original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
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tracing/events: convert block trace points to TRACE_EVENT() TRACE_EVENT is a more generic way to define tracepoints. Doing so adds these new capabilities to this tracepoint: - zero-copy and per-cpu splice() tracing - binary tracing without printf overhead - structured logging records exposed under /debug/tracing/events - trace events embedded in function tracer output and other plugins - user-defined, per tracepoint filter expressions ... Cons: - no dev_t info for the output of plug, unplug_timer and unplug_io events. no dev_t info for getrq and sleeprq events if bio == NULL. no dev_t info for rq_abort,...,rq_requeue events if rq->rq_disk == NULL. This is mainly because we can't get the deivce from a request queue. But this may change in the future. - A packet command is converted to a string in TP_assign, not TP_print. While blktrace do the convertion just before output. Since pc requests should be rather rare, this is not a big issue. - In blktrace, an event can have 2 different print formats, but a TRACE_EVENT has a unique format, which means we have some unused data in a trace entry. The overhead is minimized by using __dynamic_array() instead of __array(). I've benchmarked the ioctl blktrace vs the splice based TRACE_EVENT tracing: dd dd + ioctl blktrace dd + TRACE_EVENT (splice) 1 7.36s, 42.7 MB/s 7.50s, 42.0 MB/s 7.41s, 42.5 MB/s 2 7.43s, 42.3 MB/s 7.48s, 42.1 MB/s 7.43s, 42.4 MB/s 3 7.38s, 42.6 MB/s 7.45s, 42.2 MB/s 7.41s, 42.5 MB/s So the overhead of tracing is very small, and no regression when using those trace events vs blktrace. And the binary output of TRACE_EVENT is much smaller than blktrace: # ls -l -h -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 8.8M 06-09 13:24 sda.blktrace.0 -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 195K 06-09 13:24 sda.blktrace.1 -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 2.7M 06-09 13:25 trace_splice.out Following are some comparisons between TRACE_EVENT and blktrace: plug: kjournald-480 [000] 303.084981: block_plug: [kjournald] kjournald-480 [000] 303.084981: 8,0 P N [kjournald] unplug_io: kblockd/0-118 [000] 300.052973: block_unplug_io: [kblockd/0] 1 kblockd/0-118 [000] 300.052974: 8,0 U N [kblockd/0] 1 remap: kjournald-480 [000] 303.085042: block_remap: 8,0 W 102736992 + 8 <- (8,8) 33384 kjournald-480 [000] 303.085043: 8,0 A W 102736992 + 8 <- (8,8) 33384 bio_backmerge: kjournald-480 [000] 303.085086: block_bio_backmerge: 8,0 W 102737032 + 8 [kjournald] kjournald-480 [000] 303.085086: 8,0 M W 102737032 + 8 [kjournald] getrq: kjournald-480 [000] 303.084974: block_getrq: 8,0 W 102736984 + 8 [kjournald] kjournald-480 [000] 303.084975: 8,0 G W 102736984 + 8 [kjournald] bash-2066 [001] 1072.953770: 8,0 G N [bash] bash-2066 [001] 1072.953773: block_getrq: 0,0 N 0 + 0 [bash] rq_complete: konsole-2065 [001] 300.053184: block_rq_complete: 8,0 W () 103669040 + 16 [0] konsole-2065 [001] 300.053191: 8,0 C W 103669040 + 16 [0] ksoftirqd/1-7 [001] 1072.953811: 8,0 C N (5a 00 08 00 00 00 00 00 24 00) [0] ksoftirqd/1-7 [001] 1072.953813: block_rq_complete: 0,0 N (5a 00 08 00 00 00 00 00 24 00) 0 + 0 [0] rq_insert: kjournald-480 [000] 303.084985: block_rq_insert: 8,0 W 0 () 102736984 + 8 [kjournald] kjournald-480 [000] 303.084986: 8,0 I W 102736984 + 8 [kjournald] Changelog from v2 -> v3: - use the newly introduced __dynamic_array(). Changelog from v1 -> v2: - use __string() instead of __array() to minimize the memory required to store hex dump of rq->cmd(). - support large pc requests. - add missing blk_fill_rwbs_rq() in block_rq_requeue TRACE_EVENT. - some cleanups. Signed-off-by: Li Zefan <lizf@cn.fujitsu.com> LKML-Reference: <4A2DF669.5070905@cn.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
13 years ago
block: fix accounting bug on cross partition merges /proc/diskstats would display a strange output as follows. $ cat /proc/diskstats |grep sda 8 0 sda 90524 7579 102154 20464 0 0 0 0 0 14096 20089 8 1 sda1 19085 1352 21841 4209 0 0 0 0 4294967064 15689 4293424691 ~~~~~~~~~~ 8 2 sda2 71252 3624 74891 15950 0 0 0 0 232 23995 1562390 8 3 sda3 54 487 2188 92 0 0 0 0 0 88 92 8 4 sda4 4 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 sda5 81 2027 2130 138 0 0 0 0 0 87 137 Its reason is the wrong way of accounting hd_struct->in_flight. When a bio is merged into a request belongs to different partition by ELEVATOR_FRONT_MERGE. The detailed root cause is as follows. Assuming that there are two partition, sda1 and sda2. 1. A request for sda2 is in request_queue. Hence sda1's hd_struct->in_flight is 0 and sda2's one is 1. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 2. A bio belongs to sda1 is issued and is merged into the request mentioned on step1 by ELEVATOR_BACK_MERGE. The first sector of the request is changed from sda2 region to sda1 region. However the two partition's hd_struct->in_flight are not changed. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 3. The request is finished and blk_account_io_done() is called. In this case, sda2's hd_struct->in_flight, not a sda1's one, is decremented. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | -1 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- The patch fixes the problem by caching the partition lookup inside the request structure, hence making sure that the increment and decrement will always happen on the same partition struct. This also speeds up IO with accounting enabled, since it cuts down on the number of lookups we have to do. Also add a refcount to struct hd_struct to keep the partition in memory as long as users exist. We use kref_test_and_get() to ensure we don't add a reference to a partition which is going away. Signed-off-by: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Yasuaki Ishimatsu <isimatu.yasuaki@jp.fujitsu.com> Cc: stable@kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix accounting bug on cross partition merges /proc/diskstats would display a strange output as follows. $ cat /proc/diskstats |grep sda 8 0 sda 90524 7579 102154 20464 0 0 0 0 0 14096 20089 8 1 sda1 19085 1352 21841 4209 0 0 0 0 4294967064 15689 4293424691 ~~~~~~~~~~ 8 2 sda2 71252 3624 74891 15950 0 0 0 0 232 23995 1562390 8 3 sda3 54 487 2188 92 0 0 0 0 0 88 92 8 4 sda4 4 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 sda5 81 2027 2130 138 0 0 0 0 0 87 137 Its reason is the wrong way of accounting hd_struct->in_flight. When a bio is merged into a request belongs to different partition by ELEVATOR_FRONT_MERGE. The detailed root cause is as follows. Assuming that there are two partition, sda1 and sda2. 1. A request for sda2 is in request_queue. Hence sda1's hd_struct->in_flight is 0 and sda2's one is 1. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 2. A bio belongs to sda1 is issued and is merged into the request mentioned on step1 by ELEVATOR_BACK_MERGE. The first sector of the request is changed from sda2 region to sda1 region. However the two partition's hd_struct->in_flight are not changed. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 3. The request is finished and blk_account_io_done() is called. In this case, sda2's hd_struct->in_flight, not a sda1's one, is decremented. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | -1 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- The patch fixes the problem by caching the partition lookup inside the request structure, hence making sure that the increment and decrement will always happen on the same partition struct. This also speeds up IO with accounting enabled, since it cuts down on the number of lookups we have to do. Also add a refcount to struct hd_struct to keep the partition in memory as long as users exist. We use kref_test_and_get() to ensure we don't add a reference to a partition which is going away. Signed-off-by: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Yasuaki Ishimatsu <isimatu.yasuaki@jp.fujitsu.com> Cc: stable@kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix accounting bug on cross partition merges /proc/diskstats would display a strange output as follows. $ cat /proc/diskstats |grep sda 8 0 sda 90524 7579 102154 20464 0 0 0 0 0 14096 20089 8 1 sda1 19085 1352 21841 4209 0 0 0 0 4294967064 15689 4293424691 ~~~~~~~~~~ 8 2 sda2 71252 3624 74891 15950 0 0 0 0 232 23995 1562390 8 3 sda3 54 487 2188 92 0 0 0 0 0 88 92 8 4 sda4 4 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 sda5 81 2027 2130 138 0 0 0 0 0 87 137 Its reason is the wrong way of accounting hd_struct->in_flight. When a bio is merged into a request belongs to different partition by ELEVATOR_FRONT_MERGE. The detailed root cause is as follows. Assuming that there are two partition, sda1 and sda2. 1. A request for sda2 is in request_queue. Hence sda1's hd_struct->in_flight is 0 and sda2's one is 1. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 2. A bio belongs to sda1 is issued and is merged into the request mentioned on step1 by ELEVATOR_BACK_MERGE. The first sector of the request is changed from sda2 region to sda1 region. However the two partition's hd_struct->in_flight are not changed. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 3. The request is finished and blk_account_io_done() is called. In this case, sda2's hd_struct->in_flight, not a sda1's one, is decremented. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | -1 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- The patch fixes the problem by caching the partition lookup inside the request structure, hence making sure that the increment and decrement will always happen on the same partition struct. This also speeds up IO with accounting enabled, since it cuts down on the number of lookups we have to do. Also add a refcount to struct hd_struct to keep the partition in memory as long as users exist. We use kref_test_and_get() to ensure we don't add a reference to a partition which is going away. Signed-off-by: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Yasuaki Ishimatsu <isimatu.yasuaki@jp.fujitsu.com> Cc: stable@kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix accounting bug on cross partition merges /proc/diskstats would display a strange output as follows. $ cat /proc/diskstats |grep sda 8 0 sda 90524 7579 102154 20464 0 0 0 0 0 14096 20089 8 1 sda1 19085 1352 21841 4209 0 0 0 0 4294967064 15689 4293424691 ~~~~~~~~~~ 8 2 sda2 71252 3624 74891 15950 0 0 0 0 232 23995 1562390 8 3 sda3 54 487 2188 92 0 0 0 0 0 88 92 8 4 sda4 4 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 sda5 81 2027 2130 138 0 0 0 0 0 87 137 Its reason is the wrong way of accounting hd_struct->in_flight. When a bio is merged into a request belongs to different partition by ELEVATOR_FRONT_MERGE. The detailed root cause is as follows. Assuming that there are two partition, sda1 and sda2. 1. A request for sda2 is in request_queue. Hence sda1's hd_struct->in_flight is 0 and sda2's one is 1. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 2. A bio belongs to sda1 is issued and is merged into the request mentioned on step1 by ELEVATOR_BACK_MERGE. The first sector of the request is changed from sda2 region to sda1 region. However the two partition's hd_struct->in_flight are not changed. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 3. The request is finished and blk_account_io_done() is called. In this case, sda2's hd_struct->in_flight, not a sda1's one, is decremented. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | -1 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- The patch fixes the problem by caching the partition lookup inside the request structure, hence making sure that the increment and decrement will always happen on the same partition struct. This also speeds up IO with accounting enabled, since it cuts down on the number of lookups we have to do. Also add a refcount to struct hd_struct to keep the partition in memory as long as users exist. We use kref_test_and_get() to ensure we don't add a reference to a partition which is going away. Signed-off-by: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Yasuaki Ishimatsu <isimatu.yasuaki@jp.fujitsu.com> Cc: stable@kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix accounting bug on cross partition merges /proc/diskstats would display a strange output as follows. $ cat /proc/diskstats |grep sda 8 0 sda 90524 7579 102154 20464 0 0 0 0 0 14096 20089 8 1 sda1 19085 1352 21841 4209 0 0 0 0 4294967064 15689 4293424691 ~~~~~~~~~~ 8 2 sda2 71252 3624 74891 15950 0 0 0 0 232 23995 1562390 8 3 sda3 54 487 2188 92 0 0 0 0 0 88 92 8 4 sda4 4 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 sda5 81 2027 2130 138 0 0 0 0 0 87 137 Its reason is the wrong way of accounting hd_struct->in_flight. When a bio is merged into a request belongs to different partition by ELEVATOR_FRONT_MERGE. The detailed root cause is as follows. Assuming that there are two partition, sda1 and sda2. 1. A request for sda2 is in request_queue. Hence sda1's hd_struct->in_flight is 0 and sda2's one is 1. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 2. A bio belongs to sda1 is issued and is merged into the request mentioned on step1 by ELEVATOR_BACK_MERGE. The first sector of the request is changed from sda2 region to sda1 region. However the two partition's hd_struct->in_flight are not changed. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 3. The request is finished and blk_account_io_done() is called. In this case, sda2's hd_struct->in_flight, not a sda1's one, is decremented. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | -1 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- The patch fixes the problem by caching the partition lookup inside the request structure, hence making sure that the increment and decrement will always happen on the same partition struct. This also speeds up IO with accounting enabled, since it cuts down on the number of lookups we have to do. Also add a refcount to struct hd_struct to keep the partition in memory as long as users exist. We use kref_test_and_get() to ensure we don't add a reference to a partition which is going away. Signed-off-by: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Yasuaki Ishimatsu <isimatu.yasuaki@jp.fujitsu.com> Cc: stable@kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix accounting bug on cross partition merges /proc/diskstats would display a strange output as follows. $ cat /proc/diskstats |grep sda 8 0 sda 90524 7579 102154 20464 0 0 0 0 0 14096 20089 8 1 sda1 19085 1352 21841 4209 0 0 0 0 4294967064 15689 4293424691 ~~~~~~~~~~ 8 2 sda2 71252 3624 74891 15950 0 0 0 0 232 23995 1562390 8 3 sda3 54 487 2188 92 0 0 0 0 0 88 92 8 4 sda4 4 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 sda5 81 2027 2130 138 0 0 0 0 0 87 137 Its reason is the wrong way of accounting hd_struct->in_flight. When a bio is merged into a request belongs to different partition by ELEVATOR_FRONT_MERGE. The detailed root cause is as follows. Assuming that there are two partition, sda1 and sda2. 1. A request for sda2 is in request_queue. Hence sda1's hd_struct->in_flight is 0 and sda2's one is 1. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 2. A bio belongs to sda1 is issued and is merged into the request mentioned on step1 by ELEVATOR_BACK_MERGE. The first sector of the request is changed from sda2 region to sda1 region. However the two partition's hd_struct->in_flight are not changed. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | 0 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- 3. The request is finished and blk_account_io_done() is called. In this case, sda2's hd_struct->in_flight, not a sda1's one, is decremented. | hd_struct->in_flight --------------------------- sda1 | -1 sda2 | 1 --------------------------- The patch fixes the problem by caching the partition lookup inside the request structure, hence making sure that the increment and decrement will always happen on the same partition struct. This also speeds up IO with accounting enabled, since it cuts down on the number of lookups we have to do. Also add a refcount to struct hd_struct to keep the partition in memory as long as users exist. We use kref_test_and_get() to ensure we don't add a reference to a partition which is going away. Signed-off-by: Jerome Marchand <jmarchan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Yasuaki Ishimatsu <isimatu.yasuaki@jp.fujitsu.com> Cc: stable@kernel.org Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: Supress Buffer I/O errors when SCSI REQ_QUIET flag set Allow the scsi request REQ_QUIET flag to be propagated to the buffer file system layer. The basic ideas is to pass the flag from the scsi request to the bio (block IO) and then to the buffer layer. The buffer layer can then suppress needless printks. This patch declutters the kernel log by removed the 40-50 (per lun) buffer io error messages seen during a boot in my multipath setup . It is a good chance any real errors will be missed in the "noise" it the logs without this patch. During boot I see blocks of messages like " __ratelimit: 211 callbacks suppressed Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242879 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242879 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242847 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 1 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242878 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242879 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242879 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242879 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242879 Buffer I/O error on device sdm, logical block 5242872 " in my logs. My disk environment is multipath fiber channel using the SCSI_DH_RDAC code and multipathd. This topology includes an "active" and "ghost" path for each lun. IO's to the "ghost" path will never complete and the SCSI layer, via the scsi device handler rdac code, quick returns the IOs to theses paths and sets the REQ_QUIET scsi flag to suppress the scsi layer messages. I am wanting to extend the QUIET behavior to include the buffer file system layer to deal with these errors as well. I have been running this patch for a while now on several boxes without issue. A few runs of bonnie++ show no noticeable difference in performance in my setup. Thanks for John Stultz for the quiet_error finalization. Submitted-by: Keith Mannthey <kmannth@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jens.axboe@oracle.com>
13 years ago
block: convert to pos and nr_sectors accessors With recent cleanups, there is no place where low level driver directly manipulates request fields. This means that the 'hard' request fields always equal the !hard fields. Convert all rq->sectors, nr_sectors and current_nr_sectors references to accessors. While at it, drop superflous blk_rq_pos() < 0 test in swim.c. [ Impact: use pos and nr_sectors accessors ] Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <Geert.Uytterhoeven@sonycom.com> Tested-by: Grant Likely <grant.likely@secretlab.ca> Acked-by: Grant Likely <grant.likely@secretlab.ca> Tested-by: Adrian McMenamin <adrian@mcmen.demon.co.uk> Acked-by: Adrian McMenamin <adrian@mcmen.demon.co.uk> Acked-by: Mike Miller <mike.miller@hp.com> Cc: James Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com> Cc: Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz <bzolnier@gmail.com> Cc: Borislav Petkov <petkovbb@googlemail.com> Cc: Sergei Shtylyov <sshtylyov@ru.mvista.com> Cc: Eric Moore <Eric.Moore@lsi.com> Cc: Alan Stern <stern@rowland.harvard.edu> Cc: FUJITA Tomonori <fujita.tomonori@lab.ntt.co.jp> Cc: Pete Zaitcev <zaitcev@redhat.com> Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au> Cc: Paul Clements <paul.clements@steeleye.com> Cc: Tim Waugh <tim@cyberelk.net> Cc: Jeff Garzik <jgarzik@pobox.com> Cc: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy@xensource.com> Cc: Alex Dubov <oakad@yahoo.com> Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Cc: Dario Ballabio <ballabio_dario@emc.com> Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: unsik Kim <donari75@gmail.com> Cc: Laurent Vivier <Laurent@lvivier.info> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jens.axboe@oracle.com>
13 years ago
block: drop request->hard_* and *nr_sectors struct request has had a few different ways to represent some properties of a request. ->hard_* represent block layer's view of the request progress (completion cursor) and the ones without the prefix are supposed to represent the issue cursor and allowed to be updated as necessary by the low level drivers. The thing is that as block layer supports partial completion, the two cursors really aren't necessary and only cause confusion. In addition, manual management of request detail from low level drivers is cumbersome and error-prone at the very least. Another interesting duplicate fields are rq->[hard_]nr_sectors and rq->{hard_cur|current}_nr_sectors against rq->data_len and rq->bio->bi_size. This is more convoluted than the hard_ case. rq->[hard_]nr_sectors are initialized for requests with bio but blk_rq_bytes() uses it only for !pc requests. rq->data_len is initialized for all request but blk_rq_bytes() uses it only for pc requests. This causes good amount of confusion throughout block layer and its drivers and determining the request length has been a bit of black magic which may or may not work depending on circumstances and what the specific LLD is actually doing. rq->{hard_cur|current}_nr_sectors represent the number of sectors in the contiguous data area at the front. This is mainly used by drivers which transfers data by walking request segment-by-segment. This value always equals rq->bio->bi_size >> 9. However, data length for pc requests may not be multiple of 512 bytes and using this field becomes a bit confusing. In general, having multiple fields to represent the same property leads only to confusion and subtle bugs. With recent block low level driver cleanups, no driver is accessing or manipulating these duplicate fields directly. Drop all the duplicates. Now rq->sector means the current sector, rq->data_len the current total length and rq->bio->bi_size the current segment length. Everything else is defined in terms of these three and available only through accessors. * blk_recalc_rq_sectors() is collapsed into blk_update_request() and now handles pc and fs requests equally other than rq->sector update. This means that now pc requests can use partial completion too (no in-kernel user yet tho). * bio_cur_sectors() is replaced with bio_cur_bytes() as block layer now uses byte count as the primary data length. * blk_rq_pos() is now guranteed to be always correct. In-block users converted. * blk_rq_bytes() is now guaranteed to be always valid as is blk_rq_sectors(). In-block users converted. * blk_rq_sectors() is now guaranteed to equal blk_rq_bytes() >> 9. More convenient one is used. * blk_rq_bytes() and blk_rq_cur_bytes() are now inlined and take const pointer to request. [ Impact: API cleanup, single way to represent one property of a request ] Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Boaz Harrosh <bharrosh@panasas.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jens.axboe@oracle.com>
13 years ago
block: Move blk_throtl_exit() call to blk_cleanup_queue() Move blk_throtl_exit() in blk_cleanup_queue() as blk_throtl_exit() is written in such a way that it needs queue lock. In blk_release_queue() there is no gurantee that ->queue_lock is still around. Initially blk_throtl_exit() was in blk_cleanup_queue() but Ingo reported one problem. https://lkml.org/lkml/2010/10/23/86 And a quick fix moved blk_throtl_exit() to blk_release_queue(). commit 7ad58c028652753814054f4e3ac58f925e7343f4 Author: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com> Date: Sat Oct 23 20:40:26 2010 +0200 block: fix use-after-free bug in blk throttle code This patch reverts above change and does not try to shutdown the throtl work in blk_sync_queue(). By avoiding call to throtl_shutdown_timer_wq() from blk_sync_queue(), we should also avoid the problem reported by Ingo. blk_sync_queue() seems to be used only by md driver and it seems to be using it to make sure q->unplug_fn is not called as md registers its own unplug functions and it is about to free up the data structures used by unplug_fn(). Block throttle does not call back into unplug_fn() or into md. So there is no need to cancel blk throttle work. In fact I think cancelling block throttle work is bad because it might happen that some bios are throttled and scheduled to be dispatched later with the help of pending work and if work is cancelled, these bios might never be dispatched. Block layer also uses blk_sync_queue() during blk_cleanup_queue() and blk_release_queue() time. That should be safe as we are also calling blk_throtl_exit() which should make sure all the throttling related data structures are cleaned up. Signed-off-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: Move blk_throtl_exit() call to blk_cleanup_queue() Move blk_throtl_exit() in blk_cleanup_queue() as blk_throtl_exit() is written in such a way that it needs queue lock. In blk_release_queue() there is no gurantee that ->queue_lock is still around. Initially blk_throtl_exit() was in blk_cleanup_queue() but Ingo reported one problem. https://lkml.org/lkml/2010/10/23/86 And a quick fix moved blk_throtl_exit() to blk_release_queue(). commit 7ad58c028652753814054f4e3ac58f925e7343f4 Author: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com> Date: Sat Oct 23 20:40:26 2010 +0200 block: fix use-after-free bug in blk throttle code This patch reverts above change and does not try to shutdown the throtl work in blk_sync_queue(). By avoiding call to throtl_shutdown_timer_wq() from blk_sync_queue(), we should also avoid the problem reported by Ingo. blk_sync_queue() seems to be used only by md driver and it seems to be using it to make sure q->unplug_fn is not called as md registers its own unplug functions and it is about to free up the data structures used by unplug_fn(). Block throttle does not call back into unplug_fn() or into md. So there is no need to cancel blk throttle work. In fact I think cancelling block throttle work is bad because it might happen that some bios are throttled and scheduled to be dispatched later with the help of pending work and if work is cancelled, these bios might never be dispatched. Block layer also uses blk_sync_queue() during blk_cleanup_queue() and blk_release_queue() time. That should be safe as we are also calling blk_throtl_exit() which should make sure all the throttling related data structures are cleaned up. Signed-off-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: don't kick empty queue in blk_drain_queue() While probing, fd sets up queue, probes hardware and tears down the queue if probing fails. In the process, blk_drain_queue() kicks the queue which failed to finish initialization and fd is unhappy about that. floppy0: no floppy controllers found ------------[ cut here ]------------ WARNING: at drivers/block/floppy.c:2929 do_fd_request+0xbf/0xd0() Hardware name: To Be Filled By O.E.M. VFS: do_fd_request called on non-open device Modules linked in: Pid: 1, comm: swapper Not tainted 3.2.0-rc4-00077-g5983fe2 #2 Call Trace: [<ffffffff81039a6a>] warn_slowpath_common+0x7a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81039b41>] warn_slowpath_fmt+0x41/0x50 [<ffffffff813d657f>] do_fd_request+0xbf/0xd0 [<ffffffff81322b95>] blk_drain_queue+0x65/0x80 [<ffffffff81322c93>] blk_cleanup_queue+0xe3/0x1a0 [<ffffffff818a809d>] floppy_init+0xdeb/0xe28 [<ffffffff818a72b2>] ? daring+0x6b/0x6b [<ffffffff810002af>] do_one_initcall+0x3f/0x170 [<ffffffff81884b34>] kernel_init+0x9d/0x11e [<ffffffff810317c2>] ? schedule_tail+0x22/0xa0 [<ffffffff815dbb14>] kernel_thread_helper+0x4/0x10 [<ffffffff81884a97>] ? start_kernel+0x2be/0x2be [<ffffffff815dbb10>] ? gs_change+0xb/0xb Avoid it by making blk_drain_queue() kick queue iff dispatch queue has something on it. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Reported-by: Ralf Hildebrandt <Ralf.Hildebrandt@charite.de> Reported-by: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Tested-by: Sergei Trofimovich <slyich@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: don't kick empty queue in blk_drain_queue() While probing, fd sets up queue, probes hardware and tears down the queue if probing fails. In the process, blk_drain_queue() kicks the queue which failed to finish initialization and fd is unhappy about that. floppy0: no floppy controllers found ------------[ cut here ]------------ WARNING: at drivers/block/floppy.c:2929 do_fd_request+0xbf/0xd0() Hardware name: To Be Filled By O.E.M. VFS: do_fd_request called on non-open device Modules linked in: Pid: 1, comm: swapper Not tainted 3.2.0-rc4-00077-g5983fe2 #2 Call Trace: [<ffffffff81039a6a>] warn_slowpath_common+0x7a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81039b41>] warn_slowpath_fmt+0x41/0x50 [<ffffffff813d657f>] do_fd_request+0xbf/0xd0 [<ffffffff81322b95>] blk_drain_queue+0x65/0x80 [<ffffffff81322c93>] blk_cleanup_queue+0xe3/0x1a0 [<ffffffff818a809d>] floppy_init+0xdeb/0xe28 [<ffffffff818a72b2>] ? daring+0x6b/0x6b [<ffffffff810002af>] do_one_initcall+0x3f/0x170 [<ffffffff81884b34>] kernel_init+0x9d/0x11e [<ffffffff810317c2>] ? schedule_tail+0x22/0xa0 [<ffffffff815dbb14>] kernel_thread_helper+0x4/0x10 [<ffffffff81884a97>] ? start_kernel+0x2be/0x2be [<ffffffff815dbb10>] ? gs_change+0xb/0xb Avoid it by making blk_drain_queue() kick queue iff dispatch queue has something on it. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Reported-by: Ralf Hildebrandt <Ralf.Hildebrandt@charite.de> Reported-by: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Tested-by: Sergei Trofimovich <slyich@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: don't kick empty queue in blk_drain_queue() While probing, fd sets up queue, probes hardware and tears down the queue if probing fails. In the process, blk_drain_queue() kicks the queue which failed to finish initialization and fd is unhappy about that. floppy0: no floppy controllers found ------------[ cut here ]------------ WARNING: at drivers/block/floppy.c:2929 do_fd_request+0xbf/0xd0() Hardware name: To Be Filled By O.E.M. VFS: do_fd_request called on non-open device Modules linked in: Pid: 1, comm: swapper Not tainted 3.2.0-rc4-00077-g5983fe2 #2 Call Trace: [<ffffffff81039a6a>] warn_slowpath_common+0x7a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81039b41>] warn_slowpath_fmt+0x41/0x50 [<ffffffff813d657f>] do_fd_request+0xbf/0xd0 [<ffffffff81322b95>] blk_drain_queue+0x65/0x80 [<ffffffff81322c93>] blk_cleanup_queue+0xe3/0x1a0 [<ffffffff818a809d>] floppy_init+0xdeb/0xe28 [<ffffffff818a72b2>] ? daring+0x6b/0x6b [<ffffffff810002af>] do_one_initcall+0x3f/0x170 [<ffffffff81884b34>] kernel_init+0x9d/0x11e [<ffffffff810317c2>] ? schedule_tail+0x22/0xa0 [<ffffffff815dbb14>] kernel_thread_helper+0x4/0x10 [<ffffffff81884a97>] ? start_kernel+0x2be/0x2be [<ffffffff815dbb10>] ? gs_change+0xb/0xb Avoid it by making blk_drain_queue() kick queue iff dispatch queue has something on it. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Reported-by: Ralf Hildebrandt <Ralf.Hildebrandt@charite.de> Reported-by: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Tested-by: Sergei Trofimovich <slyich@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: Initialize ->queue_lock to internal lock at queue allocation time There does not seem to be a clear convention whether q->queue_lock is initialized or not when blk_cleanup_queue() is called. In the past it was not necessary but now blk_throtl_exit() takes up queue lock by default and needs queue lock to be available. In fact elevator_exit() code also has similar requirement just that it is less stringent in the sense that elevator_exit() is called only if elevator is initialized. Two problems have been noticed because of ambiguity about spin lock status. - If a driver calls blk_alloc_queue() and then soon calls blk_cleanup_queue() almost immediately, (because some other driver structure allocation failed or some other error happened) then blk_throtl_exit() will run into issues as queue lock is not initialized. Loop driver ran into this issue recently and I noticed error paths in md driver too. Similar error paths should exist in other drivers too. - If some driver provided external spin lock and zapped the lock before blk_cleanup_queue(), then it can lead to issues. So this patch initializes the default queue lock at queue allocation time. block throttling code is one of the users of queue lock and it is initialized at the queue allocation time, so it makes sense to initialize ->queue_lock also to internal lock. A driver can overide that lock later. This will take care of the issue where a driver does not have to worry about initializing the queue lock to default before calling blk_cleanup_queue() Signed-off-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: Mitigate lock unbalance caused by lock switching Commit 777eb1bf15b8532c396821774bf6451e563438f5 disconnects externally supplied queue_lock before blk_drain_queue(). Switching the lock would introduce lock unbalance because theads which have taken the external lock might unlock the internal lock in the during the queue drain. This patch mitigate this by disconnecting the lock after the queue draining since queue draining makes a lot of request_queue users go away. However, please note, this patch only makes the problem less likely to happen. Anyone who still holds a ref might try to issue a new request on a dead queue after the blk_cleanup_queue() finishes draining, the lock unbalance might still happen in this case. ===================================== [ BUG: bad unlock balance detected! ] 3.4.0+ #288 Not tainted ------------------------------------- fio/17706 is trying to release lock (&(&q->__queue_lock)->rlock) at: [<ffffffff81329372>] blk_queue_bio+0x2a2/0x380 but there are no more locks to release! other info that might help us debug this: 1 lock held by fio/17706: #0: (&(&vblk->lock)->rlock){......}, at: [<ffffffff81327f1a>] get_request_wait+0x19a/0x250 stack backtrace: Pid: 17706, comm: fio Not tainted 3.4.0+ #288 Call Trace: [<ffffffff81329372>] ? blk_queue_bio+0x2a2/0x380 [<ffffffff810dea49>] print_unlock_inbalance_bug+0xf9/0x100 [<ffffffff810dfe4f>] lock_release_non_nested+0x1df/0x330 [<ffffffff811dae24>] ? dio_bio_end_aio+0x34/0xc0 [<ffffffff811d6935>] ? bio_check_pages_dirty+0x85/0xe0 [<ffffffff811daea1>] ? dio_bio_end_aio+0xb1/0xc0 [<ffffffff81329372>] ? blk_queue_bio+0x2a2/0x380 [<ffffffff81329372>] ? blk_queue_bio+0x2a2/0x380 [<ffffffff810e0079>] lock_release+0xd9/0x250 [<ffffffff81a74553>] _raw_spin_unlock_irq+0x23/0x40 [<ffffffff81329372>] blk_queue_bio+0x2a2/0x380 [<ffffffff81328faa>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81329056>] submit_bio+0x76/0xf0 [<ffffffff8115470c>] ? set_page_dirty_lock+0x3c/0x60 [<ffffffff811d69e1>] ? bio_set_pages_dirty+0x51/0x70 [<ffffffff811dd1a8>] do_blockdev_direct_IO+0xbf8/0xee0 [<ffffffff811d8620>] ? blkdev_get_block+0x80/0x80 [<ffffffff811dd4e5>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x55/0x60 [<ffffffff811d8620>] ? blkdev_get_block+0x80/0x80 [<ffffffff811d92e7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff811d8620>] ? blkdev_get_block+0x80/0x80 [<ffffffff8114c6ae>] generic_file_aio_read+0x70e/0x760 [<ffffffff810df7c5>] ? __lock_acquire+0x215/0x5a0 [<ffffffff811e9924>] ? aio_run_iocb+0x54/0x1a0 [<ffffffff8114bfa0>] ? grab_cache_page_nowait+0xc0/0xc0 [<ffffffff811e82cc>] aio_rw_vect_retry+0x7c/0x1e0 [<ffffffff811e8250>] ? aio_fsync+0x30/0x30 [<ffffffff811e9936>] aio_run_iocb+0x66/0x1a0 [<ffffffff811ea9b0>] do_io_submit+0x6f0/0xb80 [<ffffffff8134de2e>] ? trace_hardirqs_on_thunk+0x3a/0x3f [<ffffffff811eae50>] sys_io_submit+0x10/0x20 [<ffffffff81a7c9e9>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b Changes since v2: Update commit log to explain how the code is still broken even if we delay the lock switching after the drain. Changes since v1: Update commit log as Tejun suggested. Acked-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Asias He <asias@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: fix request_queue lifetime handling by making blk_queue_cleanup() properly shutdown request_queue is refcounted but actually depdends on lifetime management from the queue owner - on blk_cleanup_queue(), block layer expects that there's no request passing through request_queue and no new one will. This is fundamentally broken. The queue owner (e.g. SCSI layer) doesn't have a way to know whether there are other active users before calling blk_cleanup_queue() and other users (e.g. bsg) don't have any guarantee that the queue is and would stay valid while it's holding a reference. With delay added in blk_queue_bio() before queue_lock is grabbed, the following oops can be easily triggered when a device is removed with in-flight IOs. sd 0:0:1:0: [sdb] Stopping disk ata1.01: disabled general protection fault: 0000 [#1] PREEMPT SMP CPU 2 Modules linked in: Pid: 648, comm: test_rawio Not tainted 3.1.0-rc3-work+ #56 Bochs Bochs RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8137d651>] [<ffffffff8137d651>] elv_rqhash_find+0x61/0x100 ... Process test_rawio (pid: 648, threadinfo ffff880019efa000, task ffff880019ef8a80) ... Call Trace: [<ffffffff8137d774>] elv_merge+0x84/0xe0 [<ffffffff81385b54>] blk_queue_bio+0xf4/0x400 [<ffffffff813838ea>] generic_make_request+0xca/0x100 [<ffffffff81383994>] submit_bio+0x74/0x100 [<ffffffff811c53ec>] dio_bio_submit+0xbc/0xc0 [<ffffffff811c610e>] __blockdev_direct_IO+0x92e/0xb40 [<ffffffff811c39f7>] blkdev_direct_IO+0x57/0x60 [<ffffffff8113b1c5>] generic_file_aio_read+0x6d5/0x760 [<ffffffff8118c1ca>] do_sync_read+0xda/0x120 [<ffffffff8118ce55>] vfs_read+0xc5/0x180 [<ffffffff8118cfaa>] sys_pread64+0x9a/0xb0 [<ffffffff81afaf6b>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b This happens because blk_queue_cleanup() destroys the queue and elevator whether IOs are in progress or not and DEAD tests are sprinkled in the request processing path without proper synchronization. Similar problem exists for blk-throtl. On queue cleanup, blk-throtl is shutdown whether it has requests in it or not. Depending on timing, it either oopses or throttled bios are lost putting tasks which are waiting for bio completion into eternal D state. The way it should work is having the usual clear distinction between shutdown and release. Shutdown drains all currently pending requests, marks the queue dead, and performs partial teardown of the now unnecessary part of the queue. Even after shutdown is complete, reference holders are still allowed to issue requests to the queue although they will be immmediately failed. The rest of teardown happens on release. This patch makes the following changes to make blk_queue_cleanup() behave as proper shutdown. * QUEUE_FLAG_DEAD is now set while holding both q->exit_mutex and queue_lock. * Unsynchronized DEAD check in generic_make_request_checks() removed. This couldn't make any meaningful difference as the queue could die after the check. * blk_drain_queue() updated such that it can drain all requests and is now called during cleanup. * blk_throtl updated such that it checks DEAD on grabbing queue_lock, drains all throttled bios during cleanup and free td when queue is released. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
blkcg: unify blkg's for blkcg policies Currently, blkg is per cgroup-queue-policy combination. This is unnatural and leads to various convolutions in partially used duplicate fields in blkg, config / stat access, and general management of blkgs. This patch make blkg's per cgroup-queue and let them serve all policies. blkgs are now created and destroyed by blkcg core proper. This will allow further consolidation of common management logic into blkcg core and API with better defined semantics and layering. As a transitional step to untangle blkg management, elvswitch and policy [de]registration, all blkgs except the root blkg are being shot down during elvswitch and bypass. This patch adds blkg_root_update() to update root blkg in place on policy change. This is hacky and racy but should be good enough as interim step until we get locking simplified and switch over to proper in-place update for all blkgs. -v2: Root blkgs need to be updated on elvswitch too and blkg_alloc() comment wasn't updated according to the function change. Fixed. Both pointed out by Vivek. -v3: v2 updated blkg_destroy_all() to invoke update_root_blkg_pd() for all policies. This freed root pd during elvswitch before the last queue finished exiting and led to oops. Directly invoke update_root_blkg_pd() only on BLKIO_POLICY_PROP from cfq_exit_queue(). This also is closer to what will be done with proper in-place blkg update. Reported by Vivek. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block: reimplement FLUSH/FUA to support merge The current FLUSH/FUA support has evolved from the implementation which had to perform queue draining. As such, sequencing is done queue-wide one flush request after another. However, with the draining requirement gone, there's no reason to keep the queue-wide sequential approach. This patch reimplements FLUSH/FUA support such that each FLUSH/FUA request is sequenced individually. The actual FLUSH execution is double buffered and whenever a request wants to execute one for either PRE or POSTFLUSH, it queues on the pending queue. Once certain conditions are met, a flush request is issued and on its completion all pending requests proceed to the next sequence. This allows arbitrary merging of different type of flushes. How they are merged can be primarily controlled and tuned by adjusting the above said 'conditions' used to determine when to issue the next flush. This is inspired by Darrick's patches to merge multiple zero-data flushes which helps workloads with highly concurrent fsync requests. * As flush requests are never put on the IO scheduler, request fields used for flush share space with rq->rb_node. rq->completion_data is moved out of the union. This increases the request size by one pointer. As rq->elevator_private* are used only by the iosched too, it is possible to reduce the request size further. However, to do that, we need to modify request allocation path such that iosched data is not allocated for flush requests. * FLUSH/FUA processing happens on insertion now instead of dispatch. - Comments updated as per Vivek and Mike. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: "Darrick J. Wong" <djwong@us.ibm.com> Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@kernel.org> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Mike Snitzer <snitzer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: Initialize ->queue_lock to internal lock at queue allocation time There does not seem to be a clear convention whether q->queue_lock is initialized or not when blk_cleanup_queue() is called. In the past it was not necessary but now blk_throtl_exit() takes up queue lock by default and needs queue lock to be available. In fact elevator_exit() code also has similar requirement just that it is less stringent in the sense that elevator_exit() is called only if elevator is initialized. Two problems have been noticed because of ambiguity about spin lock status. - If a driver calls blk_alloc_queue() and then soon calls blk_cleanup_queue() almost immediately, (because some other driver structure allocation failed or some other error happened) then blk_throtl_exit() will run into issues as queue lock is not initialized. Loop driver ran into this issue recently and I noticed error paths in md driver too. Similar error paths should exist in other drivers too. - If some driver provided external spin lock and zapped the lock before blk_cleanup_queue(), then it can lead to issues. So this patch initializes the default queue lock at queue allocation time. block throttling code is one of the users of queue lock and it is initialized at the queue allocation time, so it makes sense to initialize ->queue_lock also to internal lock. A driver can overide that lock later. This will take care of the issue where a driver does not have to worry about initializing the queue lock to default before calling blk_cleanup_queue() Signed-off-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block: lift the initial queue bypass mode on blk_register_queue() instead of blk_init_allocated_queue() b82d4b197c ("blkcg: make request_queue bypassing on allocation") made request_queues bypassed on allocation to avoid switching on and off bypass mode on a queue being initialized. Some drivers allocate and then destroy a lot of queues without fully initializing them and incurring bypass latency overhead on each of them could add upto significant overhead. Unfortunately, blk_init_allocated_queue() is never used by queues of bio-based drivers, which means that all bio-based driver queues are in bypass mode even after initialization and registration complete successfully. Due to the limited way request_queues are used by bio drivers, this problem is hidden pretty well but it shows up when blk-throttle is used in combination with a bio-based driver. Trying to configure (echoing to cgroupfs file) blk-throttle for a bio-based driver hangs indefinitely in blkg_conf_prep() waiting for bypass mode to end. This patch moves the initial blk_queue_bypass_end() call from blk_init_allocated_queue() to blk_register_queue() which is called for any userland-visible queues regardless of its type. I believe this is correct because I don't think there is any block driver which needs or wants working elevator and blk-cgroup on a queue which isn't visible to userland. If there are such users, we need a different solution. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Reported-by: Joseph Glanville <joseph.glanville@orionvm.com.au> Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
block: Initialize ->queue_lock to internal lock at queue allocation time There does not seem to be a clear convention whether q->queue_lock is initialized or not when blk_cleanup_queue() is called. In the past it was not necessary but now blk_throtl_exit() takes up queue lock by default and needs queue lock to be available. In fact elevator_exit() code also has similar requirement just that it is less stringent in the sense that elevator_exit() is called only if elevator is initialized. Two problems have been noticed because of ambiguity about spin lock status. - If a driver calls blk_alloc_queue() and then soon calls blk_cleanup_queue() almost immediately, (because some other driver structure allocation failed or some other error happened) then blk_throtl_exit() will run into issues as queue lock is not initialized. Loop driver ran into this issue recently and I noticed error paths in md driver too. Similar error paths should exist in other drivers too. - If some driver provided external spin lock and zapped the lock before blk_cleanup_queue(), then it can lead to issues. So this patch initializes the default queue lock at queue allocation time. block throttling code is one of the users of queue lock and it is initialized at the queue allocation time, so it makes sense to initialize ->queue_lock also to internal lock. A driver can overide that lock later. This will take care of the issue where a driver does not have to worry about initializing the queue lock to default before calling blk_cleanup_queue() Signed-off-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <jaxboe@fusionio.com>
11 years ago
block, cfq: move icq creation and rq->elv.icq association to block core Now block layer knows everything necessary to create and associate icq's with requests. Move ioc_create_icq() to blk-ioc.c and update get_request() such that, if elevator_type->icq_size is set, requests are automatically associated with their matching icq's before elv_set_request(). io_context reference is also managed by block core on request alloc/free. * Only ioprio/cgroup changed handling remains from cfq_get_cic(). Collapsed into cfq_set_request(). * This removes queue kicking on icq allocation failure (for now). As icq allocation failure is rare and the only effect of queue kicking achieved was possibily accelerating queue processing, this change shouldn't be noticeable. There is a larger underlying problem. Unlike request allocation, icq allocation is not guaranteed to succeed eventually after retries. The number of icq is unbound and thus mempool can't be the solution either. This effectively adds allocation dependency on memory free path and thus possibility of deadlock. This usually wouldn't happen because icq allocation is not a hot path and, even when the condition triggers, it's highly unlikely that none of the writeback workers already has icq. However, this is still possible especially if elevator is being switched under high memory pressure, so we better get it fixed. Probably the only solution is just bypassing elevator and appending to dispatch queue on any elevator allocation failure. * Comment added to explain how icq's are managed and synchronized. This completes cleanup of io_context interface. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block, cfq: move icq creation and rq->elv.icq association to block core Now block layer knows everything necessary to create and associate icq's with requests. Move ioc_create_icq() to blk-ioc.c and update get_request() such that, if elevator_type->icq_size is set, requests are automatically associated with their matching icq's before elv_set_request(). io_context reference is also managed by block core on request alloc/free. * Only ioprio/cgroup changed handling remains from cfq_get_cic(). Collapsed into cfq_set_request(). * This removes queue kicking on icq allocation failure (for now). As icq allocation failure is rare and the only effect of queue kicking achieved was possibily accelerating queue processing, this change shouldn't be noticeable. There is a larger underlying problem. Unlike request allocation, icq allocation is not guaranteed to succeed eventually after retries. The number of icq is unbound and thus mempool can't be the solution either. This effectively adds allocation dependency on memory free path and thus possibility of deadlock. This usually wouldn't happen because icq allocation is not a hot path and, even when the condition triggers, it's highly unlikely that none of the writeback workers already has icq. However, this is still possible especially if elevator is being switched under high memory pressure, so we better get it fixed. Probably the only solution is just bypassing elevator and appending to dispatch queue on any elevator allocation failure. * Comment added to explain how icq's are managed and synchronized. This completes cleanup of io_context interface. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block, cfq: move icq creation and rq->elv.icq association to block core Now block layer knows everything necessary to create and associate icq's with requests. Move ioc_create_icq() to blk-ioc.c and update get_request() such that, if elevator_type->icq_size is set, requests are automatically associated with their matching icq's before elv_set_request(). io_context reference is also managed by block core on request alloc/free. * Only ioprio/cgroup changed handling remains from cfq_get_cic(). Collapsed into cfq_set_request(). * This removes queue kicking on icq allocation failure (for now). As icq allocation failure is rare and the only effect of queue kicking achieved was possibily accelerating queue processing, this change shouldn't be noticeable. There is a larger underlying problem. Unlike request allocation, icq allocation is not guaranteed to succeed eventually after retries. The number of icq is unbound and thus mempool can't be the solution either. This effectively adds allocation dependency on memory free path and thus possibility of deadlock. This usually wouldn't happen because icq allocation is not a hot path and, even when the condition triggers, it's highly unlikely that none of the writeback workers already has icq. However, this is still possible especially if elevator is being switched under high memory pressure, so we better get it fixed. Probably the only solution is just bypassing elevator and appending to dispatch queue on any elevator allocation failure. * Comment added to explain how icq's are managed and synchronized. This completes cleanup of io_context interface. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
block: implement bio_associate_current() IO scheduling and cgroup are tied to the issuing task via io_context and cgroup of %current. Unfortunately, there are cases where IOs need to be routed via a different task which makes scheduling and cgroup limit enforcement applied completely incorrectly. For example, all bios delayed by blk-throttle end up being issued by a delayed work item and get assigned the io_context of the worker task which happens to serve the work item and dumped to the default block cgroup. This is double confusing as bios which aren't delayed end up in the correct cgroup and makes using blk-throttle and cfq propio together impossible. Any code which punts IO issuing to another task is affected which is getting more and more common (e.g. btrfs). As both io_context and cgroup are firmly tied to task including userland visible APIs to manipulate them, it makes a lot of sense to match up tasks to bios. This patch implements bio_associate_current() which associates the specified bio with %current. The bio will record the associated ioc and blkcg at that point and block layer will use the recorded ones regardless of which task actually ends up issuing the bio. bio release puts the associated ioc and blkcg. It grabs and remembers ioc and blkcg instead of the task itself because task may already be dead by the time the bio is issued making ioc and blkcg inaccessible and those are all block layer cares about. elevator_set_req_fn() is updated such that the bio elvdata is being allocated for is available to the elevator. This doesn't update block cgroup policies yet. Further patches will implement the support. -v2: #ifdef CONFIG_BLK_CGROUP added around bio->bi_ioc dereference in rq_ioc() to fix build breakage. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Cc: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block, cfq: move icq creation and rq->elv.icq association to block core Now block layer knows everything necessary to create and associate icq's with requests. Move ioc_create_icq() to blk-ioc.c and update get_request() such that, if elevator_type->icq_size is set, requests are automatically associated with their matching icq's before elv_set_request(). io_context reference is also managed by block core on request alloc/free. * Only ioprio/cgroup changed handling remains from cfq_get_cic(). Collapsed into cfq_set_request(). * This removes queue kicking on icq allocation failure (for now). As icq allocation failure is rare and the only effect of queue kicking achieved was possibily accelerating queue processing, this change shouldn't be noticeable. There is a larger underlying problem. Unlike request allocation, icq allocation is not guaranteed to succeed eventually after retries. The number of icq is unbound and thus mempool can't be the solution either. This effectively adds allocation dependency on memory free path and thus possibility of deadlock. This usually wouldn't happen because icq allocation is not a hot path and, even when the condition triggers, it's highly unlikely that none of the writeback workers already has icq. However, this is still possible especially if elevator is being switched under high memory pressure, so we better get it fixed. Probably the only solution is just bypassing elevator and appending to dispatch queue on any elevator allocation failure. * Comment added to explain how icq's are managed and synchronized. This completes cleanup of io_context interface. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
block, cfq: move icq creation and rq->elv.icq association to block core Now block layer knows everything necessary to create and associate icq's with requests. Move ioc_create_icq() to blk-ioc.c and update get_request() such that, if elevator_type->icq_size is set, requests are automatically associated with their matching icq's before elv_set_request(). io_context reference is also managed by block core on request alloc/free. * Only ioprio/cgroup changed handling remains from cfq_get_cic(). Collapsed into cfq_set_request(). * This removes queue kicking on icq allocation failure (for now). As icq allocation failure is rare and the only effect of queue kicking achieved was possibily accelerating queue processing, this change shouldn't be noticeable. There is a larger underlying problem. Unlike request allocation, icq allocation is not guaranteed to succeed eventually after retries. The number of icq is unbound and thus mempool can't be the solution either. This effectively adds allocation dependency on memory free path and thus possibility of deadlock. This usually wouldn't happen because icq allocation is not a hot path and, even when the condition triggers, it's highly unlikely that none of the writeback workers already has icq. However, this is still possible especially if elevator is being switched under high memory pressure, so we better get it fixed. Probably the only solution is just bypassing elevator and appending to dispatch queue on any elevator allocation failure. * Comment added to explain how icq's are managed and synchronized. This completes cleanup of io_context interface. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
block, cfq: move icq creation and rq->elv.icq association to block core Now block layer knows everything necessary to create and associate icq's with requests. Move ioc_create_icq() to blk-ioc.c and update get_request() such that, if elevator_type->icq_size is set, requests are automatically associated with their matching icq's before elv_set_request(). io_context reference is also managed by block core on request alloc/free. * Only ioprio/cgroup changed handling remains from cfq_get_cic(). Collapsed into cfq_set_request(). * This removes queue kicking on icq allocation failure (for now). As icq allocation failure is rare and the only effect of queue kicking achieved was possibily accelerating queue processing, this change shouldn't be noticeable. There is a larger underlying problem. Unlike request allocation, icq allocation is not guaranteed to succeed eventually after retries. The number of icq is unbound and thus mempool can't be the solution either. This effectively adds allocation dependency on memory free path and thus possibility of deadlock. This usually wouldn't happen because icq allocation is not a hot path and, even when the condition triggers, it's highly unlikely that none of the writeback workers already has icq. However, this is still possible especially if elevator is being switched under high memory pressure, so we better get it fixed. Probably the only solution is just bypassing elevator and appending to dispatch queue on any elevator allocation failure. * Comment added to explain how icq's are managed and synchronized. This completes cleanup of io_context interface. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
10 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago
blkcg: implement per-blkg request allocation Currently, request_queue has one request_list to allocate requests from regardless of blkcg of the IO being issued. When the unified request pool is used up, cfq proportional IO limits become meaningless - whoever grabs the next request being freed wins the race regardless of the configured weights. This can be easily demonstrated by creating a blkio cgroup w/ very low weight, put a program which can issue a lot of random direct IOs there and running a sequential IO from a different cgroup. As soon as the request pool is used up, the sequential IO bandwidth crashes. This patch implements per-blkg request_list. Each blkg has its own request_list and any IO allocates its request from the matching blkg making blkcgs completely isolated in terms of request allocation. * Root blkcg uses the request_list embedded in each request_queue, which was renamed to @q->root_rl from @q->rq. While making blkcg rl handling a bit harier, this enables avoiding most overhead for root blkcg. * Queue fullness is properly per request_list but bdi isn't blkcg aware yet, so congestion state currently just follows the root blkcg. As writeback isn't aware of blkcg yet, this works okay for async congestion but readahead may get the wrong signals. It's better than blkcg completely collapsing with shared request_list but needs to be improved with future changes. * After this change, each block cgroup gets a full request pool making resource consumption of each cgroup higher. This makes allowing non-root users to create cgroups less desirable; however, note that allowing non-root users to directly manage cgroups is already severely broken regardless of this patch - each block cgroup consumes kernel memory and skews IO weight (IO weights are not hierarchical). v2: queue-sysfs.txt updated and patch description udpated as suggested by Vivek. v3: blk_get_rl() wasn't checking error return from blkg_lookup_create() and may cause oops on lookup failure. Fix it by falling back to root_rl on blkg lookup failures. This problem was spotted by Rakesh Iyer <rni@google.com>. v4: Updated to accomodate 458f27a982 "block: Avoid missed wakeup in request waitqueue". blk_drain_queue() now wakes up waiters on all blkg->rl on the target queue. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Acked-by: Vivek Goyal <vgoyal@redhat.com> Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
9 years ago