original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
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signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
/*
* fs/timerfd.c
*
* Copyright (C) 2007 Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org>
*
*
* Thanks to Thomas Gleixner for code reviews and useful comments.
*
*/
#include <linux/file.h>
#include <linux/poll.h>
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/fs.h>
#include <linux/sched.h>
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/list.h>
#include <linux/spinlock.h>
#include <linux/time.h>
#include <linux/hrtimer.h>
#include <linux/anon_inodes.h>
#include <linux/timerfd.h>
#include <linux/syscalls.h>
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
struct timerfd_ctx {
struct hrtimer tmr;
ktime_t tintv;
wait_queue_head_t wqh;
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
u64 ticks;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
int expired;
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
int clockid;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
};
/*
* This gets called when the timer event triggers. We set the "expired"
* flag, but we do not re-arm the timer (in case it's necessary,
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
* tintv.tv64 != 0) until the timer is accessed.
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
*/
static enum hrtimer_restart timerfd_tmrproc(struct hrtimer *htmr)
{
struct timerfd_ctx *ctx = container_of(htmr, struct timerfd_ctx, tmr);
unsigned long flags;
spin_lock_irqsave(&ctx->wqh.lock, flags);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
ctx->expired = 1;
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
ctx->ticks++;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
wake_up_locked(&ctx->wqh);
spin_unlock_irqrestore(&ctx->wqh.lock, flags);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
return HRTIMER_NORESTART;
}
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
static ktime_t timerfd_get_remaining(struct timerfd_ctx *ctx)
{
ktime_t now, remaining;
now = ctx->tmr.base->get_time();
remaining = ktime_sub(ctx->tmr.expires, now);
return remaining.tv64 < 0 ? ktime_set(0, 0): remaining;
}
static void timerfd_setup(struct timerfd_ctx *ctx, int flags,
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
const struct itimerspec *ktmr)
{
enum hrtimer_mode htmode;
ktime_t texp;
htmode = (flags & TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME) ?
HRTIMER_MODE_ABS: HRTIMER_MODE_REL;
texp = timespec_to_ktime(ktmr->it_value);
ctx->expired = 0;
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
ctx->ticks = 0;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
ctx->tintv = timespec_to_ktime(ktmr->it_interval);
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
hrtimer_init(&ctx->tmr, ctx->clockid, htmode);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
ctx->tmr.expires = texp;
ctx->tmr.function = timerfd_tmrproc;
if (texp.tv64 != 0)
hrtimer_start(&ctx->tmr, texp, htmode);
}
static int timerfd_release(struct inode *inode, struct file *file)
{
struct timerfd_ctx *ctx = file->private_data;
hrtimer_cancel(&ctx->tmr);
kfree(ctx);
return 0;
}
static unsigned int timerfd_poll(struct file *file, poll_table *wait)
{
struct timerfd_ctx *ctx = file->private_data;
unsigned int events = 0;
unsigned long flags;
poll_wait(file, &ctx->wqh, wait);
spin_lock_irqsave(&ctx->wqh.lock, flags);
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
if (ctx->ticks)
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
events |= POLLIN;
spin_unlock_irqrestore(&ctx->wqh.lock, flags);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
return events;
}
static ssize_t timerfd_read(struct file *file, char __user *buf, size_t count,
loff_t *ppos)
{
struct timerfd_ctx *ctx = file->private_data;
ssize_t res;
u64 ticks = 0;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
DECLARE_WAITQUEUE(wait, current);
if (count < sizeof(ticks))
return -EINVAL;
spin_lock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
res = -EAGAIN;
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
if (!ctx->ticks && !(file->f_flags & O_NONBLOCK)) {
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
__add_wait_queue(&ctx->wqh, &wait);
for (res = 0;;) {
set_current_state(TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE);
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
if (ctx->ticks) {
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
res = 0;
break;
}
if (signal_pending(current)) {
res = -ERESTARTSYS;
break;
}
spin_unlock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
schedule();
spin_lock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
}
__remove_wait_queue(&ctx->wqh, &wait);
__set_current_state(TASK_RUNNING);
}
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
if (ctx->ticks) {
ticks = ctx->ticks;
if (ctx->expired && ctx->tintv.tv64) {
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
/*
* If tintv.tv64 != 0, this is a periodic timer that
* needs to be re-armed. We avoid doing it in the timer
* callback to avoid DoS attacks specifying a very
* short timer period.
*/
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
ticks += hrtimer_forward_now(&ctx->tmr,
ctx->tintv) - 1;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
hrtimer_restart(&ctx->tmr);
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
}
ctx->expired = 0;
ctx->ticks = 0;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
}
spin_unlock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
if (ticks)
res = put_user(ticks, (u64 __user *) buf) ? -EFAULT: sizeof(ticks);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
return res;
}
static const struct file_operations timerfd_fops = {
.release = timerfd_release,
.poll = timerfd_poll,
.read = timerfd_read,
};
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
static struct file *timerfd_fget(int fd)
{
struct file *file;
file = fget(fd);
if (!file)
return ERR_PTR(-EBADF);
if (file->f_op != &timerfd_fops) {
fput(file);
return ERR_PTR(-EINVAL);
}
return file;
}
asmlinkage long sys_timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags)
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
{
int ufd;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
struct timerfd_ctx *ctx;
flag parameters: timerfd_create The timerfd_create syscall already has a flags parameter. It just is unused so far. This patch changes this by introducing the TFD_CLOEXEC flag to set the close-on-exec flag for the returned file descriptor. A new name TFD_CLOEXEC is introduced which in this implementation must have the same value as O_CLOEXEC. The following test must be adjusted for architectures other than x86 and x86-64 and in case the syscall numbers changed. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #include <fcntl.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <time.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/syscall.h> #ifndef __NR_timerfd_create # ifdef __x86_64__ # define __NR_timerfd_create 283 # elif defined __i386__ # define __NR_timerfd_create 322 # else # error "need __NR_timerfd_create" # endif #endif #define TFD_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC int main (void) { int fd = syscall (__NR_timerfd_create, CLOCK_REALTIME, 0); if (fd == -1) { puts ("timerfd_create(0) failed"); return 1; } int coe = fcntl (fd, F_GETFD); if (coe == -1) { puts ("fcntl failed"); return 1; } if (coe & FD_CLOEXEC) { puts ("timerfd_create(0) set close-on-exec flag"); return 1; } close (fd); fd = syscall (__NR_timerfd_create, CLOCK_REALTIME, TFD_CLOEXEC); if (fd == -1) { puts ("timerfd_create(TFD_CLOEXEC) failed"); return 1; } coe = fcntl (fd, F_GETFD); if (coe == -1) { puts ("fcntl failed"); return 1; } if ((coe & FD_CLOEXEC) == 0) { puts ("timerfd_create(TFD_CLOEXEC) set close-on-exec flag"); return 1; } close (fd); puts ("OK"); return 0; } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Acked-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@googlemail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
if (flags & ~TFD_CLOEXEC)
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
return -EINVAL;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
if (clockid != CLOCK_MONOTONIC &&
clockid != CLOCK_REALTIME)
return -EINVAL;
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
ctx = kzalloc(sizeof(*ctx), GFP_KERNEL);
if (!ctx)
return -ENOMEM;
init_waitqueue_head(&ctx->wqh);
ctx->clockid = clockid;
hrtimer_init(&ctx->tmr, clockid, HRTIMER_MODE_ABS);
flag parameters: timerfd_create The timerfd_create syscall already has a flags parameter. It just is unused so far. This patch changes this by introducing the TFD_CLOEXEC flag to set the close-on-exec flag for the returned file descriptor. A new name TFD_CLOEXEC is introduced which in this implementation must have the same value as O_CLOEXEC. The following test must be adjusted for architectures other than x86 and x86-64 and in case the syscall numbers changed. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #include <fcntl.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <time.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/syscall.h> #ifndef __NR_timerfd_create # ifdef __x86_64__ # define __NR_timerfd_create 283 # elif defined __i386__ # define __NR_timerfd_create 322 # else # error "need __NR_timerfd_create" # endif #endif #define TFD_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC int main (void) { int fd = syscall (__NR_timerfd_create, CLOCK_REALTIME, 0); if (fd == -1) { puts ("timerfd_create(0) failed"); return 1; } int coe = fcntl (fd, F_GETFD); if (coe == -1) { puts ("fcntl failed"); return 1; } if (coe & FD_CLOEXEC) { puts ("timerfd_create(0) set close-on-exec flag"); return 1; } close (fd); fd = syscall (__NR_timerfd_create, CLOCK_REALTIME, TFD_CLOEXEC); if (fd == -1) { puts ("timerfd_create(TFD_CLOEXEC) failed"); return 1; } coe = fcntl (fd, F_GETFD); if (coe == -1) { puts ("fcntl failed"); return 1; } if ((coe & FD_CLOEXEC) == 0) { puts ("timerfd_create(TFD_CLOEXEC) set close-on-exec flag"); return 1; } close (fd); puts ("OK"); return 0; } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Acked-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@googlemail.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
ufd = anon_inode_getfd("[timerfd]", &timerfd_fops, ctx,
flags & O_CLOEXEC);
if (ufd < 0)
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
kfree(ctx);
return ufd;
}
asmlinkage long sys_timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags,
const struct itimerspec __user *utmr,
struct itimerspec __user *otmr)
{
struct file *file;
struct timerfd_ctx *ctx;
struct itimerspec ktmr, kotmr;
if (copy_from_user(&ktmr, utmr, sizeof(ktmr)))
return -EFAULT;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
if (!timespec_valid(&ktmr.it_value) ||
!timespec_valid(&ktmr.it_interval))
return -EINVAL;
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
file = timerfd_fget(ufd);
if (IS_ERR(file))
return PTR_ERR(file);
ctx = file->private_data;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
/*
* We need to stop the existing timer before reprogramming
* it to the new values.
*/
for (;;) {
spin_lock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
if (hrtimer_try_to_cancel(&ctx->tmr) >= 0)
break;
spin_unlock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
cpu_relax();
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
}
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
/*
* If the timer is expired and it's periodic, we need to advance it
* because the caller may want to know the previous expiration time.
* We do not update "ticks" and "expired" since the timer will be
* re-programmed again in the following timerfd_setup() call.
*/
if (ctx->expired && ctx->tintv.tv64)
hrtimer_forward_now(&ctx->tmr, ctx->tintv);
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
timerfd: new timerfd API This is the new timerfd API as it is implemented by the following patch: int timerfd_create(int clockid, int flags); int timerfd_settime(int ufd, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr, struct itimerspec *otmr); int timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec *otmr); The timerfd_create() API creates an un-programmed timerfd fd. The "clockid" parameter can be either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The timerfd_settime() API give new settings by the timerfd fd, by optionally retrieving the previous expiration time (in case the "otmr" parameter is not NULL). The time value specified in "utmr" is absolute, if the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME bit is set in the "flags" parameter. Otherwise it's a relative time. The timerfd_gettime() API returns the next expiration time of the timer, or {0, 0} if the timerfd has not been set yet. Like the previous timerfd API implementation, read(2) and poll(2) are supported (with the same interface). Here's a simple test program I used to exercise the new timerfd APIs: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test2.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style cleanups] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix ia64 build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix m68k build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix mips build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix alpha, arm, blackfin, cris, m68k, s390, sparc and sparc64 builds] [heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com: fix s390] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix powerpc build] [akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix sparc64 more] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com> Cc: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago
kotmr.it_value = ktime_to_timespec(timerfd_get_remaining(ctx));
kotmr.it_interval = ktime_to_timespec(ctx->tintv);
/*
* Re-program the timer to the new value ...
*/
timerfd_setup(ctx, flags, &ktmr);
spin_unlock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
fput(file);
if (otmr && copy_to_user(otmr, &kotmr, sizeof(kotmr)))
return -EFAULT;
return 0;
}
asmlinkage long sys_timerfd_gettime(int ufd, struct itimerspec __user *otmr)
{
struct file *file;
struct timerfd_ctx *ctx;
struct itimerspec kotmr;
file = timerfd_fget(ufd);
if (IS_ERR(file))
return PTR_ERR(file);
ctx = file->private_data;
spin_lock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
if (ctx->expired && ctx->tintv.tv64) {
ctx->expired = 0;
ctx->ticks +=
hrtimer_forward_now(&ctx->tmr, ctx->tintv) - 1;
hrtimer_restart(&ctx->tmr);
}
kotmr.it_value = ktime_to_timespec(timerfd_get_remaining(ctx));
kotmr.it_interval = ktime_to_timespec(ctx->tintv);
spin_unlock_irq(&ctx->wqh.lock);
fput(file);
return copy_to_user(otmr, &kotmr, sizeof(kotmr)) ? -EFAULT: 0;
signal/timer/event: timerfd core This patch introduces a new system call for timers events delivered though file descriptors. This allows timer event to be used with standard POSIX poll(2), select(2) and read(2). As a consequence of supporting the Linux f_op->poll subsystem, they can be used with epoll(2) too. The system call is defined as: int timerfd(int ufd, int clockid, int flags, const struct itimerspec *utmr); The "ufd" parameter allows for re-use (re-programming) of an existing timerfd w/out going through the close/open cycle (same as signalfd). If "ufd" is -1, s new file descriptor will be created, otherwise the existing "ufd" will be re-programmed. The "clockid" parameter is either CLOCK_MONOTONIC or CLOCK_REALTIME. The time specified in the "utmr->it_value" parameter is the expiry time for the timer. If the TFD_TIMER_ABSTIME flag is set in "flags", this is an absolute time, otherwise it's a relative time. If the time specified in the "utmr->it_interval" is not zero (.tv_sec == 0, tv_nsec == 0), this is the period at which the following ticks should be generated. The "utmr->it_interval" should be set to zero if only one tick is requested. Setting the "utmr->it_value" to zero will disable the timer, or will create a timerfd without the timer enabled. The function returns the new (or same, in case "ufd" is a valid timerfd descriptor) file, or -1 in case of error. As stated before, the timerfd file descriptor supports poll(2), select(2) and epoll(2). When a timer event happened on the timerfd, a POLLIN mask will be returned. The read(2) call can be used, and it will return a u32 variable holding the number of "ticks" that happened on the interface since the last call to read(2). The read(2) call supportes the O_NONBLOCK flag too, and EAGAIN will be returned if no ticks happened. A quick test program, shows timerfd working correctly on my amd64 box: http://www.xmailserver.org/timerfd-test.c [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add sys_timerfd to sys_ni.c] Signed-off-by: Davide Libenzi <davidel@xmailserver.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
}