original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
You can not select more than 25 topics Topics must start with a letter or number, can include dashes ('-') and can be up to 35 characters long.

1397 lines
44 KiB

config ARCH
string
option env="ARCH"
config KERNELVERSION
string
option env="KERNELVERSION"
config DEFCONFIG_LIST
string
[PATCH] uml: use DEFCONFIG_LIST to avoid reading host's config This should make sure that, for UML, host's configuration files are not considered, which avoids various pains to the user. Our dependency are such that the obtained Kconfig will be valid and will lead to successful compilation - however they cannot prevent an user from disabling any boot device, and if an option is not set in the read .config (say /boot/config-XXX), with make menuconfig ARCH=um, it is not set. This always disables UBD and all console I/O channels, which leads to non-working UML kernels, so this bothers users - especially now, since it will happen on almost every machine (/boot/config-`uname -r` exists almost on every machine). It can be workarounded with make defconfig ARCH=um, but it is non-obvious and can be avoided, so please _do_ merge this patch. Given the existence of options, it could be interesting to implement (additionally) "option required" - with it, Kconfig will refuse reading a .config file (from wherever it comes) if the given option is not set. With this, one could mark with it the option characteristic of the given architecture (it was an old proposal of Roman Zippel, when I pointed out our problem): config UML option required default y However this should be further discussed: *) for x86, it must support constructs like: ==arch/i386/Kconfig== config 64BIT option required default n where Kconfig must require that CONFIG_64BIT is disabled or not present in the read .config. *) do we want to do such checks only for the starting defconfig or also for .config? Which leads to: *) I may want to port a x86_64 .config to x86 and viceversa, or even among more different archs. Should that be allowed, and in which measure (the user may force skipping the check for a .config or it is only given a warning by default)? Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org> Cc: <kbuild-devel@lists.sourceforge.net> Signed-off-by: Paolo 'Blaisorblade' Giarrusso <blaisorblade@yahoo.it> Cc: Jeff Dike <jdike@addtoit.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
depends on !UML
option defconfig_list
default "/lib/modules/$UNAME_RELEASE/.config"
default "/etc/kernel-config"
default "/boot/config-$UNAME_RELEASE"
default "$ARCH_DEFCONFIG"
default "arch/$ARCH/defconfig"
config CONSTRUCTORS
bool
depends on !UML
default y
config HAVE_IRQ_WORK
bool
config IRQ_WORK
bool
depends on HAVE_IRQ_WORK
menu "General setup"
config EXPERIMENTAL
bool "Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers"
---help---
Some of the various things that Linux supports (such as network
drivers, file systems, network protocols, etc.) can be in a state
of development where the functionality, stability, or the level of
testing is not yet high enough for general use. This is usually
known as the "alpha-test" phase among developers. If a feature is
currently in alpha-test, then the developers usually discourage
uninformed widespread use of this feature by the general public to
avoid "Why doesn't this work?" type mail messages. However, active
testing and use of these systems is welcomed. Just be aware that it
may not meet the normal level of reliability or it may fail to work
in some special cases. Detailed bug reports from people familiar
with the kernel internals are usually welcomed by the developers
(before submitting bug reports, please read the documents
<file:README>, <file:MAINTAINERS>, <file:REPORTING-BUGS>,
<file:Documentation/BUG-HUNTING>, and
<file:Documentation/oops-tracing.txt> in the kernel source).
This option will also make obsoleted drivers available. These are
drivers that have been replaced by something else, and/or are
scheduled to be removed in a future kernel release.
Unless you intend to help test and develop a feature or driver that
falls into this category, or you have a situation that requires
using these features, you should probably say N here, which will
cause the configurator to present you with fewer choices. If
you say Y here, you will be offered the choice of using features or
drivers that are currently considered to be in the alpha-test phase.
config BROKEN
bool
config BROKEN_ON_SMP
bool
depends on BROKEN || !SMP
default y
config LOCK_KERNEL
bool
depends on (SMP || PREEMPT) && BKL
default y
config INIT_ENV_ARG_LIMIT
int
default 32 if !UML
default 128 if UML
help
Maximum of each of the number of arguments and environment
variables passed to init from the kernel command line.
config CROSS_COMPILE
string "Cross-compiler tool prefix"
help
Same as running 'make CROSS_COMPILE=prefix-' but stored for
default make runs in this kernel build directory. You don't
need to set this unless you want the configured kernel build
directory to select the cross-compiler automatically.
config LOCALVERSION
string "Local version - append to kernel release"
help
Append an extra string to the end of your kernel version.
This will show up when you type uname, for example.
The string you set here will be appended after the contents of
any files with a filename matching localversion* in your
object and source tree, in that order. Your total string can
be a maximum of 64 characters.
config LOCALVERSION_AUTO
bool "Automatically append version information to the version string"
default y
help
This will try to automatically determine if the current tree is a
release tree by looking for git tags that belong to the current
top of tree revision.
A string of the format -gxxxxxxxx will be added to the localversion
if a git-based tree is found. The string generated by this will be
appended after any matching localversion* files, and after the value
set in CONFIG_LOCALVERSION.
(The actual string used here is the first eight characters produced
by running the command:
$ git rev-parse --verify HEAD
which is done within the script "scripts/setlocalversion".)
config HAVE_KERNEL_GZIP
bool
config HAVE_KERNEL_BZIP2
bool
config HAVE_KERNEL_LZMA
bool
config HAVE_KERNEL_XZ
bool
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
config HAVE_KERNEL_LZO
bool
choice
prompt "Kernel compression mode"
default KERNEL_GZIP
depends on HAVE_KERNEL_GZIP || HAVE_KERNEL_BZIP2 || HAVE_KERNEL_LZMA || HAVE_KERNEL_XZ || HAVE_KERNEL_LZO
help
The linux kernel is a kind of self-extracting executable.
Several compression algorithms are available, which differ
in efficiency, compression and decompression speed.
Compression speed is only relevant when building a kernel.
Decompression speed is relevant at each boot.
If you have any problems with bzip2 or lzma compressed
kernels, mail me (Alain Knaff) <alain@knaff.lu>. (An older
version of this functionality (bzip2 only), for 2.4, was
supplied by Christian Ludwig)
High compression options are mostly useful for users, who
are low on disk space (embedded systems), but for whom ram
size matters less.
If in doubt, select 'gzip'
config KERNEL_GZIP
bool "Gzip"
depends on HAVE_KERNEL_GZIP
help
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
The old and tried gzip compression. It provides a good balance
between compression ratio and decompression speed.
config KERNEL_BZIP2
bool "Bzip2"
depends on HAVE_KERNEL_BZIP2
help
Its compression ratio and speed is intermediate.
Decompression speed is slowest among the three. The kernel
size is about 10% smaller with bzip2, in comparison to gzip.
Bzip2 uses a large amount of memory. For modern kernels you
will need at least 8MB RAM or more for booting.
config KERNEL_LZMA
bool "LZMA"
depends on HAVE_KERNEL_LZMA
help
The most recent compression algorithm.
Its ratio is best, decompression speed is between the other
two. Compression is slowest. The kernel size is about 33%
smaller with LZMA in comparison to gzip.
config KERNEL_XZ
bool "XZ"
depends on HAVE_KERNEL_XZ
help
XZ uses the LZMA2 algorithm and instruction set specific
BCJ filters which can improve compression ratio of executable
code. The size of the kernel is about 30% smaller with XZ in
comparison to gzip. On architectures for which there is a BCJ
filter (i386, x86_64, ARM, IA-64, PowerPC, and SPARC), XZ
will create a few percent smaller kernel than plain LZMA.
The speed is about the same as with LZMA: The decompression
speed of XZ is better than that of bzip2 but worse than gzip
and LZO. Compression is slow.
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
config KERNEL_LZO
bool "LZO"
depends on HAVE_KERNEL_LZO
help
Its compression ratio is the poorest among the 4. The kernel
size is about 10% bigger than gzip; however its speed
lib: add support for LZO-compressed kernels This patch series adds generic support for creating and extracting LZO-compressed kernel images, as well as support for using such images on the x86 and ARM architectures, and support for creating and using LZO-compressed initrd and initramfs images. Russell King said: : Testing on a Cortex A9 model: : - lzo decompressor is 65% of the time gzip takes to decompress a kernel : - lzo kernel is 9% larger than a gzip kernel : : which I'm happy to say confirms your figures when comparing the two. : : However, when comparing your new gzip code to the old gzip code: : - new is 99% of the size of the old code : - new takes 42% of the time to decompress than the old code : : What this means is that for a proper comparison, the results get even better: : - lzo is 7.5% larger than the old gzip'd kernel image : - lzo takes 28% of the time that the old gzip code took : : So the expense seems definitely worth the effort. The only reason I : can think of ever using gzip would be if you needed the additional : compression (eg, because you have limited flash to store the image.) : : I would argue that the default for ARM should therefore be LZO. This patch: The lzo compressor is worse than gzip at compression, but faster at extraction. Here are some figures for an ARM board I'm working on: Uncompressed size: 3.24Mo gzip 1.61Mo 0.72s lzo 1.75Mo 0.48s So for a compression ratio that is still relatively close to gzip, it's much faster to extract, at least in that case. This part contains: - Makefile routine to support lzo compression - Fixes to the existing lzo compressor so that it can be used in compressed kernels - wrapper around the existing lzo1x_decompress, as it only extracts one block at a time, while we need to extract a whole file here - config dialog for kernel compression [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: cleanup] Signed-off-by: Albin Tonnerre <albin.tonnerre@free-electrons.com> Tested-by: Wu Zhangjin <wuzhangjin@gmail.com> Acked-by: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Tested-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
(both compression and decompression) is the fastest.
endchoice
config SWAP
bool "Support for paging of anonymous memory (swap)"
[PATCH] BLOCK: Make it possible to disable the block layer [try #6] Make it possible to disable the block layer. Not all embedded devices require it, some can make do with just JFFS2, NFS, ramfs, etc - none of which require the block layer to be present. This patch does the following: (*) Introduces CONFIG_BLOCK to disable the block layer, buffering and blockdev support. (*) Adds dependencies on CONFIG_BLOCK to any configuration item that controls an item that uses the block layer. This includes: (*) Block I/O tracing. (*) Disk partition code. (*) All filesystems that are block based, eg: Ext3, ReiserFS, ISOFS. (*) The SCSI layer. As far as I can tell, even SCSI chardevs use the block layer to do scheduling. Some drivers that use SCSI facilities - such as USB storage - end up disabled indirectly from this. (*) Various block-based device drivers, such as IDE and the old CDROM drivers. (*) MTD blockdev handling and FTL. (*) JFFS - which uses set_bdev_super(), something it could avoid doing by taking a leaf out of JFFS2's book. (*) Makes most of the contents of linux/blkdev.h, linux/buffer_head.h and linux/elevator.h contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK being set. sector_div() is, however, still used in places, and so is still available. (*) Also made contingent are the contents of linux/mpage.h, linux/genhd.h and parts of linux/fs.h. (*) Makes a number of files in fs/ contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) Makes mm/bounce.c (bounce buffering) contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) set_page_dirty() doesn't call __set_page_dirty_buffers() if CONFIG_BLOCK is not enabled. (*) fs/no-block.c is created to hold out-of-line stubs and things that are required when CONFIG_BLOCK is not set: (*) Default blockdev file operations (to give error ENODEV on opening). (*) Makes some /proc changes: (*) /proc/devices does not list any blockdevs. (*) /proc/diskstats and /proc/partitions are contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) Makes some compat ioctl handling contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK. (*) If CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined, makes sys_quotactl() return -ENODEV if given command other than Q_SYNC or if a special device is specified. (*) In init/do_mounts.c, no reference is made to the blockdev routines if CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined. This does not prohibit NFS roots or JFFS2. (*) The bdflush, ioprio_set and ioprio_get syscalls can now be absent (return error ENOSYS by way of cond_syscall if so). (*) The seclvl_bd_claim() and seclvl_bd_release() security calls do nothing if CONFIG_BLOCK is not set, since they can't then happen. Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
16 years ago
depends on MMU && BLOCK
default y
help
This option allows you to choose whether you want to have support
for so called swap devices or swap files in your kernel that are
used to provide more virtual memory than the actual RAM present
in your computer. If unsure say Y.
config SYSVIPC
bool "System V IPC"
---help---
Inter Process Communication is a suite of library functions and
system calls which let processes (running programs) synchronize and
exchange information. It is generally considered to be a good thing,
and some programs won't run unless you say Y here. In particular, if
you want to run the DOS emulator dosemu under Linux (read the
DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>),
you'll need to say Y here.
You can find documentation about IPC with "info ipc" and also in
section 6.4 of the Linux Programmer's Guide, available from
<http://www.tldp.org/guides.html>.
config SYSVIPC_SYSCTL
bool
depends on SYSVIPC
depends on SYSCTL
default y
config POSIX_MQUEUE
bool "POSIX Message Queues"
depends on NET && EXPERIMENTAL
---help---
POSIX variant of message queues is a part of IPC. In POSIX message
queues every message has a priority which decides about succession
of receiving it by a process. If you want to compile and run
programs written e.g. for Solaris with use of its POSIX message
queues (functions mq_*) say Y here.
POSIX message queues are visible as a filesystem called 'mqueue'
and can be mounted somewhere if you want to do filesystem
operations on message queues.
If unsure, say Y.
config POSIX_MQUEUE_SYSCTL
bool
depends on POSIX_MQUEUE
depends on SYSCTL
default y
config BSD_PROCESS_ACCT
bool "BSD Process Accounting"
help
If you say Y here, a user level program will be able to instruct the
kernel (via a special system call) to write process accounting
information to a file: whenever a process exits, information about
that process will be appended to the file by the kernel. The
information includes things such as creation time, owning user,
command name, memory usage, controlling terminal etc. (the complete
list is in the struct acct in <file:include/linux/acct.h>). It is
up to the user level program to do useful things with this
information. This is generally a good idea, so say Y.
config BSD_PROCESS_ACCT_V3
bool "BSD Process Accounting version 3 file format"
depends on BSD_PROCESS_ACCT
default n
help
If you say Y here, the process accounting information is written
in a new file format that also logs the process IDs of each
process and it's parent. Note that this file format is incompatible
with previous v0/v1/v2 file formats, so you will need updated tools
for processing it. A preliminary version of these tools is available
at <http://www.gnu.org/software/acct/>.
config FHANDLE
bool "open by fhandle syscalls"
select EXPORTFS
help
If you say Y here, a user level program will be able to map
file names to handle and then later use the handle for
different file system operations. This is useful in implementing
userspace file servers, which now track files using handles instead
of names. The handle would remain the same even if file names
get renamed. Enables open_by_handle_at(2) and name_to_handle_at(2)
syscalls.
config TASKSTATS
bool "Export task/process statistics through netlink (EXPERIMENTAL)"
depends on NET
default n
help
Export selected statistics for tasks/processes through the
generic netlink interface. Unlike BSD process accounting, the
statistics are available during the lifetime of tasks/processes as
responses to commands. Like BSD accounting, they are sent to user
space on task exit.
Say N if unsure.
config TASK_DELAY_ACCT
bool "Enable per-task delay accounting (EXPERIMENTAL)"
depends on TASKSTATS
help
Collect information on time spent by a task waiting for system
resources like cpu, synchronous block I/O completion and swapping
in pages. Such statistics can help in setting a task's priorities
relative to other tasks for cpu, io, rss limits etc.
Say N if unsure.
config TASK_XACCT
bool "Enable extended accounting over taskstats (EXPERIMENTAL)"
depends on TASKSTATS
help
Collect extended task accounting data and send the data
to userland for processing over the taskstats interface.
Say N if unsure.
config TASK_IO_ACCOUNTING
bool "Enable per-task storage I/O accounting (EXPERIMENTAL)"
depends on TASK_XACCT
help
Collect information on the number of bytes of storage I/O which this
task has caused.
Say N if unsure.
config AUDIT
bool "Auditing support"
depends on NET
help
Enable auditing infrastructure that can be used with another
kernel subsystem, such as SELinux (which requires this for
logging of avc messages output). Does not do system-call
auditing without CONFIG_AUDITSYSCALL.
config AUDITSYSCALL
bool "Enable system-call auditing support"
depends on AUDIT && (X86 || PPC || S390 || IA64 || UML || SPARC64 || SUPERH)
default y if SECURITY_SELINUX
help
Enable low-overhead system-call auditing infrastructure that
can be used independently or with another kernel subsystem,
such as SELinux.
config AUDIT_WATCH
def_bool y
depends on AUDITSYSCALL
select FSNOTIFY
config AUDIT_TREE
def_bool y
depends on AUDITSYSCALL
select FSNOTIFY
source "kernel/irq/Kconfig"
menu "RCU Subsystem"
choice
prompt "RCU Implementation"
default TREE_RCU
config TREE_RCU
bool "Tree-based hierarchical RCU"
depends on !PREEMPT && SMP
help
This option selects the RCU implementation that is
designed for very large SMP system with hundreds or
thousands of CPUs. It also scales down nicely to
smaller systems.
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
config TREE_PREEMPT_RCU
rcu: Add a TINY_PREEMPT_RCU Implement a small-memory-footprint uniprocessor-only implementation of preemptible RCU. This implementation uses but a single blocked-tasks list rather than the combinatorial number used per leaf rcu_node by TREE_PREEMPT_RCU, which reduces memory consumption and greatly simplifies processing. This version also takes advantage of uniprocessor execution to accelerate grace periods in the case where there are no readers. The general design is otherwise broadly similar to that of TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. This implementation is a step towards having RCU implementation driven off of the SMP and PREEMPT kernel configuration variables, which can happen once this implementation has accumulated sufficient experience. Removed ACCESS_ONCE() from __rcu_read_unlock() and added barrier() as suggested by Steve Rostedt in order to avoid the compiler-reordering issue noted by Mathieu Desnoyers (http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/8/16/183). As can be seen below, CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU represents almost 5Kbyte savings compared to CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. Of course, for non-real-time workloads, CONFIG_TINY_RCU is even better. CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 6170 825 28 7023 kernel/rcutree.o ---- 7026 Total CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 2081 81 8 2170 kernel/rcutiny.o ---- 2183 Total CONFIG_TINY_RCU (non-preemptible) text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 719 25 0 744 kernel/rcutiny.o --- 757 Total Requested-by: Loïc Minier <loic.minier@canonical.com> Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
12 years ago
bool "Preemptible tree-based hierarchical RCU"
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
depends on PREEMPT
help
This option selects the RCU implementation that is
designed for very large SMP systems with hundreds or
thousands of CPUs, but for which real-time response
is also required. It also scales down nicely to
smaller systems.
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
rcu: "Tiny RCU", The Bloatwatch Edition This patch is a version of RCU designed for !SMP provided for a small-footprint RCU implementation. In particular, the implementation of synchronize_rcu() is extremely lightweight and high performance. It passes rcutorture testing in each of the four relevant configurations (combinations of NO_HZ and PREEMPT) on x86. This saves about 1K bytes compared to old Classic RCU (which is no longer in mainline), and more than three kilobytes compared to Hierarchical RCU (updated to 2.6.30): CONFIG_TREE_RCU: text data bss dec filename 183 4 0 187 kernel/rcupdate.o 2783 520 36 3339 kernel/rcutree.o 3526 Total (vs 4565 for v7) CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU: text data bss dec filename 263 4 0 267 kernel/rcupdate.o 4594 776 52 5422 kernel/rcutree.o 5689 Total (6155 for v7) CONFIG_TINY_RCU: text data bss dec filename 96 4 0 100 kernel/rcupdate.o 734 24 0 758 kernel/rcutiny.o 858 Total (vs 848 for v7) The above is for x86. Your mileage may vary on other platforms. Further compression is possible, but is being procrastinated. Changes from v7 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/10/9/388) o Apply Lai Jiangshan's review comments (aside from might_sleep() in synchronize_sched(), which is covered by SMP builds). o Fix up expedited primitives. Changes from v6 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/9/23/293). o Forward ported to put it into the 2.6.33 stream. o Added lockdep support. o Make lightweight rcu_barrier. Changes from v5 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/6/23/12). o Ported to latest pre-2.6.32 merge window kernel. - Renamed rcu_qsctr_inc() to rcu_sched_qs(). - Renamed rcu_bh_qsctr_inc() to rcu_bh_qs(). - Provided trivial rcu_cpu_notify(). - Provided trivial exit_rcu(). - Provided trivial rcu_needs_cpu(). - Fixed up the rcu_*_enter/exit() functions in linux/hardirq.h. o Removed the dependence on EMBEDDED, with a view to making TINY_RCU default for !SMP at some time in the future. o Added (trivial) support for expedited grace periods. Changes from v4 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/5/2/91) include: o Squeeze the size down a bit further by removing the ->completed field from struct rcu_ctrlblk. o This permits synchronize_rcu() to become the empty function. Previous concerns about rcutorture were unfounded, as rcutorture correctly handles a constant value from rcu_batches_completed() and rcu_batches_completed_bh(). Changes from v3 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/3/29/221) include: o Changed rcu_batches_completed(), rcu_batches_completed_bh() rcu_enter_nohz(), rcu_exit_nohz(), rcu_nmi_enter(), and rcu_nmi_exit(), to be static inlines, as suggested by David Howells. Doing this saves about 100 bytes from rcutiny.o. (The numbers between v3 and this v4 of the patch are not directly comparable, since they are against different versions of Linux.) Changes from v2 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/2/3/333) include: o Fix whitespace issues. o Change short-circuit "||" operator to instead be "+" in order to fix performance bug noted by "kraai" on LWN. (http://lwn.net/Articles/324348/) Changes from v1 (http://lkml.org/lkml/2009/1/13/440) include: o This version depends on EMBEDDED as well as !SMP, as suggested by Ingo. o Updated rcu_needs_cpu() to unconditionally return zero, permitting the CPU to enter dynticks-idle mode at any time. This works because callbacks can be invoked upon entry to dynticks-idle mode. o Paul is now OK with this being included, based on a poll at the Kernel Miniconf at linux.conf.au, where about ten people said that they cared about saving 900 bytes on single-CPU systems. o Applies to both mainline and tip/core/rcu. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: Josh Triplett <josh@joshtriplett.org> Reviewed-by: Lai Jiangshan <laijs@cn.fujitsu.com> Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org Cc: Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu Cc: avi@redhat.com Cc: mtosatti@redhat.com LKML-Reference: <12565226351355-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
config TINY_RCU
bool "UP-only small-memory-footprint RCU"
depends on !SMP
help
This option selects the RCU implementation that is
designed for UP systems from which real-time response
is not required. This option greatly reduces the
memory footprint of RCU.
rcu: Add a TINY_PREEMPT_RCU Implement a small-memory-footprint uniprocessor-only implementation of preemptible RCU. This implementation uses but a single blocked-tasks list rather than the combinatorial number used per leaf rcu_node by TREE_PREEMPT_RCU, which reduces memory consumption and greatly simplifies processing. This version also takes advantage of uniprocessor execution to accelerate grace periods in the case where there are no readers. The general design is otherwise broadly similar to that of TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. This implementation is a step towards having RCU implementation driven off of the SMP and PREEMPT kernel configuration variables, which can happen once this implementation has accumulated sufficient experience. Removed ACCESS_ONCE() from __rcu_read_unlock() and added barrier() as suggested by Steve Rostedt in order to avoid the compiler-reordering issue noted by Mathieu Desnoyers (http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/8/16/183). As can be seen below, CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU represents almost 5Kbyte savings compared to CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. Of course, for non-real-time workloads, CONFIG_TINY_RCU is even better. CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 6170 825 28 7023 kernel/rcutree.o ---- 7026 Total CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 2081 81 8 2170 kernel/rcutiny.o ---- 2183 Total CONFIG_TINY_RCU (non-preemptible) text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 719 25 0 744 kernel/rcutiny.o --- 757 Total Requested-by: Loïc Minier <loic.minier@canonical.com> Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
12 years ago
config TINY_PREEMPT_RCU
bool "Preemptible UP-only small-memory-footprint RCU"
depends on !SMP && PREEMPT
help
This option selects the RCU implementation that is designed
for real-time UP systems. This option greatly reduces the
memory footprint of RCU.
endchoice
rcu: Add a TINY_PREEMPT_RCU Implement a small-memory-footprint uniprocessor-only implementation of preemptible RCU. This implementation uses but a single blocked-tasks list rather than the combinatorial number used per leaf rcu_node by TREE_PREEMPT_RCU, which reduces memory consumption and greatly simplifies processing. This version also takes advantage of uniprocessor execution to accelerate grace periods in the case where there are no readers. The general design is otherwise broadly similar to that of TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. This implementation is a step towards having RCU implementation driven off of the SMP and PREEMPT kernel configuration variables, which can happen once this implementation has accumulated sufficient experience. Removed ACCESS_ONCE() from __rcu_read_unlock() and added barrier() as suggested by Steve Rostedt in order to avoid the compiler-reordering issue noted by Mathieu Desnoyers (http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/8/16/183). As can be seen below, CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU represents almost 5Kbyte savings compared to CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU. Of course, for non-real-time workloads, CONFIG_TINY_RCU is even better. CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 6170 825 28 7023 kernel/rcutree.o ---- 7026 Total CONFIG_TINY_PREEMPT_RCU text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 2081 81 8 2170 kernel/rcutiny.o ---- 2183 Total CONFIG_TINY_RCU (non-preemptible) text data bss dec filename 13 0 0 13 kernel/rcupdate.o 719 25 0 744 kernel/rcutiny.o --- 757 Total Requested-by: Loïc Minier <loic.minier@canonical.com> Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
12 years ago
config PREEMPT_RCU
def_bool ( TREE_PREEMPT_RCU || TINY_PREEMPT_RCU )
help
This option enables preemptible-RCU code that is common between
the TREE_PREEMPT_RCU and TINY_PREEMPT_RCU implementations.
config RCU_TRACE
bool "Enable tracing for RCU"
help
This option provides tracing in RCU which presents stats
in debugfs for debugging RCU implementation.
Say Y here if you want to enable RCU tracing
Say N if you are unsure.
config RCU_FANOUT
int "Tree-based hierarchical RCU fanout value"
range 2 64 if 64BIT
range 2 32 if !64BIT
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
depends on TREE_RCU || TREE_PREEMPT_RCU
default 64 if 64BIT
default 32 if !64BIT
help
This option controls the fanout of hierarchical implementations
of RCU, allowing RCU to work efficiently on machines with
large numbers of CPUs. This value must be at least the fourth
root of NR_CPUS, which allows NR_CPUS to be insanely large.
The default value of RCU_FANOUT should be used for production
systems, but if you are stress-testing the RCU implementation
itself, small RCU_FANOUT values allow you to test large-system
code paths on small(er) systems.
Select a specific number if testing RCU itself.
Take the default if unsure.
config RCU_FANOUT_EXACT
bool "Disable tree-based hierarchical RCU auto-balancing"
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
depends on TREE_RCU || TREE_PREEMPT_RCU
default n
help
This option forces use of the exact RCU_FANOUT value specified,
regardless of imbalances in the hierarchy. This is useful for
testing RCU itself, and might one day be useful on systems with
strong NUMA behavior.
Without RCU_FANOUT_EXACT, the code will balance the hierarchy.
Say N if unsure.
rcu: Accelerate grace period if last non-dynticked CPU Currently, rcu_needs_cpu() simply checks whether the current CPU has an outstanding RCU callback, which means that the last CPU to go into dyntick-idle mode might wait a few ticks for the relevant grace periods to complete. However, if all the other CPUs are in dyntick-idle mode, and if this CPU is in a quiescent state (which it is for RCU-bh and RCU-sched any time that we are considering going into dyntick-idle mode), then the grace period is instantly complete. This patch therefore repeatedly invokes the RCU grace-period machinery in order to force any needed grace periods to complete quickly. It does so a limited number of times in order to prevent starvation by an RCU callback function that might pass itself to call_rcu(). However, if any CPU other than the current one is not in dyntick-idle mode, fall back to simply checking (with fix to bug noted by Lai Jiangshan). Also, take advantage of last grace-period forcing, the opportunity to do so noted by Steve Rostedt. And apply simplified #ifdef condition suggested by Frederic Weisbecker. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josh@joshtriplett.org Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org Cc: Valdis.Kletnieks@vt.edu Cc: dhowells@redhat.com LKML-Reference: <1266887105-1528-15-git-send-email-paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
12 years ago
config RCU_FAST_NO_HZ
bool "Accelerate last non-dyntick-idle CPU's grace periods"
depends on TREE_RCU && NO_HZ && SMP
default n
help
This option causes RCU to attempt to accelerate grace periods
in order to allow the final CPU to enter dynticks-idle state
more quickly. On the other hand, this option increases the
overhead of the dynticks-idle checking, particularly on systems
with large numbers of CPUs.
Say Y if energy efficiency is critically important, particularly
if you have relatively few CPUs.
Say N if you are unsure.
config TREE_RCU_TRACE
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
def_bool RCU_TRACE && ( TREE_RCU || TREE_PREEMPT_RCU )
select DEBUG_FS
help
rcu: Merge preemptable-RCU functionality into hierarchical RCU Create a kernel/rcutree_plugin.h file that contains definitions for preemptable RCU (or, under the #else branch of the #ifdef, empty definitions for the classic non-preemptable semantics). These definitions fit into plugins defined in kernel/rcutree.c for this purpose. This variant of preemptable RCU uses a new algorithm whose read-side expense is roughly that of classic hierarchical RCU under CONFIG_PREEMPT. This new algorithm's update-side expense is similar to that of classic hierarchical RCU, and, in absence of read-side preemption or blocking, is exactly that of classic hierarchical RCU. Perhaps more important, this new algorithm has a much simpler implementation, saving well over 1,000 lines of code compared to mainline's implementation of preemptable RCU, which will hopefully be retired in favor of this new algorithm. The simplifications are obtained by maintaining per-task nesting state for running tasks, and using a simple lock-protected algorithm to handle accounting when tasks block within RCU read-side critical sections, making use of lessons learned while creating numerous user-level RCU implementations over the past 18 months. Signed-off-by: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: laijs@cn.fujitsu.com Cc: dipankar@in.ibm.com Cc: akpm@linux-foundation.org Cc: mathieu.desnoyers@polymtl.ca Cc: josht@linux.vnet.ibm.com Cc: dvhltc@us.ibm.com Cc: niv@us.ibm.com Cc: peterz@infradead.org Cc: rostedt@goodmis.org LKML-Reference: <12509746134003-git-send-email-> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
13 years ago
This option provides tracing for the TREE_RCU and
TREE_PREEMPT_RCU implementations, permitting Makefile to
trivially select kernel/rcutree_trace.c.
config RCU_BOOST
bool "Enable RCU priority boosting"
depends on RT_MUTEXES && TINY_PREEMPT_RCU
default n
help
This option boosts the priority of preempted RCU readers that
block the current preemptible RCU grace period for too long.
This option also prevents heavy loads from blocking RCU
callback invocation for all flavors of RCU.
Say Y here if you are working with real-time apps or heavy loads
Say N here if you are unsure.
config RCU_BOOST_PRIO
int "Real-time priority to boost RCU readers to"
range 1 99
depends on RCU_BOOST
default 1
help
This option specifies the real-time priority to which preempted
RCU readers are to be boosted. If you are working with CPU-bound
real-time applications, you should specify a priority higher then
the highest-priority CPU-bound application.
Specify the real-time priority, or take the default if unsure.
config RCU_BOOST_DELAY
int "Milliseconds to delay boosting after RCU grace-period start"
range 0 3000
depends on RCU_BOOST
default 500
help
This option specifies the time to wait after the beginning of
a given grace period before priority-boosting preempted RCU
readers blocking that grace period. Note that any RCU reader
blocking an expedited RCU grace period is boosted immediately.
Accept the default if unsure.
endmenu # "RCU Subsystem"
config IKCONFIG
tristate "Kernel .config support"
---help---
This option enables the complete Linux kernel ".config" file
contents to be saved in the kernel. It provides documentation
of which kernel options are used in a running kernel or in an
on-disk kernel. This information can be extracted from the kernel
image file with the script scripts/extract-ikconfig and used as
input to rebuild the current kernel or to build another kernel.
It can also be extracted from a running kernel by reading
/proc/config.gz if enabled (below).
config IKCONFIG_PROC
bool "Enable access to .config through /proc/config.gz"
depends on IKCONFIG && PROC_FS
---help---
This option enables access to the kernel configuration file
through /proc/config.gz.
config LOG_BUF_SHIFT
int "Kernel log buffer size (16 => 64KB, 17 => 128KB)"
range 12 21
default 17
help
Select kernel log buffer size as a power of 2.
Examples:
17 => 128 KB
16 => 64 KB
15 => 32 KB
14 => 16 KB
13 => 8 KB
12 => 4 KB
#
# Architectures with an unreliable sched_clock() should select this:
#
config HAVE_UNSTABLE_SCHED_CLOCK
bool
menuconfig CGROUPS
boolean "Control Group support"
cgroup: implement eventfd-based generic API for notifications This patchset introduces eventfd-based API for notifications in cgroups and implements memory notifications on top of it. It uses statistics in memory controler to track memory usage. Output of time(1) on building kernel on tmpfs: Root cgroup before changes: make -j2 506.37 user 60.93s system 193% cpu 4:52.77 total Non-root cgroup before changes: make -j2 507.14 user 62.66s system 193% cpu 4:54.74 total Root cgroup after changes (0 thresholds): make -j2 507.13 user 62.20s system 193% cpu 4:53.55 total Non-root cgroup after changes (0 thresholds): make -j2 507.70 user 64.20s system 193% cpu 4:55.70 total Root cgroup after changes (1 thresholds, never crossed): make -j2 506.97 user 62.20s system 193% cpu 4:53.90 total Non-root cgroup after changes (1 thresholds, never crossed): make -j2 507.55 user 64.08s system 193% cpu 4:55.63 total This patch: Introduce the write-only file "cgroup.event_control" in every cgroup. To register new notification handler you need: - create an eventfd; - open a control file to be monitored. Callbacks register_event() and unregister_event() must be defined for the control file; - write "<event_fd> <control_fd> <args>" to cgroup.event_control. Interpretation of args is defined by control file implementation; eventfd will be woken up by control file implementation or when the cgroup is removed. To unregister notification handler just close eventfd. If you need notification functionality for a control file you have to implement callbacks register_event() and unregister_event() in the struct cftype. [kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com: Kconfig fix] Signed-off-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name> Reviewed-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Paul Menage <menage@google.com> Cc: Li Zefan <lizf@cn.fujitsu.com> Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Pavel Emelyanov <xemul@openvz.org> Cc: Dan Malek <dan@embeddedalley.com> Cc: Vladislav Buzov <vbuzov@embeddedalley.com> Cc: Daisuke Nishimura <nishimura@mxp.nes.nec.co.jp> Cc: Alexander Shishkin <virtuoso@slind.org> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
12 years ago
depends on EVENTFD
help
This option adds support for grouping sets of processes together, for
use with process control subsystems such as Cpusets, CFS, memory
controls or device isolation.
See
- Documentation/scheduler/sched-design-CFS.txt (CFS)
- Documentation/cgroups/ (features for grouping, isolation
and resource control)
Say N if unsure.
if CGROUPS
config CGROUP_DEBUG
bool "Example debug cgroup subsystem"
default n
help
This option enables a simple cgroup subsystem that
exports useful debugging information about the cgroups
framework.
Say N if unsure.
config CGROUP_NS
bool "Namespace cgroup subsystem"
help
Provides a simple namespace cgroup subsystem to
provide hierarchical naming of sets of namespaces,
for instance virtual servers and checkpoint/restart
jobs.
config CGROUP_FREEZER
bool "Freezer cgroup subsystem"
help
Provides a way to freeze and unfreeze all tasks in a
cgroup.
config CGROUP_DEVICE
bool "Device controller for cgroups"
help
Provides a cgroup implementing whitelists for devices which
a process in the cgroup can mknod or open.
config CPUSETS
bool "Cpuset support"
help
This option will let you create and manage CPUSETs which
allow dynamically partitioning a system into sets of CPUs and
Memory Nodes and assigning tasks to run only within those sets.
This is primarily useful on large SMP or NUMA systems.
Say N if unsure.
config PROC_PID_CPUSET
bool "Include legacy /proc/<pid>/cpuset file"
depends on CPUSETS
default y
sched: cpu accounting controller (V2) Commit cfb5285660aad4931b2ebbfa902ea48a37dfffa1 removed a useful feature for us, which provided a cpu accounting resource controller. This feature would be useful if someone wants to group tasks only for accounting purpose and doesnt really want to exercise any control over their cpu consumption. The patch below reintroduces the feature. It is based on Paul Menage's original patch (Commit 62d0df64065e7c135d0002f069444fbdfc64768f), with these differences: - Removed load average information. I felt it needs more thought (esp to deal with SMP and virtualized platforms) and can be added for 2.6.25 after more discussions. - Convert group cpu usage to be nanosecond accurate (as rest of the cfs stats are) and invoke cpuacct_charge() from the respective scheduler classes - Make accounting scalable on SMP systems by splitting the usage counter to be per-cpu - Move the code from kernel/cpu_acct.c to kernel/sched.c (since the code is not big enough to warrant a new file and also this rightly needs to live inside the scheduler. Also things like accessing rq->lock while reading cpu usage becomes easier if the code lived in kernel/sched.c) The patch also modifies the cpu controller not to provide the same accounting information. Tested-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Tested the patches on top of 2.6.24-rc3. The patches work fine. Ran some simple tests like cpuspin (spin on the cpu), ran several tasks in the same group and timed them. Compared their time stamps with cpuacct.usage. Signed-off-by: Srivatsa Vaddagiri <vatsa@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
14 years ago
config CGROUP_CPUACCT
bool "Simple CPU accounting cgroup subsystem"
help
Provides a simple Resource Controller for monitoring the
total CPU consumed by the tasks in a cgroup.
sched: cpu accounting controller (V2) Commit cfb5285660aad4931b2ebbfa902ea48a37dfffa1 removed a useful feature for us, which provided a cpu accounting resource controller. This feature would be useful if someone wants to group tasks only for accounting purpose and doesnt really want to exercise any control over their cpu consumption. The patch below reintroduces the feature. It is based on Paul Menage's original patch (Commit 62d0df64065e7c135d0002f069444fbdfc64768f), with these differences: - Removed load average information. I felt it needs more thought (esp to deal with SMP and virtualized platforms) and can be added for 2.6.25 after more discussions. - Convert group cpu usage to be nanosecond accurate (as rest of the cfs stats are) and invoke cpuacct_charge() from the respective scheduler classes - Make accounting scalable on SMP systems by splitting the usage counter to be per-cpu - Move the code from kernel/cpu_acct.c to kernel/sched.c (since the code is not big enough to warrant a new file and also this rightly needs to live inside the scheduler. Also things like accessing rq->lock while reading cpu usage becomes easier if the code lived in kernel/sched.c) The patch also modifies the cpu controller not to provide the same accounting information. Tested-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Tested the patches on top of 2.6.24-rc3. The patches work fine. Ran some simple tests like cpuspin (spin on the cpu), ran several tasks in the same group and timed them. Compared their time stamps with cpuacct.usage. Signed-off-by: Srivatsa Vaddagiri <vatsa@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
14 years ago
config RESOURCE_COUNTERS
bool "Resource counters"
help
This option enables controller independent resource accounting
infrastructure that works with cgroups.
config CGROUP_MEM_RES_CTLR
bool "Memory Resource Controller for Control Groups"
depends on RESOURCE_COUNTERS
cgroups: add an owner to the mm_struct Remove the mem_cgroup member from mm_struct and instead adds an owner. This approach was suggested by Paul Menage. The advantage of this approach is that, once the mm->owner is known, using the subsystem id, the cgroup can be determined. It also allows several control groups that are virtually grouped by mm_struct, to exist independent of the memory controller i.e., without adding mem_cgroup's for each controller, to mm_struct. A new config option CONFIG_MM_OWNER is added and the memory resource controller selects this config option. This patch also adds cgroup callbacks to notify subsystems when mm->owner changes. The mm_cgroup_changed callback is called with the task_lock() of the new task held and is called just prior to changing the mm->owner. I am indebted to Paul Menage for the several reviews of this patchset and helping me make it lighter and simpler. This patch was tested on a powerpc box, it was compiled with both the MM_OWNER config turned on and off. After the thread group leader exits, it's moved to init_css_state by cgroup_exit(), thus all future charges from runnings threads would be redirected to the init_css_set's subsystem. Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Pavel Emelianov <xemul@openvz.org> Cc: Hugh Dickins <hugh@veritas.com> Cc: Sudhir Kumar <skumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: YAMAMOTO Takashi <yamamoto@valinux.co.jp> Cc: Hirokazu Takahashi <taka@valinux.co.jp> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>, Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Acked-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Acked-by: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi> Reviewed-by: Paul Menage <menage@google.com> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
select MM_OWNER
help
Provides a memory resource controller that manages both anonymous
memory and page cache. (See Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt)
Note that setting this option increases fixed memory overhead
associated with each page of memory in the system. By this,
20(40)bytes/PAGE_SIZE on 32(64)bit system will be occupied by memory
usage tracking struct at boot. Total amount of this is printed out
at boot.
Only enable when you're ok with these trade offs and really
sure you need the memory resource controller. Even when you enable
this, you can set "cgroup_disable=memory" at your boot option to
disable memory resource controller and you can avoid overheads.
(and lose benefits of memory resource controller)
cgroups: add an owner to the mm_struct Remove the mem_cgroup member from mm_struct and instead adds an owner. This approach was suggested by Paul Menage. The advantage of this approach is that, once the mm->owner is known, using the subsystem id, the cgroup can be determined. It also allows several control groups that are virtually grouped by mm_struct, to exist independent of the memory controller i.e., without adding mem_cgroup's for each controller, to mm_struct. A new config option CONFIG_MM_OWNER is added and the memory resource controller selects this config option. This patch also adds cgroup callbacks to notify subsystems when mm->owner changes. The mm_cgroup_changed callback is called with the task_lock() of the new task held and is called just prior to changing the mm->owner. I am indebted to Paul Menage for the several reviews of this patchset and helping me make it lighter and simpler. This patch was tested on a powerpc box, it was compiled with both the MM_OWNER config turned on and off. After the thread group leader exits, it's moved to init_css_state by cgroup_exit(), thus all future charges from runnings threads would be redirected to the init_css_set's subsystem. Signed-off-by: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: Pavel Emelianov <xemul@openvz.org> Cc: Hugh Dickins <hugh@veritas.com> Cc: Sudhir Kumar <skumar@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Cc: YAMAMOTO Takashi <yamamoto@valinux.co.jp> Cc: Hirokazu Takahashi <taka@valinux.co.jp> Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>, Cc: Balbir Singh <balbir@linux.vnet.ibm.com> Acked-by: KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com> Acked-by: Pekka Enberg <penberg@cs.helsinki.fi> Reviewed-by: Paul Menage <menage@google.com> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
This config option also selects MM_OWNER config option, which
could in turn add some fork/exit overhead.
config CGROUP_MEM_RES_CTLR_SWAP
bool "Memory Resource Controller Swap Extension"
depends on CGROUP_MEM_RES_CTLR && SWAP
help
Add swap management feature to memory resource controller. When you
enable this, you can limit mem+swap usage per cgroup. In other words,
when you disable this, memory resource controller has no cares to
usage of swap...a process can exhaust all of the swap. This extension
is useful when you want to avoid exhaustion swap but this itself
adds more overheads and consumes memory for remembering information.
Especially if you use 32bit system or small memory system, please
be careful about enabling this. When memory resource controller
is disabled by boot option, this will be automatically disabled and
there will be no overhead from this. Even when you set this config=y,
if boot option "noswapaccount" is set, swap will not be accounted.
Now, memory usage of swap_cgroup is 2 bytes per entry. If swap page
size is 4096bytes, 512k per 1Gbytes of swap.
config CGROUP_MEM_RES_CTLR_SWAP_ENABLED
bool "Memory Resource Controller Swap Extension enabled by default"
depends on CGROUP_MEM_RES_CTLR_SWAP
default y
help
Memory Resource Controller Swap Extension comes with its price in
a bigger memory consumption. General purpose distribution kernels
which want to enable the feature but keep it disabled by default
and let the user enable it by swapaccount boot command line
parameter should have this option unselected.
For those who want to have the feature enabled by default should
select this option (if, for some reason, they need to disable it
then noswapaccount does the trick).
menuconfig CGROUP_SCHED
bool "Group CPU scheduler"
depends on EXPERIMENTAL
default n
help
This feature lets CPU scheduler recognize task groups and control CPU
bandwidth allocation to such task groups. It uses cgroups to group
tasks.
if CGROUP_SCHED
config FAIR_GROUP_SCHED