original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
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/*
* linux/fs/nfs/super.c
*
* Copyright (C) 1992 Rick Sladkey
*
* nfs superblock handling functions
*
* Modularised by Alan Cox <Alan.Cox@linux.org>, while hacking some
* experimental NFS changes. Modularisation taken straight from SYS5 fs.
*
* Change to nfs_read_super() to permit NFS mounts to multi-homed hosts.
* J.S.Peatfield@damtp.cam.ac.uk
*
* Split from inode.c by David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
*
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
* - superblocks are indexed on server only - all inodes, dentries, etc. associated with a
* particular server are held in the same superblock
* - NFS superblocks can have several effective roots to the dentry tree
* - directory type roots are spliced into the tree when a path from one root reaches the root
* of another (see nfs_lookup())
*/
#include <linux/module.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/time.h>
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/mm.h>
#include <linux/string.h>
#include <linux/stat.h>
#include <linux/errno.h>
#include <linux/unistd.h>
#include <linux/sunrpc/clnt.h>
#include <linux/sunrpc/stats.h>
#include <linux/sunrpc/metrics.h>
#include <linux/sunrpc/xprtsock.h>
#include <linux/sunrpc/xprtrdma.h>
#include <linux/nfs_fs.h>
#include <linux/nfs_mount.h>
#include <linux/nfs4_mount.h>
#include <linux/lockd/bind.h>
#include <linux/smp_lock.h>
#include <linux/seq_file.h>
#include <linux/mount.h>
#include <linux/nfs_idmap.h>
#include <linux/vfs.h>
#include <linux/inet.h>
#include <linux/in6.h>
#include <net/ipv6.h>
#include <linux/netdevice.h>
#include <linux/nfs_xdr.h>
#include <linux/magic.h>
#include <linux/parser.h>
#include <asm/system.h>
#include <asm/uaccess.h>
#include "nfs4_fs.h"
#include "callback.h"
#include "delegation.h"
#include "iostat.h"
#include "internal.h"
#define NFSDBG_FACILITY NFSDBG_VFS
enum {
/* Mount options that take no arguments */
Opt_soft, Opt_hard,
Opt_posix, Opt_noposix,
Opt_cto, Opt_nocto,
Opt_ac, Opt_noac,
Opt_lock, Opt_nolock,
Opt_v2, Opt_v3,
Opt_udp, Opt_tcp, Opt_rdma,
Opt_acl, Opt_noacl,
Opt_rdirplus, Opt_nordirplus,
Opt_sharecache, Opt_nosharecache,
/* Mount options that take integer arguments */
Opt_port,
Opt_rsize, Opt_wsize, Opt_bsize,
Opt_timeo, Opt_retrans,
Opt_acregmin, Opt_acregmax,
Opt_acdirmin, Opt_acdirmax,
Opt_actimeo,
Opt_namelen,
Opt_mountport,
Opt_mountvers,
Opt_nfsvers,
/* Mount options that take string arguments */
Opt_sec, Opt_proto, Opt_mountproto, Opt_mounthost,
Opt_addr, Opt_mountaddr, Opt_clientaddr,
NFS: Allow either strict or sloppy mount option parsing The kernel's NFS client mount option parser currently doesn't allow unrecognized or incorrect mount options. This prevents misspellings or incorrectly specified mount options from possibly causing silent data corruption. However, NFS mount options are not standardized, so different operating systems can use differently spelled mount options to support similar features, or can support mount options which no other operating system supports. "Sloppy" mount option parsing, which allows the parser to ignore any option it doesn't recognize, is needed to support automounters that often use maps that are shared between heterogenous operating systems. The legacy mount command ignores the validity of the values of mount options entirely, except for the "sec=" and "proto=" options. If an incorrect value is specified, the out-of-range value is passed to the kernel; if a value is specified that contains non-numeric characters, it appears as though the legacy mount command sets that option to zero (probably incorrect behavior in general). In any case, this sets a precedent which we will partially follow for the kernel mount option parser: + if "sloppy" is not set, the parser will be strict about both unrecognized options (same as legacy) and invalid option values (stricter than legacy) + if "sloppy" is set, the parser will ignore unrecognized options and invalid option values (same as legacy) An "invalid" option value in this case means that either the type (integer, short, or string) or sign (for integer values) of the specified value is incorrect. This patch does two things: it changes the NFS client's mount option parsing loop so that it parses the whole string instead of failing at the first unrecognized option or invalid option value. An unrecognized option or an invalid option value cause the option to be skipped. Then, the patch adds a "sloppy" mount option that allows the parsing to succeed anyway if there were any problems during parsing. When parsing a set of options is complete, if there are errors and "sloppy" was specified, return success anyway. Otherwise, only return success if there are no errors. Signed-off-by: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
14 years ago
/* Special mount options */
Opt_userspace, Opt_deprecated, Opt_sloppy,
Opt_err
};
static const match_table_t nfs_mount_option_tokens = {
{ Opt_userspace, "bg" },
{ Opt_userspace, "fg" },
{ Opt_userspace, "retry=%s" },
NFS: Allow either strict or sloppy mount option parsing The kernel's NFS client mount option parser currently doesn't allow unrecognized or incorrect mount options. This prevents misspellings or incorrectly specified mount options from possibly causing silent data corruption. However, NFS mount options are not standardized, so different operating systems can use differently spelled mount options to support similar features, or can support mount options which no other operating system supports. "Sloppy" mount option parsing, which allows the parser to ignore any option it doesn't recognize, is needed to support automounters that often use maps that are shared between heterogenous operating systems. The legacy mount command ignores the validity of the values of mount options entirely, except for the "sec=" and "proto=" options. If an incorrect value is specified, the out-of-range value is passed to the kernel; if a value is specified that contains non-numeric characters, it appears as though the legacy mount command sets that option to zero (probably incorrect behavior in general). In any case, this sets a precedent which we will partially follow for the kernel mount option parser: + if "sloppy" is not set, the parser will be strict about both unrecognized options (same as legacy) and invalid option values (stricter than legacy) + if "sloppy" is set, the parser will ignore unrecognized options and invalid option values (same as legacy) An "invalid" option value in this case means that either the type (integer, short, or string) or sign (for integer values) of the specified value is incorrect. This patch does two things: it changes the NFS client's mount option parsing loop so that it parses the whole string instead of failing at the first unrecognized option or invalid option value. An unrecognized option or an invalid option value cause the option to be skipped. Then, the patch adds a "sloppy" mount option that allows the parsing to succeed anyway if there were any problems during parsing. When parsing a set of options is complete, if there are errors and "sloppy" was specified, return success anyway. Otherwise, only return success if there are no errors. Signed-off-by: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
14 years ago
{ Opt_sloppy, "sloppy" },
{ Opt_soft, "soft" },
{ Opt_hard, "hard" },
{ Opt_deprecated, "intr" },
{ Opt_deprecated, "nointr" },
{ Opt_posix, "posix" },
{ Opt_noposix, "noposix" },
{ Opt_cto, "cto" },
{ Opt_nocto, "nocto" },
{ Opt_ac, "ac" },
{ Opt_noac, "noac" },
{ Opt_lock, "lock" },
{ Opt_nolock, "nolock" },
{ Opt_v2, "v2" },
{ Opt_v3, "v3" },
{ Opt_udp, "udp" },
{ Opt_tcp, "tcp" },
{ Opt_rdma, "rdma" },
{ Opt_acl, "acl" },
{ Opt_noacl, "noacl" },
{ Opt_rdirplus, "rdirplus" },
{ Opt_nordirplus, "nordirplus" },
{ Opt_sharecache, "sharecache" },
{ Opt_nosharecache, "nosharecache" },
{ Opt_port, "port=%u" },
{ Opt_rsize, "rsize=%u" },
{ Opt_wsize, "wsize=%u" },
{ Opt_bsize, "bsize=%u" },
{ Opt_timeo, "timeo=%u" },
{ Opt_retrans, "retrans=%u" },
{ Opt_acregmin, "acregmin=%u" },
{ Opt_acregmax, "acregmax=%u" },
{ Opt_acdirmin, "acdirmin=%u" },
{ Opt_acdirmax, "acdirmax=%u" },
{ Opt_actimeo, "actimeo=%u" },
{ Opt_namelen, "namlen=%u" },
{ Opt_mountport, "mountport=%u" },
{ Opt_mountvers, "mountvers=%u" },
{ Opt_nfsvers, "nfsvers=%u" },
{ Opt_nfsvers, "vers=%u" },
{ Opt_sec, "sec=%s" },
{ Opt_proto, "proto=%s" },
{ Opt_mountproto, "mountproto=%s" },
{ Opt_addr, "addr=%s" },
{ Opt_clientaddr, "clientaddr=%s" },
{ Opt_mounthost, "mounthost=%s" },
{ Opt_mountaddr, "mountaddr=%s" },
{ Opt_err, NULL }
};
enum {
Opt_xprt_udp, Opt_xprt_tcp, Opt_xprt_rdma,
Opt_xprt_err
};
static const match_table_t nfs_xprt_protocol_tokens = {
{ Opt_xprt_udp, "udp" },
{ Opt_xprt_tcp, "tcp" },
{ Opt_xprt_rdma, "rdma" },
{ Opt_xprt_err, NULL }
};
enum {
Opt_sec_none, Opt_sec_sys,
Opt_sec_krb5, Opt_sec_krb5i, Opt_sec_krb5p,
Opt_sec_lkey, Opt_sec_lkeyi, Opt_sec_lkeyp,
Opt_sec_spkm, Opt_sec_spkmi, Opt_sec_spkmp,
Opt_sec_err
};
static const match_table_t nfs_secflavor_tokens = {
{ Opt_sec_none, "none" },
{ Opt_sec_none, "null" },
{ Opt_sec_sys, "sys" },
{ Opt_sec_krb5, "krb5" },
{ Opt_sec_krb5i, "krb5i" },
{ Opt_sec_krb5p, "krb5p" },
{ Opt_sec_lkey, "lkey" },
{ Opt_sec_lkeyi, "lkeyi" },
{ Opt_sec_lkeyp, "lkeyp" },
{ Opt_sec_spkm, "spkm3" },
{ Opt_sec_spkmi, "spkm3i" },
{ Opt_sec_spkmp, "spkm3p" },
{ Opt_sec_err, NULL }
};
static void nfs_umount_begin(struct super_block *);
static int nfs_statfs(struct dentry *, struct kstatfs *);
static int nfs_show_options(struct seq_file *, struct vfsmount *);
static int nfs_show_stats(struct seq_file *, struct vfsmount *);
static int nfs_get_sb(struct file_system_type *, int, const char *, void *, struct vfsmount *);
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
static int nfs_xdev_get_sb(struct file_system_type *fs_type,
int flags, const char *dev_name, void *raw_data, struct vfsmount *mnt);
static void nfs_kill_super(struct super_block *);
static void nfs_put_super(struct super_block *);
static int nfs_remount(struct super_block *sb, int *flags, char *raw_data);
static struct file_system_type nfs_fs_type = {
.owner = THIS_MODULE,
.name = "nfs",
.get_sb = nfs_get_sb,
.kill_sb = nfs_kill_super,
.fs_flags = FS_RENAME_DOES_D_MOVE|FS_REVAL_DOT|FS_BINARY_MOUNTDATA,
};
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
struct file_system_type nfs_xdev_fs_type = {
.owner = THIS_MODULE,
.name = "nfs",
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
.get_sb = nfs_xdev_get_sb,
.kill_sb = nfs_kill_super,
.fs_flags = FS_RENAME_DOES_D_MOVE|FS_REVAL_DOT|FS_BINARY_MOUNTDATA,
};
static const struct super_operations nfs_sops = {
.alloc_inode = nfs_alloc_inode,
.destroy_inode = nfs_destroy_inode,
.write_inode = nfs_write_inode,
.put_super = nfs_put_super,
.statfs = nfs_statfs,
.clear_inode = nfs_clear_inode,
.umount_begin = nfs_umount_begin,
.show_options = nfs_show_options,
.show_stats = nfs_show_stats,
.remount_fs = nfs_remount,
};
#ifdef CONFIG_NFS_V4
static int nfs4_get_sb(struct file_system_type *fs_type,
int flags, const char *dev_name, void *raw_data, struct vfsmount *mnt);
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
static int nfs4_xdev_get_sb(struct file_system_type *fs_type,
int flags, const char *dev_name, void *raw_data, struct vfsmount *mnt);
static int nfs4_referral_get_sb(struct file_system_type *fs_type,
int flags, const char *dev_name, void *raw_data, struct vfsmount *mnt);
static void nfs4_kill_super(struct super_block *sb);
static struct file_system_type nfs4_fs_type = {
.owner = THIS_MODULE,
.name = "nfs4",
.get_sb = nfs4_get_sb,
.kill_sb = nfs4_kill_super,
.fs_flags = FS_RENAME_DOES_D_MOVE|FS_REVAL_DOT|FS_BINARY_MOUNTDATA,
};
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
struct file_system_type nfs4_xdev_fs_type = {
.owner = THIS_MODULE,
.name = "nfs4",
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
.get_sb = nfs4_xdev_get_sb,
.kill_sb = nfs4_kill_super,
.fs_flags = FS_RENAME_DOES_D_MOVE|FS_REVAL_DOT|FS_BINARY_MOUNTDATA,
};
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
struct file_system_type nfs4_referral_fs_type = {
.owner = THIS_MODULE,
.name = "nfs4",
NFS: Share NFS superblocks per-protocol per-server per-FSID The attached patch makes NFS share superblocks between mounts from the same server and FSID over the same protocol. It does this by creating each superblock with a false root and returning the real root dentry in the vfsmount presented by get_sb(). The root dentry set starts off as an anonymous dentry if we don't already have the dentry for its inode, otherwise it simply returns the dentry we already have. We may thus end up with several trees of dentries in the superblock, and if at some later point one of anonymous tree roots is discovered by normal filesystem activity to be located in another tree within the superblock, the anonymous root is named and materialises attached to the second tree at the appropriate point. Why do it this way? Why not pass an extra argument to the mount() syscall to indicate the subpath and then pathwalk from the server root to the desired directory? You can't guarantee this will work for two reasons: (1) The root and intervening nodes may not be accessible to the client. With NFS2 and NFS3, for instance, mountd is called on the server to get the filehandle for the tip of a path. mountd won't give us handles for anything we don't have permission to access, and so we can't set up NFS inodes for such nodes, and so can't easily set up dentries (we'd have to have ghost inodes or something). With this patch we don't actually create dentries until we get handles from the server that we can use to set up their inodes, and we don't actually bind them into the tree until we know for sure where they go. (2) Inaccessible symbolic links. If we're asked to mount two exports from the server, eg: mount warthog:/warthog/aaa/xxx /mmm mount warthog:/warthog/bbb/yyy /nnn We may not be able to access anything nearer the root than xxx and yyy, but we may find out later that /mmm/www/yyy, say, is actually the same directory as the one mounted on /nnn. What we might then find out, for example, is that /warthog/bbb was actually a symbolic link to /warthog/aaa/xxx/www, but we can't actually determine that by talking to the server until /warthog is made available by NFS. This would lead to having constructed an errneous dentry tree which we can't easily fix. We can end up with a dentry marked as a directory when it should actually be a symlink, or we could end up with an apparently hardlinked directory. With this patch we need not make assumptions about the type of a dentry for which we can't retrieve information, nor need we assume we know its place in the grand scheme of things until we actually see that place. This patch reduces the possibility of aliasing in the inode and page caches for inodes that may be accessed by more than one NFS export. It also reduces the number of superblocks required for NFS where there are many NFS exports being used from a server (home directory server + autofs for example). This in turn makes it simpler to do local caching of network filesystems, as it can then be guaranteed that there won't be links from multiple inodes in separate superblocks to the same cache file. Obviously, cache aliasing between different levels of NFS protocol could still be a problem, but at least that gives us another key to use when indexing the cache. This patch makes the following changes: (1) The server record construction/destruction has been abstracted out into its own set of functions to make things easier to get right. These have been moved into fs/nfs/client.c. All the code in fs/nfs/client.c has to do with the management of connections to servers, and doesn't touch superblocks in any way; the remaining code in fs/nfs/super.c has to do with VFS superblock management. (2) The sequence of events undertaken by NFS mount is now reordered: (a) A volume representation (struct nfs_server) is allocated. (b) A server representation (struct nfs_client) is acquired. This may be allocated or shared, and is keyed on server address, port and NFS version. (c) If allocated, the client representation is initialised. The state member variable of nfs_client is used to prevent a race during initialisation from two mounts. (d) For NFS4 a simple pathwalk is performed, walking from FH to FH to find the root filehandle for the mount (fs/nfs/getroot.c). For NFS2/3 we are given the root FH in advance. (e) The volume FSID is probed for on the root FH. (f) The volume representation is initialised from the FSINFO record retrieved on the root FH. (g) sget() is called to acquire a superblock. This may be allocated or shared, keyed on client pointer and FSID. (h) If allocated, the superblock is initialised. (i) If the superblock is shared, then the new nfs_server record is discarded. (j) The root dentry for this mount is looked up from the root FH. (k) The root dentry for this mount is assigned to the vfsmount. (3) nfs_readdir_lookup() creates dentries for each of the entries readdir() returns; this function now attaches disconnected trees from alternate roots that happen to be discovered attached to a directory being read (in the same way nfs_lookup() is made to do for lookup ops). The new d_materialise_unique() function is now used to do this, thus permitting the whole thing to be done under one set of locks, and thus avoiding any race between mount and lookup operations on the same directory. (4) The client management code uses a new debug facility: NFSDBG_CLIENT which is set by echoing 1024 to /proc/net/sunrpc/nfs_debug. (5) Clone mounts are now called xdev mounts. (6) Use the dentry passed to the statfs() op as the handle for retrieving fs statistics rather than the root dentry of the superblock (which is now a dummy). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
16 years ago
.get_sb = nfs4_referral_get_sb,
.kill_sb = nfs4_kill_super,
.fs_flags = FS_RENAME_DOES_D_MOVE|FS_REVAL_DOT|FS_BINARY_MOUNTDATA,
};
static const struct super_operations nfs4_sops = {
.alloc_inode = nfs_alloc_inode,
.destroy_inode = nfs_destroy_inode,
.write_inode = nfs_write_inode,
.statfs = nfs_statfs,
.clear_inode = nfs4_clear_inode,
.umount_begin = nfs_umount_begin,
.show_options = nfs_show_options,
.show_stats = nfs_show_stats,
.remount_fs = nfs_remount,
};
#endif
static struct shrinker acl_shrinker = {
.shrink = nfs_access_cache_shrinker,
.seeks = DEFAULT_SEEKS,
};
/*
* Register the NFS filesystems
*/
int __init register_nfs_fs(void)
{
int ret;
ret = register_filesystem(&nfs_fs_type);
if (ret < 0)
goto error_0;
ret = nfs_register_sysctl();
if (ret < 0)
goto error_1;
#ifdef CONFIG_NFS_V4
ret = register_filesystem(&nfs4_fs_type);
if (ret < 0)
goto error_2;
#endif
register_shrinker(&acl_shrinker);
return 0;
#ifdef CONFIG_NFS_V4
error_2:
nfs_unregister_sysctl();
#endif
error_1:
unregister_filesystem(&nfs_fs_type);
error_0:
return ret;
}
/*
* Unregister the NFS filesystems
*/
void __exit unregister_nfs_fs(void)
{
unregister_shrinker(&acl_shrinker);
#ifdef CONFIG_NFS_V4
unregister_filesystem(&nfs4_fs_type);
#endif
nfs: fix oops re sysctls and V4 support NFS unregisters sysctls only if V4 support is compiled in. However, sysctl table is not V4 specific, so unregister it always. Steps to reproduce: [build nfs.ko with CONFIG_NFS_V4=n] modrobe nfs rmmod nfs ls /proc/sys Unable to handle kernel paging request at ffffffff880661c0 RIP: [<ffffffff802af8e3>] proc_sys_readdir+0xd3/0x350 PGD 203067 PUD 207063 PMD 7e216067 PTE 0 Oops: 0000 [1] SMP CPU 1 Modules linked in: lockd nfs_acl sunrpc Pid: 3335, comm: ls Not tainted 2.6.23-rc3-bloat #2 RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff802af8e3>] [<ffffffff802af8e3>] proc_sys_readdir+0xd3/0x350 RSP: 0018:ffff81007fd93e78 EFLAGS: 00010286 RAX: ffffffff880661c0 RBX: ffffffff80466370 RCX: ffffffff880661c0 RDX: 00000000000014c0 RSI: ffff81007f3ad020 RDI: ffff81007efd8b40 RBP: 0000000000000018 R08: 0000000000000000 R09: 0000000000000000 R10: 0000000000000001 R11: ffffffff802a8570 R12: ffffffff880661c0 R13: ffff81007e219640 R14: ffff81007efd8b40 R15: ffff81007ded7280 FS: 00002ba25ef03060(0000) GS:ffff81007ff81258(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000 CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 000000008005003b CR2: ffffffff880661c0 CR3: 000000007dfaf000 CR4: 00000000000006e0 DR0: 0000000000000000 DR1: 0000000000000000 DR2: 0000000000000000 DR3: 0000000000000000 DR6: 00000000ffff0ff0 DR7: 0000000000000400 Process ls (pid: 3335, threadinfo ffff81007fd92000, task ffff81007d8a0000) Stack: ffff81007f3ad150 ffffffff80283f30 ffff81007fd93f48 ffff81007efd8b40 ffff81007ee00440 0000000422222222 0000000200035593 ffffffff88037e9a 2222222222222222 ffffffff80466500 ffff81007e416400 ffff81007e219640 Call Trace: [<ffffffff80283f30>] filldir+0x0/0xf0 [<ffffffff80283f30>] filldir+0x0/0xf0 [<ffffffff802840c7>] vfs_readdir+0xa7/0xc0 [<ffffffff80284376>] sys_getdents+0x96/0xe0 [<ffffffff8020bb3e>] system_call+0x7e/0x83 Code: 41 8b 14 24 85 d2 74 dc 49 8b 44 24 08 48 85 c0 74 e7 49 3b RIP [<ffffffff802af8e3>] proc_sys_readdir+0xd3/0x350 RSP <ffff81007fd93e78> CR2: ffffffff880661c0 Kernel panic - not syncing: Fatal exception Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Acked-by: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: "J. Bruce Fields" <bfields@fieldses.org> Cc: <stable@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
nfs_unregister_sysctl();
unregister_filesystem(&nfs_fs_type);
}
void nfs_sb_active(struct nfs_server *server)
{
atomic_inc(&server->active);
}
void nfs_sb_deactive(struct nfs_server *server)
{
if (atomic_dec_and_test(&server->active))
wake_up(&server->active_wq);
}
static void nfs_put_super(struct super_block *sb)
{
struct nfs_server *server = NFS_SB(sb);
/*
* Make sure there are no outstanding ops to this server.
* If so, wait for them to finish before allowing the
* unmount to continue.
*/
wait_event(server->active_wq, atomic_read(&server->active) == 0);
}
/*
* Deliver file system statistics to userspace
*/
static int nfs_statfs(struct dentry *dentry, struct kstatfs *buf)
{
struct nfs_server *server = NFS_SB(dentry->d_sb);
unsigned char blockbits;
unsigned long blockres;
struct nfs_fh *fh = NFS_FH(dentry->d_inode);
struct nfs_fattr fattr;
struct nfs_fsstat res = {
.fattr = &fattr,
};
int error;
error = server->nfs_client->rpc_ops->statfs(server, fh, &res);
if (error < 0)
goto out_err;
buf->f_type = NFS_SUPER_MAGIC;
/*
* Current versions of glibc do not correctly handle the
* case where f_frsize != f_bsize. Eventually we want to
* report the value of wtmult in this field.
*/
buf->f_frsize = dentry->d_sb->s_blocksize;
/*
* On most *nix systems, f_blocks, f_bfree, and f_bavail
* are reported in units of f_frsize. Linux hasn't had
* an f_frsize field in its statfs struct until recently,
* thus historically Linux's sys_statfs reports these
* fields in units of f_bsize.
*/
buf->f_bsize = dentry->d_sb->s_blocksize;
blockbits = dentry->d_sb->s_blocksize_bits;
blockres = (1 << blockbits) - 1;
buf->f_blocks = (res.tbytes + blockres) >> blockbits;
buf->f_bfree = (res.fbytes + blockres) >> blockbits;
buf->f_bavail = (res.abytes + blockres) >> blockbits;
buf->f_files = res.tfiles;
buf->f_ffree = res.afiles;
buf->f_namelen = server->namelen;
return 0;
out_err:
dprintk("%s: statfs error = %d\n", __func__, -error);
return error;
}
/*
* Map the security flavour number to a name
*/
static const char *nfs_pseudoflavour_to_name(rpc_authflavor_t flavour)
{
static const struct {
rpc_authflavor_t flavour;
const char *str;
} sec_flavours[] = {
{ RPC_AUTH_NULL, "null" },
{ RPC_AUTH_UNIX, "sys" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_KRB5, "krb5" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_KRB5I, "krb5i" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_KRB5P, "krb5p" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_LKEY, "lkey" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_LKEYI, "lkeyi" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_LKEYP, "lkeyp" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_SPKM, "spkm" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_SPKMI, "spkmi" },
{ RPC_AUTH_GSS_SPKMP, "spkmp" },
{ UINT_MAX, "unknown" }
};
int i;
for (i = 0; sec_flavours[i].flavour != UINT_MAX; i++) {
if (sec_flavours[i].flavour == flavour)
break;
}
return sec_flavours[i].str;
}
static void nfs_show_mountd_options(struct seq_file *m, struct nfs_server *nfss,
int showdefaults)
{
struct sockaddr *sap = (struct sockaddr *)&nfss->mountd_address;
switch (sap->sa_family) {
case AF_INET: {
struct sockaddr_in *sin = (struct sockaddr_in *)sap;
seq_printf(m, ",mountaddr=" NIPQUAD_FMT,
NIPQUAD(sin->sin_addr.s_addr));
break;
}
case AF_INET6: {
struct sockaddr_in6 *sin6 = (struct sockaddr_in6 *)sap;
seq_printf(m, ",mountaddr=" NIP6_FMT,
NIP6(sin6->sin6_addr));
break;
}
default:
if (showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",mountaddr=unspecified");
}
if (nfss->mountd_version || showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",mountvers=%u", nfss->mountd_version);
if (nfss->mountd_port || showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",mountport=%u", nfss->mountd_port);
switch (nfss->mountd_protocol) {
case IPPROTO_UDP:
seq_printf(m, ",mountproto=udp");
break;
case IPPROTO_TCP:
seq_printf(m, ",mountproto=tcp");
break;
default:
if (showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",mountproto=auto");
}
}
/*
* Describe the mount options in force on this server representation
*/
static void nfs_show_mount_options(struct seq_file *m, struct nfs_server *nfss,
int showdefaults)
{
static const struct proc_nfs_info {
int flag;
const char *str;
const char *nostr;
} nfs_info[] = {
{ NFS_MOUNT_SOFT, ",soft", ",hard" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_INTR, ",intr", ",nointr" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_POSIX, ",posix", "" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_NOCTO, ",nocto", "" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_NOAC, ",noac", "" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_NONLM, ",nolock", "" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_NOACL, ",noacl", "" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_NORDIRPLUS, ",nordirplus", "" },
{ NFS_MOUNT_UNSHARED, ",nosharecache", ""},
{ 0, NULL, NULL }
};
const struct proc_nfs_info *nfs_infop;
struct nfs_client *clp = nfss->nfs_client;
u32 version = clp->rpc_ops->version;
seq_printf(m, ",vers=%u", version);
seq_printf(m, ",rsize=%u", nfss->rsize);
seq_printf(m, ",wsize=%u", nfss->wsize);
if (nfss->bsize != 0)
seq_printf(m, ",bsize=%u", nfss->bsize);
seq_printf(m, ",namlen=%u", nfss->namelen);
if (nfss->acregmin != NFS_DEF_ACREGMIN*HZ || showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",acregmin=%u", nfss->acregmin/HZ);
if (nfss->acregmax != NFS_DEF_ACREGMAX*HZ || showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",acregmax=%u", nfss->acregmax/HZ);
if (nfss->acdirmin != NFS_DEF_ACDIRMIN*HZ || showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",acdirmin=%u", nfss->acdirmin/HZ);
if (nfss->acdirmax != NFS_DEF_ACDIRMAX*HZ || showdefaults)
seq_printf(m, ",acdirmax=%u", nfss->acdirmax/HZ);
for (nfs_infop = nfs_info; nfs_infop->flag; nfs_infop++) {
if (nfss->flags & nfs_infop->flag)
seq_puts(m, nfs_infop->str);
else