original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
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include cleanup: Update gfp.h and slab.h includes to prepare for breaking implicit slab.h inclusion from percpu.h percpu.h is included by sched.h and module.h and thus ends up being included when building most .c files. percpu.h includes slab.h which in turn includes gfp.h making everything defined by the two files universally available and complicating inclusion dependencies. percpu.h -> slab.h dependency is about to be removed. Prepare for this change by updating users of gfp and slab facilities include those headers directly instead of assuming availability. As this conversion needs to touch large number of source files, the following script is used as the basis of conversion. http://userweb.kernel.org/~tj/misc/slabh-sweep.py The script does the followings. * Scan files for gfp and slab usages and update includes such that only the necessary includes are there. ie. if only gfp is used, gfp.h, if slab is used, slab.h. * When the script inserts a new include, it looks at the include blocks and try to put the new include such that its order conforms to its surrounding. It's put in the include block which contains core kernel includes, in the same order that the rest are ordered - alphabetical, Christmas tree, rev-Xmas-tree or at the end if there doesn't seem to be any matching order. * If the script can't find a place to put a new include (mostly because the file doesn't have fitting include block), it prints out an error message indicating which .h file needs to be added to the file. The conversion was done in the following steps. 1. The initial automatic conversion of all .c files updated slightly over 4000 files, deleting around 700 includes and adding ~480 gfp.h and ~3000 slab.h inclusions. The script emitted errors for ~400 files. 2. Each error was manually checked. Some didn't need the inclusion, some needed manual addition while adding it to implementation .h or embedding .c file was more appropriate for others. This step added inclusions to around 150 files. 3. The script was run again and the output was compared to the edits from #2 to make sure no file was left behind. 4. Several build tests were done and a couple of problems were fixed. e.g. lib/decompress_*.c used malloc/free() wrappers around slab APIs requiring slab.h to be added manually. 5. The script was run on all .h files but without automatically editing them as sprinkling gfp.h and slab.h inclusions around .h files could easily lead to inclusion dependency hell. Most gfp.h inclusion directives were ignored as stuff from gfp.h was usually wildly available and often used in preprocessor macros. Each slab.h inclusion directive was examined and added manually as necessary. 6. percpu.h was updated not to include slab.h. 7. Build test were done on the following configurations and failures were fixed. CONFIG_GCOV_KERNEL was turned off for all tests (as my distributed build env didn't work with gcov compiles) and a few more options had to be turned off depending on archs to make things build (like ipr on powerpc/64 which failed due to missing writeq). * x86 and x86_64 UP and SMP allmodconfig and a custom test config. * powerpc and powerpc64 SMP allmodconfig * sparc and sparc64 SMP allmodconfig * ia64 SMP allmodconfig * s390 SMP allmodconfig * alpha SMP allmodconfig * um on x86_64 SMP allmodconfig 8. percpu.h modifications were reverted so that it could be applied as a separate patch and serve as bisection point. Given the fact that I had only a couple of failures from tests on step 6, I'm fairly confident about the coverage of this conversion patch. If there is a breakage, it's likely to be something in one of the arch headers which should be easily discoverable easily on most builds of the specific arch. Signed-off-by: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org> Guess-its-ok-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com> Cc: Lee Schermerhorn <Lee.Schermerhorn@hp.com>
12 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
utimensat implementation Implement utimensat(2) which is an extension to futimesat(2) in that it a) supports nano-second resolution for the timestamps b) allows to selectively ignore the atime/mtime value c) allows to selectively use the current time for either atime or mtime d) supports changing the atime/mtime of a symlink itself along the lines of the BSD lutimes(3) functions For this change the internally used do_utimes() functions was changed to accept a timespec time value and an additional flags parameter. Additionally the sys_utime function was changed to match compat_sys_utime which already use do_utimes instead of duplicating the work. Also, the completely missing futimensat() functionality is added. We have such a function in glibc but we have to resort to using /proc/self/fd/* which not everybody likes (chroot etc). Test application (the syscall number will need per-arch editing): #include <errno.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/time.h> #include <stddef.h> #include <syscall.h> #define __NR_utimensat 280 #define UTIME_NOW ((1l << 30) - 1l) #define UTIME_OMIT ((1l << 30) - 2l) int main(void) { int status = 0; int fd = open("ttt", O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL, 0666); if (fd == -1) error (1, errno, "failed to create test file \"ttt\""); struct stat64 st1; if (fstat64 (fd, &st1) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timespec t[2]; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); struct stat64 st2; if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0] = st1.st_atim; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("atim not set"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim changed from zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_OMIT; t[1] = st1.st_mtim; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != st1.st_atim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim changed from original time"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != st1.st_mtim.tv_nsec) { puts ("mtim not set"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; sleep (2); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = UTIME_NOW; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "ttt", t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,NULL); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec <= st1.st_atim.tv_sec || st2.st_atim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("atim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec <= st1.st_mtim.tv_sec || st2.st_mtim.tv_sec > tv.tv_sec) { puts ("mtim not set to NOW"); status = 1; } if (symlink ("ttt", "tttsym") != 0) error (1, errno, "cannot create symlink"); t[0].tv_sec = 0; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 0; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, AT_FDCWD, "tttsym", t, AT_SYMLINK_NOFOLLOW) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (lstat64 ("tttsym", &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "lstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink atim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 0 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("symlink mtim not reset to zero"); status = 1; } if (status != 0) goto out; t[0].tv_sec = 1; t[0].tv_nsec = 0; t[1].tv_sec = 1; t[1].tv_nsec = 0; if (syscall(__NR_utimensat, fd, NULL, t, 0) != 0) error (1, errno, "utimensat failed"); if (fstat64 (fd, &st2) != 0) error (1, errno, "fstat failed"); if (st2.st_atim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_atim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("atim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (st2.st_mtim.tv_sec != 1 || st2.st_mtim.tv_nsec != 0) { puts ("mtim not reset to one"); status = 1; } if (status == 0) puts ("all OK"); out: close (fd); unlink ("ttt"); unlink ("tttsym"); return status; } [akpm@linux-foundation.org: add missing i386 syscall table entry] Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@openvz.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
Fix: compat_rw_copy_check_uvector() misuse in aio, readv, writev, and security keys Looking at mm/process_vm_access.c:process_vm_rw() and comparing it to compat_process_vm_rw() shows that the compatibility code requires an explicit "access_ok()" check before calling compat_rw_copy_check_uvector(). The same difference seems to appear when we compare fs/read_write.c:do_readv_writev() to fs/compat.c:compat_do_readv_writev(). This subtle difference between the compat and non-compat requirements should probably be debated, as it seems to be error-prone. In fact, there are two others sites that use this function in the Linux kernel, and they both seem to get it wrong: Now shifting our attention to fs/aio.c, we see that aio_setup_iocb() also ends up calling compat_rw_copy_check_uvector() through aio_setup_vectored_rw(). Unfortunately, the access_ok() check appears to be missing. Same situation for security/keys/compat.c:compat_keyctl_instantiate_key_iov(). I propose that we add the access_ok() check directly into compat_rw_copy_check_uvector(), so callers don't have to worry about it, and it therefore makes the compat call code similar to its non-compat counterpart. Place the access_ok() check in the same location where copy_from_user() can trigger a -EFAULT error in the non-compat code, so the ABI behaviors are alike on both compat and non-compat. While we are here, fix compat_do_readv_writev() so it checks for compat_rw_copy_check_uvector() negative return values. And also, fix a memory leak in compat_keyctl_instantiate_key_iov() error handling. Acked-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Acked-by: Al Viro <viro@ZenIV.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Mathieu Desnoyers <mathieu.desnoyers@efficios.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
Cross Memory Attach The basic idea behind cross memory attach is to allow MPI programs doing intra-node communication to do a single copy of the message rather than a double copy of the message via shared memory. The following patch attempts to achieve this by allowing a destination process, given an address and size from a source process, to copy memory directly from the source process into its own address space via a system call. There is also a symmetrical ability to copy from the current process's address space into a destination process's address space. - Use of /proc/pid/mem has been considered, but there are issues with using it: - Does not allow for specifying iovecs for both src and dest, assuming preadv or pwritev was implemented either the area read from or written to would need to be contiguous. - Currently mem_read allows only processes who are currently ptrace'ing the target and are still able to ptrace the target to read from the target. This check could possibly be moved to the open call, but its not clear exactly what race this restriction is stopping (reason appears to have been lost) - Having to send the fd of /proc/self/mem via SCM_RIGHTS on unix domain socket is a bit ugly from a userspace point of view, especially when you may have hundreds if not (eventually) thousands of processes that all need to do this with each other - Doesn't allow for some future use of the interface we would like to consider adding in the future (see below) - Interestingly reading from /proc/pid/mem currently actually involves two copies! (But this could be fixed pretty easily) As mentioned previously use of vmsplice instead was considered, but has problems. Since you need the reader and writer working co-operatively if the pipe is not drained then you block. Which requires some wrapping to do non blocking on the send side or polling on the receive. In all to all communication it requires ordering otherwise you can deadlock. And in the example of many MPI tasks writing to one MPI task vmsplice serialises the copying. There are some cases of MPI collectives where even a single copy interface does not get us the performance gain we could. For example in an MPI_Reduce rather than copy the data from the source we would like to instead use it directly in a mathops (say the reduce is doing a sum) as this would save us doing a copy. We don't need to keep a copy of the data from the source. I haven't implemented this, but I think this interface could in the future do all this through the use of the flags - eg could specify the math operation and type and the kernel rather than just copying the data would apply the specified operation between the source and destination and store it in the destination. Although we don't have a "second user" of the interface (though I've had some nibbles from people who may be interested in using it for intra process messaging which is not MPI). This interface is something which hardware vendors are already doing for their custom drivers to implement fast local communication. And so in addition to this being useful for OpenMPI it would mean the driver maintainers don't have to fix things up when the mm changes. There was some discussion about how much faster a true zero copy would go. Here's a link back to the email with some testing I did on that: http://marc.info/?l=linux-mm&m=130105930902915&w=2 There is a basic man page for the proposed interface here: http://ozlabs.org/~cyeoh/cma/process_vm_readv.txt This has been implemented for x86 and powerpc, other architecture should mainly (I think) just need to add syscall numbers for the process_vm_readv and process_vm_writev. There are 32 bit compatibility versions for 64-bit kernels. For arch maintainers there are some simple tests to be able to quickly verify that the syscalls are working correctly here: http://ozlabs.org/~cyeoh/cma/cma-test-20110718.tgz Signed-off-by: Chris Yeoh <yeohc@au1.ibm.com> Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: <linux-man@vger.kernel.org> Cc: <linux-arch@vger.kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
10 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] VFS: Make filldir_t and struct kstat deal in 64-bit inode numbers These patches make the kernel pass 64-bit inode numbers internally when communicating to userspace, even on a 32-bit system. They are required because some filesystems have intrinsic 64-bit inode numbers: NFS3+ and XFS for example. The 64-bit inode numbers are then propagated to userspace automatically where the arch supports it. Problems have been seen with userspace (eg: ld.so) using the 64-bit inode number returned by stat64() or getdents64() to differentiate files, and failing because the 64-bit inode number space was compressed to 32-bits, and so overlaps occur. This patch: Make filldir_t take a 64-bit inode number and struct kstat carry a 64-bit inode number so that 64-bit inode numbers can be passed back to userspace. The stat functions then returns the full 64-bit inode number where available and where possible. If it is not possible to represent the inode number supplied by the filesystem in the field provided by userspace, then error EOVERFLOW will be issued. Similarly, the getdents/readdir functions now pass the full 64-bit inode number to userspace where possible, returning EOVERFLOW instead when a directory entry is encountered that can't be properly represented. Note that this means that some inodes will not be stat'able on a 32-bit system with old libraries where they were before - but it does mean that there will be no ambiguity over what a 32-bit inode number refers to. Note similarly that directory scans may be cut short with an error on a 32-bit system with old libraries where the scan would work before for the same reasons. It is judged unlikely that this situation will occur because modern glibc uses 64-bit capable versions of stat and getdents class functions exclusively, and that older systems are unlikely to encounter unrepresentable inode numbers anyway. [akpm: alpha build fix] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
15 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] vfs: *at functions: core Here is a series of patches which introduce in total 13 new system calls which take a file descriptor/filename pair instead of a single file name. These functions, openat etc, have been discussed on numerous occasions. They are needed to implement race-free filesystem traversal, they are necessary to implement a virtual per-thread current working directory (think multi-threaded backup software), etc. We have in glibc today implementations of the interfaces which use the /proc/self/fd magic. But this code is rather expensive. Here are some results (similar to what Jim Meyering posted before). The test creates a deep directory hierarchy on a tmpfs filesystem. Then rm -fr is used to remove all directories. Without syscall support I get this: real 0m31.921s user 0m0.688s sys 0m31.234s With syscall support the results are much better: real 0m20.699s user 0m0.536s sys 0m20.149s The interfaces are for obvious reasons currently not much used. But they'll be used. coreutils (and Jeff's posixutils) are already using them. Furthermore, code like ftw/fts in libc (maybe even glob) will also start using them. I expect a patch to make follow soon. Every program which is walking the filesystem tree will benefit. Signed-off-by: Ulrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Cc: Al Viro <viro@ftp.linux.org.uk> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
[PATCH] Add pselect/ppoll system call implementation The following implementation of ppoll() and pselect() system calls depends on the architecture providing a TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag in the thread_info. These system calls have to change the signal mask during their operation, and signal handlers must be invoked using the new, temporary signal mask. The old signal mask must be restored either upon successful exit from the system call, or upon returning from the invoked signal handler if the system call is interrupted. We can't simply restore the original signal mask and return to userspace, since the restored signal mask may actually block the signal which interrupted the system call. The TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK flag deals with this by causing the syscall exit path to trap into do_signal() just as TIF_SIGPENDING does, and by causing do_signal() to use the saved signal mask instead of the current signal mask when setting up the stack frame for the signal handler -- or by causing do_signal() to simply restore the saved signal mask in the case where there is no handler to be invoked. The first patch implements the sys_pselect() and sys_ppoll() system calls, which are present only if TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK is defined. That #ifdef should go away in time when all architectures have implemented it. The second patch implements TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for the PowerPC kernel (in the -mm tree), and the third patch then removes the arch-specific implementations of sys_rt_sigsuspend() and replaces them with generic versions using the same trick. The fourth and fifth patches, provided by David Howells, implement TIF_RESTORE_SIGMASK for FR-V and i386 respectively, and the sixth patch adds the syscalls to the i386 syscall table. This patch: Add the pselect() and ppoll() system calls, providing core routines usable by the original select() and poll() system calls and also the new calls (with their semantics w.r.t timeouts). Signed-off-by: David Woodhouse <dwmw2@infradead.org> Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk-manpages@gmx.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
16 years ago
  1. /*
  2. * linux/fs/compat.c
  3. *
  4. * Kernel compatibililty routines for e.g. 32 bit syscall support
  5. * on 64 bit kernels.
  6. *
  7. * Copyright (C) 2002 Stephen Rothwell, IBM Corporation
  8. * Copyright (C) 1997-2000 Jakub Jelinek (jakub@redhat.com)
  9. * Copyright (C) 1998 Eddie C. Dost (ecd@skynet.be)
  10. * Copyright (C) 2001,2002 Andi Kleen, SuSE Labs
  11. * Copyright (C) 2003 Pavel Machek (pavel@ucw.cz)
  12. *
  13. * This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
  14. * it under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 as
  15. * published by the Free Software Foundation.
  16. */
  17. #include <linux/stddef.h>
  18. #include <linux/kernel.h>
  19. #include <linux/linkage.h>
  20. #include <linux/compat.h>
  21. #include <linux/errno.h>
  22. #include <linux/time.h>
  23. #include <linux/fs.h>
  24. #include <linux/fcntl.h>
  25. #include <linux/namei.h>
  26. #include <linux/file.h>
  27. #include <linux/fdtable.h>
  28. #include <linux/vfs.h>
  29. #include <linux/ioctl.h>
  30. #include <linux/init.h>
  31. #include <linux/ncp_mount.h>
  32. #include <linux/nfs4_mount.h>
  33. #include <linux/syscalls.h>
  34. #include <linux/ctype.h>
  35. #include <linux/dirent.h>
  36. #include <linux/fsnotify.h>
  37. #include <linux/highuid.h>
  38. #include <linux/personality.h>
  39. #include <linux/rwsem.h>
  40. #include <linux/tsacct_kern.h>
  41. #include <linux/security.h>
  42. #include <linux/highmem.h>
  43. #include <linux/signal.h>
  44. #include <linux/poll.h>
  45. #include <linux/mm.h>
  46. #include <linux/fs_struct.h>
  47. #include <linux/slab.h>
  48. #include <linux/pagemap.h>
  49. #include <linux/aio.h>
  50. #include <asm/uaccess.h>
  51. #include <asm/mmu_context.h>
  52. #include <asm/ioctls.h>
  53. #include "internal.h"
  54. int compat_log = 1;
  55. int compat_printk(const char *fmt, ...)
  56. {
  57. va_list ap;
  58. int ret;
  59. if (!compat_log)
  60. return 0;
  61. va_start(ap, fmt);
  62. ret = vprintk(fmt, ap);
  63. va_end(ap);
  64. return ret;
  65. }
  66. /*
  67. * Not all architectures have sys_utime, so implement this in terms
  68. * of sys_utimes.
  69. */
  70. asmlinkage long compat_sys_utime(const char __user *filename,
  71. struct compat_utimbuf __user *t)
  72. {
  73. struct timespec tv[2];
  74. if (t) {
  75. if (get_user(tv[0].tv_sec, &t->actime) ||
  76. get_user(tv[1].tv_sec, &t->modtime))
  77. return -EFAULT;
  78. tv[0].tv_nsec = 0;
  79. tv[1].tv_nsec = 0;
  80. }
  81. return do_utimes(AT_FDCWD, filename, t ? tv : NULL, 0);
  82. }
  83. asmlinkage long compat_sys_utimensat(unsigned int dfd, const char __user *filename, struct compat_timespec __user *t, int flags)
  84. {
  85. struct timespec tv[2];
  86. if (t) {
  87. if (get_compat_timespec(&tv[0], &t[0]) ||
  88. get_compat_timespec(&tv[1], &t[1]))
  89. return -EFAULT;
  90. if (tv[0].tv_nsec == UTIME_OMIT && tv[1].tv_nsec == UTIME_OMIT)
  91. return 0;
  92. }
  93. return do_utimes(dfd, filename, t ? tv : NULL, flags);
  94. }
  95. asmlinkage long compat_sys_futimesat(unsigned int dfd, const char __user *filename, struct compat_timeval __user *t)
  96. {
  97. struct timespec tv[2];
  98. if (t) {
  99. if (get_user(tv[0].tv_sec, &t[0].tv_sec) ||
  100. get_user(tv[0].tv_nsec, &t[0].tv_usec) ||
  101. get_user(tv[1].tv_sec, &t[1].tv_sec) ||
  102. get_user(tv[1].tv_nsec, &t[1].tv_usec))
  103. return -EFAULT;
  104. if (tv[0].tv_nsec >= 1000000 || tv[0].tv_nsec < 0 ||
  105. tv[1].tv_nsec >= 1000000 || tv[1].tv_nsec < 0)
  106. return -EINVAL;
  107. tv[0].tv_nsec *= 1000;
  108. tv[1].tv_nsec *= 1000;
  109. }
  110. return do_utimes(dfd, filename, t ? tv : NULL, 0);
  111. }
  112. asmlinkage long compat_sys_utimes(const char __user *filename, struct compat_timeval __user *t)
  113. {
  114. return compat_sys_futimesat(AT_FDCWD, filename, t);
  115. }
  116. static int cp_compat_stat(struct kstat *stat, struct compat_stat __user *ubuf)
  117. {
  118. struct compat_stat tmp;
  119. if (!old_valid_dev(stat->dev) || !old_valid_dev(stat->rdev))
  120. return -EOVERFLOW;
  121. memset(&tmp, 0, sizeof(tmp));
  122. tmp.st_dev = old_encode_dev(stat->dev);
  123. tmp.st_ino = stat->ino;
  124. if (sizeof(tmp.st_ino) < sizeof(stat->ino) && tmp.st_ino != stat->ino)
  125. return -EOVERFLOW;
  126. tmp.st_mode = stat->mode;
  127. tmp.st_nlink = stat->nlink;
  128. if (tmp.st_nlink != stat->nlink)
  129. return -EOVERFLOW;
  130. SET_UID(tmp.st_uid, from_kuid_munged(current_user_ns(), stat->uid));
  131. SET_GID(tmp.st_gid, from_kgid_munged(current_user_ns(), stat->gid));
  132. tmp.st_rdev = old_encode_dev(stat->rdev);
  133. if ((u64) stat->size > MAX_NON_LFS)
  134. return -EOVERFLOW;
  135. tmp.st_size = stat->size;
  136. tmp.st_atime = stat->atime.tv_sec;
  137. tmp.st_atime_nsec = stat->atime.tv_nsec;
  138. tmp.st_mtime = stat->mtime.tv_sec;
  139. tmp.st_mtime_nsec = stat->mtime.tv_nsec;
  140. tmp.st_ctime = stat->ctime.tv_sec;
  141. tmp.st_ctime_nsec = stat->ctime.tv_nsec;
  142. tmp.st_blocks = stat->blocks;
  143. tmp.st_blksize = stat->blksize;
  144. return copy_to_user(ubuf, &tmp, sizeof(tmp)) ? -EFAULT : 0;
  145. }
  146. asmlinkage long compat_sys_newstat(const char __user * filename,
  147. struct compat_stat __user *statbuf)
  148. {
  149. struct kstat stat;
  150. int error;
  151. error = vfs_stat(filename, &stat);
  152. if (error)
  153. return error;
  154. return cp_compat_stat(&stat, statbuf);
  155. }
  156. asmlinkage long compat_sys_newlstat(const char __user * filename,
  157. struct compat_stat __user *statbuf)
  158. {
  159. struct kstat stat;
  160. int error;
  161. error = vfs_lstat(filename, &stat);
  162. if (error)
  163. return error;
  164. return cp_compat_stat(&stat, statbuf);
  165. }
  166. #ifndef __ARCH_WANT_STAT64
  167. asmlinkage long compat_sys_newfstatat(unsigned int dfd,
  168. const char __user *filename,
  169. struct compat_stat __user *statbuf, int flag)
  170. {
  171. struct kstat stat;
  172. int error;
  173. error = vfs_fstatat(dfd, filename, &stat, flag);
  174. if (error)
  175. return error;
  176. return cp_compat_stat(&stat, statbuf);
  177. }
  178. #endif
  179. asmlinkage long compat_sys_newfstat(unsigned int fd,
  180. struct compat_stat __user * statbuf)
  181. {
  182. struct kstat stat;
  183. int error = vfs_fstat(fd, &stat);
  184. if (!error)
  185. error = cp_compat_stat(&stat, statbuf);
  186. return error;
  187. }
  188. static int put_compat_statfs(struct compat_statfs __user *ubuf, struct kstatfs *kbuf)
  189. {
  190. if (sizeof ubuf->f_blocks == 4) {
  191. if ((kbuf->f_blocks | kbuf->f_bfree | kbuf->f_bavail |
  192. kbuf->f_bsize | kbuf->f_frsize) & 0xffffffff00000000ULL)
  193. return -EOVERFLOW;
  194. /* f_files and f_ffree may be -1; it's okay
  195. * to stuff that into 32 bits */
  196. if (kbuf->f_files != 0xffffffffffffffffULL
  197. && (kbuf->f_files & 0xffffffff00000000ULL))
  198. return -EOVERFLOW;
  199. if (kbuf->f_ffree != 0xffffffffffffffffULL
  200. && (kbuf->f_ffree & 0xffffffff00000000ULL))
  201. return -EOVERFLOW;
  202. }
  203. if (!access_ok(VERIFY_WRITE, ubuf, sizeof(*ubuf)) ||
  204. __put_user(kbuf->f_type, &ubuf->f_type) ||
  205. __put_user(kbuf->f_bsize, &ubuf->f_bsize) ||
  206. __put_user(kbuf->f_blocks, &ubuf->f_blocks) ||
  207. __put_user(kbuf->f_bfree, &ubuf->f_bfree) ||
  208. __put_user(kbuf->f_bavail, &ubuf->f_bavail) ||
  209. __put_user(kbuf->f_files, &ubuf->f_files) ||
  210. __put_user(kbuf->f_ffree, &ubuf->f_ffree) ||
  211. __put_user(kbuf->f_namelen, &ubuf->f_namelen) ||
  212. __put_user(kbuf->f_fsid.val[0], &ubuf->f_fsid.val[0]) ||
  213. __put_user(kbuf->f_fsid.val[1], &ubuf->f_fsid.val[1]) ||
  214. __put_user(kbuf->f_frsize, &ubuf->f_frsize) ||
  215. __put_user(kbuf->f_flags, &ubuf->f_flags) ||
  216. __clear_user(ubuf->f_spare, sizeof(ubuf->f_spare)))
  217. return -EFAULT;
  218. return 0;
  219. }
  220. /*
  221. * The following statfs calls are copies of code from fs/statfs.c and
  222. * should be checked against those from time to time
  223. */
  224. asmlinkage long compat_sys_statfs(const char __user *pathname, struct compat_statfs __user *buf)
  225. {
  226. struct kstatfs tmp;
  227. int error = user_statfs(pathname, &tmp);
  228. if (!error)
  229. error = put_compat_statfs(buf, &tmp);
  230. return error;
  231. }
  232. asmlinkage long compat_sys_fstatfs(unsigned int fd, struct compat_statfs __user *buf)
  233. {
  234. struct kstatfs tmp;
  235. int error = fd_statfs(fd, &tmp);
  236. if (!error)
  237. error = put_compat_statfs(buf, &tmp);
  238. return error;
  239. }
  240. static int put_compat_statfs64(struct compat_statfs64 __user *ubuf, struct kstatfs *kbuf)
  241. {
  242. if (sizeof ubuf->f_blocks == 4) {
  243. if ((kbuf->f_blocks | kbuf->f_bfree | kbuf->f_bavail |
  244. kbuf->f_bsize | kbuf->f_frsize) & 0xffffffff00000000ULL)
  245. return -EOVERFLOW;
  246. /* f_files and f_ffree may be -1; it's okay
  247. * to stuff that into 32 bits */
  248. if (kbuf->f_files != 0xffffffffffffffffULL
  249. && (kbuf->f_files & 0xffffffff00000000ULL))
  250. return -EOVERFLOW;
  251. if (kbuf->f_ffree != 0xffffffffffffffffULL
  252. && (kbuf->f_ffree & 0xffffffff00000000ULL))
  253. return -EOVERFLOW;
  254. }
  255. if (!access_ok(VERIFY_WRITE, ubuf, sizeof(*ubuf)) ||
  256. __put_user(kbuf->f_type, &ubuf->f_type) ||
  257. __put_user(kbuf->f_bsize, &ubuf->f_bsize) ||
  258. __put_user(kbuf->f_blocks, &ubuf->f_blocks) ||
  259. __put_user(kbuf->f_bfree, &ubuf->f_bfree) ||
  260. __put_user(kbuf->f_bavail, &ubuf->f_bavail) ||
  261. __put_user(kbuf->f_files, &ubuf->f_files) ||
  262. __put_user(kbuf->f_ffree, &ubuf->f_ffree) ||
  263. __put_user(kbuf->f_namelen, &ubuf->f_namelen) ||
  264. __put_user(kbuf->f_fsid.val[0], &ubuf->f_fsid.val[0]) ||
  265. __put_user(kbuf->f_fsid.val[1], &ubuf->f_fsid.val[1]) ||
  266. __put_user(kbuf->f_frsize, &ubuf->f_frsize) ||
  267. __put_user(kbuf->f_flags, &ubuf->f_flags) ||
  268. __clear_user(ubuf->f_spare, sizeof(ubuf->f_spare)))
  269. return -EFAULT;
  270. return 0;
  271. }
  272. asmlinkage long compat_sys_statfs64(const char __user *pathname, compat_size_t sz, struct compat_statfs64 __user *buf)
  273. {
  274. struct kstatfs tmp;
  275. int error;
  276. if (sz != sizeof(*buf))
  277. return -EINVAL;
  278. error = user_statfs(pathname, &tmp);
  279. if (!error)
  280. error = put_compat_statfs64(buf, &tmp);
  281. return error;
  282. }
  283. asmlinkage long compat_sys_fstatfs64(unsigned int fd, compat_size_t sz, struct compat_statfs64 __user *buf)
  284. {
  285. struct kstatfs tmp;
  286. int error;
  287. if (sz != sizeof(*buf))
  288. return -EINVAL;
  289. error = fd_statfs(fd, &tmp);
  290. if (!error)
  291. error = put_compat_statfs64(buf, &tmp);
  292. return error;
  293. }
  294. /*
  295. * This is a copy of sys_ustat, just dealing with a structure layout.
  296. * Given how simple this syscall is that apporach is more maintainable
  297. * than the various conversion hacks.
  298. */
  299. asmlinkage long compat_sys_ustat(unsigned dev, struct compat_ustat __user *u)
  300. {
  301. struct compat_ustat tmp;
  302. struct kstatfs sbuf;
  303. int err = vfs_ustat(new_decode_dev(dev), &sbuf);
  304. if (err)
  305. return err;
  306. memset(&tmp, 0, sizeof(struct compat_ustat));
  307. tmp.f_tfree = sbuf.f_bfree;
  308. tmp.f_tinode = sbuf.f_ffree;
  309. if (copy_to_user(u, &tmp, sizeof(struct compat_ustat)))
  310. return -EFAULT;
  311. return 0;
  312. }
  313. static int get_compat_flock(struct flock *kfl, struct compat_flock __user *ufl)
  314. {
  315. if (!access_ok(VERIFY_READ, ufl, sizeof(*ufl)) ||
  316. __get_user(kfl->l_type, &ufl->l_type) ||
  317. __get_user(kfl->l_whence, &ufl->l_whence) ||
  318. __get_user(kfl->l_start, &ufl->l_start) ||
  319. __get_user(kfl->l_len, &ufl->l_len) ||
  320. __get_user(kfl->l_pid, &ufl->l_pid))
  321. return -EFAULT;
  322. return 0;
  323. }
  324. static int put_compat_flock(struct flock *kfl, struct compat_flock __user *ufl)
  325. {
  326. if (!access_ok(VERIFY_WRITE, ufl, sizeof(*ufl)) ||
  327. __put_user(kfl->l_type, &ufl->l_type) ||
  328. __put_user(kfl->l_whence, &ufl->l_whence) ||
  329. __put_user(kfl->l_start, &ufl->l_start) ||
  330. __put_user(kfl->l_len, &ufl->l_len) ||
  331. __put_user(kfl->l_pid, &ufl->l_pid))
  332. return -EFAULT;
  333. return 0;
  334. }
  335. #ifndef HAVE_ARCH_GET_COMPAT_FLOCK64
  336. static int get_compat_flock64(struct flock *kfl, struct compat_flock64 __user *ufl)
  337. {
  338. if (!access_ok(VERIFY_READ, ufl, sizeof(*ufl)) ||
  339. __get_user(kfl->l_type, &ufl->l_type) ||
  340. __get_user(kfl->l_whence, &ufl->l_whence) ||
  341. __get_user(kfl->l_start, &ufl->l_start) ||
  342. __get_user(kfl->l_len, &ufl->l_len) ||
  343. __get_user(kfl->l_pid, &ufl->l_pid))
  344. return -EFAULT;
  345. return 0;
  346. }
  347. #endif
  348. #ifndef HAVE_ARCH_PUT_COMPAT_FLOCK64
  349. static int put_compat_flock64(struct flock *kfl, struct compat_flock64 __user *ufl)
  350. {
  351. if (!access_ok(VERIFY_WRITE, ufl, sizeof(*ufl)) ||
  352. __put_user(kfl->l_type, &ufl->l_type) ||
  353. __put_user(kfl->l_whence, &ufl->l_whence) ||
  354. __put_user(kfl->l_start, &ufl->l_start) ||
  355. __put_user(kfl->l_len, &ufl->l_len) ||
  356. __put_user(kfl->l_pid, &ufl->l_pid))
  357. return -EFAULT;
  358. return 0;
  359. }
  360. #endif
  361. asmlinkage long compat_sys_fcntl64(unsigned int fd, unsigned int cmd,
  362. unsigned long arg)
  363. {
  364. mm_segment_t old_fs;
  365. struct flock f;
  366. long ret;
  367. switch (cmd) {
  368. case F_GETLK:
  369. case F_SETLK:
  370. case F_SETLKW:
  371. ret = get_compat_flock(&f, compat_ptr(arg));
  372. if (ret != 0)
  373. break;
  374. old_fs = get_fs();
  375. set_fs(KERNEL_DS);
  376. ret = sys_fcntl(fd, cmd, (unsigned long)&f);
  377. set_fs(old_fs);
  378. if (cmd == F_GETLK && ret == 0) {
  379. /* GETLK was successful and we need to return the data...
  380. * but it needs to fit in the compat structure.
  381. * l_start shouldn't be too big, unless the original
  382. * start + end is greater than COMPAT_OFF_T_MAX, in which
  383. * case the app was asking for trouble, so we return
  384. * -EOVERFLOW in that case.
  385. * l_len could be too big, in which case we just truncate it,
  386. * and only allow the app to see that part of the conflicting
  387. * lock that might make sense to it anyway
  388. */
  389. if (f.l_start > COMPAT_OFF_T_MAX)
  390. ret = -EOVERFLOW;
  391. if (f.l_len > COMPAT_OFF_T_MAX)
  392. f.l_le