to stop and resume execution of all tasks in a cgroup by writing in the cgroup filesystem. The freezer subsystem in the container filesystem defines a file named freezer.state. Writing "FROZEN" to the state file will freeze all tasks in the cgroup. Subsequently writing "RUNNING" will unfreeze the tasks in the cgroup. Reading will return the current state. * Examples of usage : # mkdir /containers/freezer # mount -t cgroup -ofreezer freezer /containers # mkdir /containers/0 # echo $some_pid > /containers/0/tasks to get status of the freezer subsystem : # cat /containers/0/freezer.state RUNNING to freeze all tasks in the container : # echo FROZEN > /containers/0/freezer.state # cat /containers/0/freezer.state FREEZING # cat /containers/0/freezer.state FROZEN to unfreeze all tasks in the container : # echo RUNNING > /containers/0/freezer.state # cat /containers/0/freezer.state RUNNING This is the basic mechanism which should do the right thing for user space task in a simple scenario. It's important to note that freezing can be incomplete. In that case we return EBUSY. This means that some tasks in the cgroup are busy doing something that prevents us from completely freezing the cgroup at this time. After EBUSY, the cgroup will remain partially frozen -- reflected by freezer.state reporting "FREEZING" when read. The state will remain "FREEZING" until one of these things happens: 1) Userspace cancels the freezing operation by writing "RUNNING" to the freezer.state file 2) Userspace retries the freezing operation by writing "FROZEN" to the freezer.state file (writing "FREEZING" is not legal and returns EIO) 3) The tasks that blocked the cgroup from entering the "FROZEN" state disappear from the cgroup's set of tasks. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: export thaw_process] Signed-off-by: Cedric Le Goater <clg@fr.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Matt Helsley <matthltc@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: Serge E. Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Tested-by: Matt Helsley <matthltc@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
13 years ago
x86: Fix performance regression caused by paravirt_ops on native kernels Xiaohui Xin and some other folks at Intel have been looking into what's behind the performance hit of paravirt_ops when running native. It appears that the hit is entirely due to the paravirtualized spinlocks introduced by: | commit 8efcbab674de2bee45a2e4cdf97de16b8e609ac8 | Date: Mon Jul 7 12:07:51 2008 -0700 | | paravirt: introduce a "lock-byte" spinlock implementation The extra call/return in the spinlock path is somehow causing an increase in the cycles/instruction of somewhere around 2-7% (seems to vary quite a lot from test to test). The working theory is that the CPU's pipeline is getting upset about the call->call->locked-op->return->return, and seems to be failing to speculate (though I haven't seen anything definitive about the precise reasons). This doesn't entirely make sense, because the performance hit is also visible on unlock and other operations which don't involve locked instructions. But spinlock operations clearly swamp all the other pvops operations, even though I can't imagine that they're nearly as common (there's only a .05% increase in instructions executed). If I disable just the pv-spinlock calls, my tests show that pvops is identical to non-pvops performance on native (my measurements show that it is actually about .1% faster, but Xiaohui shows a .05% slowdown). Summary of results, averaging 10 runs of the "mmperf" test, using a no-pvops build as baseline: nopv Pv-nospin Pv-spin CPU cycles 100.00% 99.89% 102.18% instructions 100.00% 100.10% 100.15% CPI 100.00% 99.79% 102.03% cache ref 100.00% 100.84% 100.28% cache miss 100.00% 90.47% 88.56% cache miss rate 100.00% 89.72% 88.31% branches 100.00% 99.93% 100.04% branch miss 100.00% 103.66% 107.72% branch miss rt 100.00% 103.73% 107.67% wallclock 100.00% 99.90% 102.20% The clear effect here is that the 2% increase in CPI is directly reflected in the final wallclock time. (The other interesting effect is that the more ops are out of line calls via pvops, the lower the cache access and miss rates. Not too surprising, but it suggests that the non-pvops kernel is over-inlined. On the flipside, the branch misses go up correspondingly...) So, what's the fix? Paravirt patching turns all the pvops calls into direct calls, so _spin_lock etc do end up having direct calls. For example, the compiler generated code for paravirtualized _spin_lock is: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq *0xffffffff805a5b30 <_spin_lock+22>: retq The indirect call will get patched to: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq <__ticket_spin_lock> <_spin_lock+20>: nop; nop /* or whatever 2-byte nop */ <_spin_lock+22>: retq One possibility is to inline _spin_lock, etc, when building an optimised kernel (ie, when there's no spinlock/preempt instrumentation/debugging enabled). That will remove the outer call/return pair, returning the instruction stream to a single call/return, which will presumably execute the same as the non-pvops case. The downsides arel 1) it will replicate the preempt_disable/enable code at eack lock/unlock callsite; this code is fairly small, but not nothing; and 2) the spinlock definitions are already a very heavily tangled mass of #ifdefs and other preprocessor magic, and making any changes will be non-trivial. The other obvious answer is to disable pv-spinlocks. Making them a separate config option is fairly easy, and it would be trivial to enable them only when Xen is enabled (as the only non-default user). But it doesn't really address the common case of a distro build which is going to have Xen support enabled, and leaves the open question of whether the native performance cost of pv-spinlocks is worth the performance improvement on a loaded Xen system (10% saving of overall system CPU when guests block rather than spin). Still it is a reasonable short-term workaround. [ Impact: fix pvops performance regression when running native ] Analysed-by: "Xin Xiaohui" <xiaohui.xin@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Li Xin" <xin.li@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Nakajima Jun" <jun.nakajima@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy.fitzhardinge@citrix.com> Acked-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Nick Piggin <npiggin@suse.de> Cc: Xen-devel <xen-devel@lists.xensource.com> LKML-Reference: <4A0B62F7.5030802@goop.org> [ fixed the help text ] Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
x86: Fix performance regression caused by paravirt_ops on native kernels Xiaohui Xin and some other folks at Intel have been looking into what's behind the performance hit of paravirt_ops when running native. It appears that the hit is entirely due to the paravirtualized spinlocks introduced by: | commit 8efcbab674de2bee45a2e4cdf97de16b8e609ac8 | Date: Mon Jul 7 12:07:51 2008 -0700 | | paravirt: introduce a "lock-byte" spinlock implementation The extra call/return in the spinlock path is somehow causing an increase in the cycles/instruction of somewhere around 2-7% (seems to vary quite a lot from test to test). The working theory is that the CPU's pipeline is getting upset about the call->call->locked-op->return->return, and seems to be failing to speculate (though I haven't seen anything definitive about the precise reasons). This doesn't entirely make sense, because the performance hit is also visible on unlock and other operations which don't involve locked instructions. But spinlock operations clearly swamp all the other pvops operations, even though I can't imagine that they're nearly as common (there's only a .05% increase in instructions executed). If I disable just the pv-spinlock calls, my tests show that pvops is identical to non-pvops performance on native (my measurements show that it is actually about .1% faster, but Xiaohui shows a .05% slowdown). Summary of results, averaging 10 runs of the "mmperf" test, using a no-pvops build as baseline: nopv Pv-nospin Pv-spin CPU cycles 100.00% 99.89% 102.18% instructions 100.00% 100.10% 100.15% CPI 100.00% 99.79% 102.03% cache ref 100.00% 100.84% 100.28% cache miss 100.00% 90.47% 88.56% cache miss rate 100.00% 89.72% 88.31% branches 100.00% 99.93% 100.04% branch miss 100.00% 103.66% 107.72% branch miss rt 100.00% 103.73% 107.67% wallclock 100.00% 99.90% 102.20% The clear effect here is that the 2% increase in CPI is directly reflected in the final wallclock time. (The other interesting effect is that the more ops are out of line calls via pvops, the lower the cache access and miss rates. Not too surprising, but it suggests that the non-pvops kernel is over-inlined. On the flipside, the branch misses go up correspondingly...) So, what's the fix? Paravirt patching turns all the pvops calls into direct calls, so _spin_lock etc do end up having direct calls. For example, the compiler generated code for paravirtualized _spin_lock is: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq *0xffffffff805a5b30 <_spin_lock+22>: retq The indirect call will get patched to: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq <__ticket_spin_lock> <_spin_lock+20>: nop; nop /* or whatever 2-byte nop */ <_spin_lock+22>: retq One possibility is to inline _spin_lock, etc, when building an optimised kernel (ie, when there's no spinlock/preempt instrumentation/debugging enabled). That will remove the outer call/return pair, returning the instruction stream to a single call/return, which will presumably execute the same as the non-pvops case. The downsides arel 1) it will replicate the preempt_disable/enable code at eack lock/unlock callsite; this code is fairly small, but not nothing; and 2) the spinlock definitions are already a very heavily tangled mass of #ifdefs and other preprocessor magic, and making any changes will be non-trivial. The other obvious answer is to disable pv-spinlocks. Making them a separate config option is fairly easy, and it would be trivial to enable them only when Xen is enabled (as the only non-default user). But it doesn't really address the common case of a distro build which is going to have Xen support enabled, and leaves the open question of whether the native performance cost of pv-spinlocks is worth the performance improvement on a loaded Xen system (10% saving of overall system CPU when guests block rather than spin). Still it is a reasonable short-term workaround. [ Impact: fix pvops performance regression when running native ] Analysed-by: "Xin Xiaohui" <xiaohui.xin@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Li Xin" <xin.li@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Nakajima Jun" <jun.nakajima@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy.fitzhardinge@citrix.com> Acked-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Nick Piggin <npiggin@suse.de> Cc: Xen-devel <xen-devel@lists.xensource.com> LKML-Reference: <4A0B62F7.5030802@goop.org> [ fixed the help text ] Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
x86: Fix performance regression caused by paravirt_ops on native kernels Xiaohui Xin and some other folks at Intel have been looking into what's behind the performance hit of paravirt_ops when running native. It appears that the hit is entirely due to the paravirtualized spinlocks introduced by: | commit 8efcbab674de2bee45a2e4cdf97de16b8e609ac8 | Date: Mon Jul 7 12:07:51 2008 -0700 | | paravirt: introduce a "lock-byte" spinlock implementation The extra call/return in the spinlock path is somehow causing an increase in the cycles/instruction of somewhere around 2-7% (seems to vary quite a lot from test to test). The working theory is that the CPU's pipeline is getting upset about the call->call->locked-op->return->return, and seems to be failing to speculate (though I haven't seen anything definitive about the precise reasons). This doesn't entirely make sense, because the performance hit is also visible on unlock and other operations which don't involve locked instructions. But spinlock operations clearly swamp all the other pvops operations, even though I can't imagine that they're nearly as common (there's only a .05% increase in instructions executed). If I disable just the pv-spinlock calls, my tests show that pvops is identical to non-pvops performance on native (my measurements show that it is actually about .1% faster, but Xiaohui shows a .05% slowdown). Summary of results, averaging 10 runs of the "mmperf" test, using a no-pvops build as baseline: nopv Pv-nospin Pv-spin CPU cycles 100.00% 99.89% 102.18% instructions 100.00% 100.10% 100.15% CPI 100.00% 99.79% 102.03% cache ref 100.00% 100.84% 100.28% cache miss 100.00% 90.47% 88.56% cache miss rate 100.00% 89.72% 88.31% branches 100.00% 99.93% 100.04% branch miss 100.00% 103.66% 107.72% branch miss rt 100.00% 103.73% 107.67% wallclock 100.00% 99.90% 102.20% The clear effect here is that the 2% increase in CPI is directly reflected in the final wallclock time. (The other interesting effect is that the more ops are out of line calls via pvops, the lower the cache access and miss rates. Not too surprising, but it suggests that the non-pvops kernel is over-inlined. On the flipside, the branch misses go up correspondingly...) So, what's the fix? Paravirt patching turns all the pvops calls into direct calls, so _spin_lock etc do end up having direct calls. For example, the compiler generated code for paravirtualized _spin_lock is: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq *0xffffffff805a5b30 <_spin_lock+22>: retq The indirect call will get patched to: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq <__ticket_spin_lock> <_spin_lock+20>: nop; nop /* or whatever 2-byte nop */ <_spin_lock+22>: retq One possibility is to inline _spin_lock, etc, when building an optimised kernel (ie, when there's no spinlock/preempt instrumentation/debugging enabled). That will remove the outer call/return pair, returning the instruction stream to a single call/return, which will presumably execute the same as the non-pvops case. The downsides arel 1) it will replicate the preempt_disable/enable code at eack lock/unlock callsite; this code is fairly small, but not nothing; and 2) the spinlock definitions are already a very heavily tangled mass of #ifdefs and other preprocessor magic, and making any changes will be non-trivial. The other obvious answer is to disable pv-spinlocks. Making them a separate config option is fairly easy, and it would be trivial to enable them only when Xen is enabled (as the only non-default user). But it doesn't really address the common case of a distro build which is going to have Xen support enabled, and leaves the open question of whether the native performance cost of pv-spinlocks is worth the performance improvement on a loaded Xen system (10% saving of overall system CPU when guests block rather than spin). Still it is a reasonable short-term workaround. [ Impact: fix pvops performance regression when running native ] Analysed-by: "Xin Xiaohui" <xiaohui.xin@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Li Xin" <xin.li@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Nakajima Jun" <jun.nakajima@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy.fitzhardinge@citrix.com> Acked-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Nick Piggin <npiggin@suse.de> Cc: Xen-devel <xen-devel@lists.xensource.com> LKML-Reference: <4A0B62F7.5030802@goop.org> [ fixed the help text ] Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
x86: Fix performance regression caused by paravirt_ops on native kernels Xiaohui Xin and some other folks at Intel have been looking into what's behind the performance hit of paravirt_ops when running native. It appears that the hit is entirely due to the paravirtualized spinlocks introduced by: | commit 8efcbab674de2bee45a2e4cdf97de16b8e609ac8 | Date: Mon Jul 7 12:07:51 2008 -0700 | | paravirt: introduce a "lock-byte" spinlock implementation The extra call/return in the spinlock path is somehow causing an increase in the cycles/instruction of somewhere around 2-7% (seems to vary quite a lot from test to test). The working theory is that the CPU's pipeline is getting upset about the call->call->locked-op->return->return, and seems to be failing to speculate (though I haven't seen anything definitive about the precise reasons). This doesn't entirely make sense, because the performance hit is also visible on unlock and other operations which don't involve locked instructions. But spinlock operations clearly swamp all the other pvops operations, even though I can't imagine that they're nearly as common (there's only a .05% increase in instructions executed). If I disable just the pv-spinlock calls, my tests show that pvops is identical to non-pvops performance on native (my measurements show that it is actually about .1% faster, but Xiaohui shows a .05% slowdown). Summary of results, averaging 10 runs of the "mmperf" test, using a no-pvops build as baseline: nopv Pv-nospin Pv-spin CPU cycles 100.00% 99.89% 102.18% instructions 100.00% 100.10% 100.15% CPI 100.00% 99.79% 102.03% cache ref 100.00% 100.84% 100.28% cache miss 100.00% 90.47% 88.56% cache miss rate 100.00% 89.72% 88.31% branches 100.00% 99.93% 100.04% branch miss 100.00% 103.66% 107.72% branch miss rt 100.00% 103.73% 107.67% wallclock 100.00% 99.90% 102.20% The clear effect here is that the 2% increase in CPI is directly reflected in the final wallclock time. (The other interesting effect is that the more ops are out of line calls via pvops, the lower the cache access and miss rates. Not too surprising, but it suggests that the non-pvops kernel is over-inlined. On the flipside, the branch misses go up correspondingly...) So, what's the fix? Paravirt patching turns all the pvops calls into direct calls, so _spin_lock etc do end up having direct calls. For example, the compiler generated code for paravirtualized _spin_lock is: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq *0xffffffff805a5b30 <_spin_lock+22>: retq The indirect call will get patched to: <_spin_lock+0>: mov %gs:0xb4c8,%rax <_spin_lock+9>: incl 0xffffffffffffe044(%rax) <_spin_lock+15>: callq <__ticket_spin_lock> <_spin_lock+20>: nop; nop /* or whatever 2-byte nop */ <_spin_lock+22>: retq One possibility is to inline _spin_lock, etc, when building an optimised kernel (ie, when there's no spinlock/preempt instrumentation/debugging enabled). That will remove the outer call/return pair, returning the instruction stream to a single call/return, which will presumably execute the same as the non-pvops case. The downsides arel 1) it will replicate the preempt_disable/enable code at eack lock/unlock callsite; this code is fairly small, but not nothing; and 2) the spinlock definitions are already a very heavily tangled mass of #ifdefs and other preprocessor magic, and making any changes will be non-trivial. The other obvious answer is to disable pv-spinlocks. Making them a separate config option is fairly easy, and it would be trivial to enable them only when Xen is enabled (as the only non-default user). But it doesn't really address the common case of a distro build which is going to have Xen support enabled, and leaves the open question of whether the native performance cost of pv-spinlocks is worth the performance improvement on a loaded Xen system (10% saving of overall system CPU when guests block rather than spin). Still it is a reasonable short-term workaround. [ Impact: fix pvops performance regression when running native ] Analysed-by: "Xin Xiaohui" <xiaohui.xin@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Li Xin" <xin.li@intel.com> Analysed-by: "Nakajima Jun" <jun.nakajima@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy.fitzhardinge@citrix.com> Acked-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Nick Piggin <npiggin@suse.de> Cc: Xen-devel <xen-devel@lists.xensource.com> LKML-Reference: <4A0B62F7.5030802@goop.org> [ fixed the help text ] Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
x86, build, pci: Fix PCI_MSI build on !SMP Commit ebd97be635 ('PCI: remove ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI kconfig option') removed the ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI option which architectures could select to indicate that they support MSI. Now, all architectures are supposed to build fine when MSI support is enabled: instead of having the architecture tell *when* MSI support can be used, it's up to the architecture code to ensure that MSI support can be enabled. On x86, commit ebd97be635 removed the following line: select ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI if (X86_LOCAL_APIC && X86_IO_APIC) Which meant that MSI support was only available when the local APIC and I/O APIC were enabled. While this is always true on SMP or x86-64, it is not necessarily the case on i386 !SMP. The below patch makes sure that the local APIC and I/O APIC support is always enabled when MSI support is enabled. To do so, it: * Ensures the X86_UP_APIC option is not visible when PCI_MSI is enabled. This is the option that allows, on UP machines, to enable or not the APIC support. It is already not visible on SMP systems, or x86-64 systems, for example. We're simply also making it invisible on i386 MSI systems. * Ensures that the X86_LOCAL_APIC and X86_IO_APIC options are 'y' when PCI_MSI is enabled. Notice that this change requires a change in drivers/iommu/Kconfig to avoid a recursive Kconfig dependencey. The AMD_IOMMU option selects PCI_MSI, but was depending on X86_IO_APIC. This dependency is no longer needed: as soon as PCI_MSI is selected, the presence of X86_IO_APIC is guaranteed. Moreover, the AMD_IOMMU already depended on X86_64, which already guaranteed that X86_IO_APIC was enabled, so this dependency was anyway redundant. Signed-off-by: Thomas Petazzoni <thomas.petazzoni@free-electrons.com> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1380794354-9079-1-git-send-email-thomas.petazzoni@free-electrons.com Reported-by: Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk <konrad.wilk@oracle.com> Acked-by: Bjorn Helgaas <bhelgaas@google.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@linux.intel.com>
8 years ago
x86, build, pci: Fix PCI_MSI build on !SMP Commit ebd97be635 ('PCI: remove ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI kconfig option') removed the ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI option which architectures could select to indicate that they support MSI. Now, all architectures are supposed to build fine when MSI support is enabled: instead of having the architecture tell *when* MSI support can be used, it's up to the architecture code to ensure that MSI support can be enabled. On x86, commit ebd97be635 removed the following line: select ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI if (X86_LOCAL_APIC && X86_IO_APIC) Which meant that MSI support was only available when the local APIC and I/O APIC were enabled. While this is always true on SMP or x86-64, it is not necessarily the case on i386 !SMP. The below patch makes sure that the local APIC and I/O APIC support is always enabled when MSI support is enabled. To do so, it: * Ensures the X86_UP_APIC option is not visible when PCI_MSI is enabled. This is the option that allows, on UP machines, to enable or not the APIC support. It is already not visible on SMP systems, or x86-64 systems, for example. We're simply also making it invisible on i386 MSI systems. * Ensures that the X86_LOCAL_APIC and X86_IO_APIC options are 'y' when PCI_MSI is enabled. Notice that this change requires a change in drivers/iommu/Kconfig to avoid a recursive Kconfig dependencey. The AMD_IOMMU option selects PCI_MSI, but was depending on X86_IO_APIC. This dependency is no longer needed: as soon as PCI_MSI is selected, the presence of X86_IO_APIC is guaranteed. Moreover, the AMD_IOMMU already depended on X86_64, which already guaranteed that X86_IO_APIC was enabled, so this dependency was anyway redundant. Signed-off-by: Thomas Petazzoni <thomas.petazzoni@free-electrons.com> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1380794354-9079-1-git-send-email-thomas.petazzoni@free-electrons.com Reported-by: Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk <konrad.wilk@oracle.com> Acked-by: Bjorn Helgaas <bhelgaas@google.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@linux.intel.com>
8 years ago
x86, build, pci: Fix PCI_MSI build on !SMP Commit ebd97be635 ('PCI: remove ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI kconfig option') removed the ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI option which architectures could select to indicate that they support MSI. Now, all architectures are supposed to build fine when MSI support is enabled: instead of having the architecture tell *when* MSI support can be used, it's up to the architecture code to ensure that MSI support can be enabled. On x86, commit ebd97be635 removed the following line: select ARCH_SUPPORTS_MSI if (X86_LOCAL_APIC && X86_IO_APIC) Which meant that MSI support was only available when the local APIC and I/O APIC were enabled. While this is always true on SMP or x86-64, it is not necessarily the case on i386 !SMP. The below patch makes sure that the local APIC and I/O APIC support is always enabled when MSI support is enabled. To do so, it: * Ensures the X86_UP_APIC option is not visible when PCI_MSI is enabled. This is the option that allows, on UP machines, to enable or not the APIC support. It is already not visible on SMP systems, or x86-64 systems, for example. We're simply also making it invisible on i386 MSI systems. * Ensures that the X86_LOCAL_APIC and X86_IO_APIC options are 'y' when PCI_MSI is enabled. Notice that this change requires a change in drivers/iommu/Kconfig to avoid a recursive Kconfig dependencey. The AMD_IOMMU option selects PCI_MSI, but was depending on X86_IO_APIC. This dependency is no longer needed: as soon as PCI_MSI is selected, the presence of X86_IO_APIC is guaranteed. Moreover, the AMD_IOMMU already depended on X86_64, which already guaranteed that X86_IO_APIC was enabled, so this dependency was anyway redundant. Signed-off-by: Thomas Petazzoni <thomas.petazzoni@free-electrons.com> Link: http://lkml.kernel.org/r/1380794354-9079-1-git-send-email-thomas.petazzoni@free-electrons.com Reported-by: Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk <konrad.wilk@oracle.com> Acked-by: Bjorn Helgaas <bhelgaas@google.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@linux.intel.com>
8 years ago
x86, mce: use 64bit machine check code on 32bit The 64bit machine check code is in many ways much better than the 32bit machine check code: it is more specification compliant, is cleaner, only has a single code base versus one per CPU, has better infrastructure for recovery, has a cleaner way to communicate with user space etc. etc. Use the 64bit code for 32bit too. This is the second attempt to do this. There was one a couple of years ago to unify this code for 32bit and 64bit. Back then this ran into some trouble with K7s and was reverted. I believe this time the K7 problems (and some others) are addressed. I went over the old handlers and was very careful to retain all quirks. But of course this needs a lot of testing on old systems. On newer 64bit capable systems I don't expect much problems because they have been already tested with the 64bit kernel. I made this a CONFIG for now that still allows to select the old machine check code. This is mostly to make testing easier, if someone runs into a problem we can ask them to try with the CONFIG switched. The new code is default y for more coverage. Once there is confidence the 64bit code works well on older hardware too the CONFIG_X86_OLD_MCE and the associated code can be easily removed. This causes a behaviour change for 32bit installations. They now have to install the mcelog package to be able to log corrected machine checks. The 64bit machine check code only handles CPUs which support the standard Intel machine check architecture described in the IA32 SDM. The 32bit code has special support for some older CPUs which have non standard machine check architectures, in particular WinChip C3 and Intel P5. I made those a separate CONFIG option and kept them for now. The WinChip variant could be probably removed without too much pain, it doesn't really do anything interesting. P5 is also disabled by default (like it was before) because many motherboards have it miswired, but according to Alan Cox a few embedded setups use that one. Forward ported/heavily changed version of old patch, original patch included review/fixes from Thomas Gleixner, Bert Wesarg. Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Signed-off-by: Hidetoshi Seto <seto.hidetoshi@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
13 years ago
x86, mce: use 64bit machine check code on 32bit The 64bit machine check code is in many ways much better than the 32bit machine check code: it is more specification compliant, is cleaner, only has a single code base versus one per CPU, has better infrastructure for recovery, has a cleaner way to communicate with user space etc. etc. Use the 64bit code for 32bit too. This is the second attempt to do this. There was one a couple of years ago to unify this code for 32bit and 64bit. Back then this ran into some trouble with K7s and was reverted. I believe this time the K7 problems (and some others) are addressed. I went over the old handlers and was very careful to retain all quirks. But of course this needs a lot of testing on old systems. On newer 64bit capable systems I don't expect much problems because they have been already tested with the 64bit kernel. I made this a CONFIG for now that still allows to select the old machine check code. This is mostly to make testing easier, if someone runs into a problem we can ask them to try with the CONFIG switched. The new code is default y for more coverage. Once there is confidence the 64bit code works well on older hardware too the CONFIG_X86_OLD_MCE and the associated code can be easily removed. This causes a behaviour change for 32bit installations. They now have to install the mcelog package to be able to log corrected machine checks. The 64bit machine check code only handles CPUs which support the standard Intel machine check architecture described in the IA32 SDM. The 32bit code has special support for some older CPUs which have non standard machine check architectures, in particular WinChip C3 and Intel P5. I made those a separate CONFIG option and kept them for now. The WinChip variant could be probably removed without too much pain, it doesn't really do anything interesting. P5 is also disabled by default (like it was before) because many motherboards have it miswired, but according to Alan Cox a few embedded setups use that one. Forward ported/heavily changed version of old patch, original patch included review/fixes from Thomas Gleixner, Bert Wesarg. Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Signed-off-by: Hidetoshi Seto <seto.hidetoshi@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
13 years ago
x86, mce: use 64bit machine check code on 32bit The 64bit machine check code is in many ways much better than the 32bit machine check code: it is more specification compliant, is cleaner, only has a single code base versus one per CPU, has better infrastructure for recovery, has a cleaner way to communicate with user space etc. etc. Use the 64bit code for 32bit too. This is the second attempt to do this. There was one a couple of years ago to unify this code for 32bit and 64bit. Back then this ran into some trouble with K7s and was reverted. I believe this time the K7 problems (and some others) are addressed. I went over the old handlers and was very careful to retain all quirks. But of course this needs a lot of testing on old systems. On newer 64bit capable systems I don't expect much problems because they have been already tested with the 64bit kernel. I made this a CONFIG for now that still allows to select the old machine check code. This is mostly to make testing easier, if someone runs into a problem we can ask them to try with the CONFIG switched. The new code is default y for more coverage. Once there is confidence the 64bit code works well on older hardware too the CONFIG_X86_OLD_MCE and the associated code can be easily removed. This causes a behaviour change for 32bit installations. They now have to install the mcelog package to be able to log corrected machine checks. The 64bit machine check code only handles CPUs which support the standard Intel machine check architecture described in the IA32 SDM. The 32bit code has special support for some older CPUs which have non standard machine check architectures, in particular WinChip C3 and Intel P5. I made those a separate CONFIG option and kept them for now. The WinChip variant could be probably removed without too much pain, it doesn't really do anything interesting. P5 is also disabled by default (like it was before) because many motherboards have it miswired, but according to Alan Cox a few embedded setups use that one. Forward ported/heavily changed version of old patch, original patch included review/fixes from Thomas Gleixner, Bert Wesarg. Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Signed-off-by: Hidetoshi Seto <seto.hidetoshi@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
13 years ago
x86, mce: use 64bit machine check code on 32bit The 64bit machine check code is in many ways much better than the 32bit machine check code: it is more specification compliant, is cleaner, only has a single code base versus one per CPU, has better infrastructure for recovery, has a cleaner way to communicate with user space etc. etc. Use the 64bit code for 32bit too. This is the second attempt to do this. There was one a couple of years ago to unify this code for 32bit and 64bit. Back then this ran into some trouble with K7s and was reverted. I believe this time the K7 problems (and some others) are addressed. I went over the old handlers and was very careful to retain all quirks. But of course this needs a lot of testing on old systems. On newer 64bit capable systems I don't expect much problems because they have been already tested with the 64bit kernel. I made this a CONFIG for now that still allows to select the old machine check code. This is mostly to make testing easier, if someone runs into a problem we can ask them to try with the CONFIG switched. The new code is default y for more coverage. Once there is confidence the 64bit code works well on older hardware too the CONFIG_X86_OLD_MCE and the associated code can be easily removed. This causes a behaviour change for 32bit installations. They now have to install the mcelog package to be able to log corrected machine checks. The 64bit machine check code only handles CPUs which support the standard Intel machine check architecture described in the IA32 SDM. The 32bit code has special support for some older CPUs which have non standard machine check architectures, in particular WinChip C3 and Intel P5. I made those a separate CONFIG option and kept them for now. The WinChip variant could be probably removed without too much pain, it doesn't really do anything interesting. P5 is also disabled by default (like it was before) because many motherboards have it miswired, but according to Alan Cox a few embedded setups use that one. Forward ported/heavily changed version of old patch, original patch included review/fixes from Thomas Gleixner, Bert Wesarg. Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Signed-off-by: Hidetoshi Seto <seto.hidetoshi@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
13 years ago
x86, mce: use 64bit machine check code on 32bit The 64bit machine check code is in many ways much better than the 32bit machine check code: it is more specification compliant, is cleaner, only has a single code base versus one per CPU, has better infrastructure for recovery, has a cleaner way to communicate with user space etc. etc. Use the 64bit code for 32bit too. This is the second attempt to do this. There was one a couple of years ago to unify this code for 32bit and 64bit. Back then this ran into some trouble with K7s and was reverted. I believe this time the K7 problems (and some others) are addressed. I went over the old handlers and was very careful to retain all quirks. But of course this needs a lot of testing on old systems. On newer 64bit capable systems I don't expect much problems because they have been already tested with the 64bit kernel. I made this a CONFIG for now that still allows to select the old machine check code. This is mostly to make testing easier, if someone runs into a problem we can ask them to try with the CONFIG switched. The new code is default y for more coverage. Once there is confidence the 64bit code works well on older hardware too the CONFIG_X86_OLD_MCE and the associated code can be easily removed. This causes a behaviour change for 32bit installations. They now have to install the mcelog package to be able to log corrected machine checks. The 64bit machine check code only handles CPUs which support the standard Intel machine check architecture described in the IA32 SDM. The 32bit code has special support for some older CPUs which have non standard machine check architectures, in particular WinChip C3 and Intel P5. I made those a separate CONFIG option and kept them for now. The WinChip variant could be probably removed without too much pain, it doesn't really do anything interesting. P5 is also disabled by default (like it was before) because many motherboards have it miswired, but according to Alan Cox a few embedded setups use that one. Forward ported/heavily changed version of old patch, original patch included review/fixes from Thomas Gleixner, Bert Wesarg. Signed-off-by: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com> Signed-off-by: Hidetoshi Seto <seto.hidetoshi@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@zytor.com>
13 years ago