original development tree for Linux kernel GTP module; now long in mainline.
You can not select more than 25 topics Topics must start with a letter or number, can include dashes ('-') and can be up to 35 characters long.

1595 lines
38 KiB

15 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: rcu_read_lock protection for new rcu_dereference calls Patch "aio: fix rcu sparse warnings introduced by ioctx table lookup patch" (77d30b14d24e557f89c41980011d72428514d729 in linux-next.git) introduced a couple of new rcu_dereference calls which are not protected by rcu_read_lock and result in following warnings during syscall fuzzing(trinity): [ 471.646379] =============================== [ 471.649727] [ INFO: suspicious RCU usage. ] [ 471.653919] 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 Not tainted [ 471.657792] ------------------------------- [ 471.661235] fs/aio.c:503 suspicious rcu_dereference_check() usage! [ 471.665968] [ 471.665968] other info that might help us debug this: [ 471.665968] [ 471.672141] [ 471.672141] rcu_scheduler_active = 1, debug_locks = 1 [ 471.677549] 1 lock held by trinity-child0/3774: [ 471.681675] #0: (&(&mm->ioctx_lock)->rlock){+.+...}, at: [<c119ba1a>] SyS_io_setup+0x63a/0xc70 [ 471.688721] [ 471.688721] stack backtrace: [ 471.692488] CPU: 1 PID: 3774 Comm: trinity-child0 Not tainted 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 [ 471.698437] Hardware name: Bochs Bochs, BIOS Bochs 01/01/2011 [ 471.703151] 00000000 00000000 c58bbf30 c18a814b de2234c0 c58bbf58 c10a4ec6 c1b0d824 [ 471.709544] c1b0f60e 00000001 00000001 c1af61b0 00000000 cb670ac0 c3aca000 c58bbfac [ 471.716251] c119bc7c 00000002 00000001 00000000 c119b8dd 00000000 c10cf684 c58bbfb4 [ 471.722902] Call Trace: [ 471.724859] [<c18a814b>] dump_stack+0x4b/0x66 [ 471.728772] [<c10a4ec6>] lockdep_rcu_suspicious+0xc6/0x100 [ 471.733716] [<c119bc7c>] SyS_io_setup+0x89c/0xc70 [ 471.737806] [<c119b8dd>] ? SyS_io_setup+0x4fd/0xc70 [ 471.741689] [<c10cf684>] ? __audit_syscall_entry+0x94/0xe0 [ 471.746080] [<c18b1fcc>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb [ 471.749723] [<c1080000>] ? task_fork_fair+0x240/0x260 Signed-off-by: Artem Savkov <artem.savkov@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Gu Zheng <guz.fnst@cn.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: rcu_read_lock protection for new rcu_dereference calls Patch "aio: fix rcu sparse warnings introduced by ioctx table lookup patch" (77d30b14d24e557f89c41980011d72428514d729 in linux-next.git) introduced a couple of new rcu_dereference calls which are not protected by rcu_read_lock and result in following warnings during syscall fuzzing(trinity): [ 471.646379] =============================== [ 471.649727] [ INFO: suspicious RCU usage. ] [ 471.653919] 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 Not tainted [ 471.657792] ------------------------------- [ 471.661235] fs/aio.c:503 suspicious rcu_dereference_check() usage! [ 471.665968] [ 471.665968] other info that might help us debug this: [ 471.665968] [ 471.672141] [ 471.672141] rcu_scheduler_active = 1, debug_locks = 1 [ 471.677549] 1 lock held by trinity-child0/3774: [ 471.681675] #0: (&(&mm->ioctx_lock)->rlock){+.+...}, at: [<c119ba1a>] SyS_io_setup+0x63a/0xc70 [ 471.688721] [ 471.688721] stack backtrace: [ 471.692488] CPU: 1 PID: 3774 Comm: trinity-child0 Not tainted 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 [ 471.698437] Hardware name: Bochs Bochs, BIOS Bochs 01/01/2011 [ 471.703151] 00000000 00000000 c58bbf30 c18a814b de2234c0 c58bbf58 c10a4ec6 c1b0d824 [ 471.709544] c1b0f60e 00000001 00000001 c1af61b0 00000000 cb670ac0 c3aca000 c58bbfac [ 471.716251] c119bc7c 00000002 00000001 00000000 c119b8dd 00000000 c10cf684 c58bbfb4 [ 471.722902] Call Trace: [ 471.724859] [<c18a814b>] dump_stack+0x4b/0x66 [ 471.728772] [<c10a4ec6>] lockdep_rcu_suspicious+0xc6/0x100 [ 471.733716] [<c119bc7c>] SyS_io_setup+0x89c/0xc70 [ 471.737806] [<c119b8dd>] ? SyS_io_setup+0x4fd/0xc70 [ 471.741689] [<c10cf684>] ? __audit_syscall_entry+0x94/0xe0 [ 471.746080] [<c18b1fcc>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb [ 471.749723] [<c1080000>] ? task_fork_fair+0x240/0x260 Signed-off-by: Artem Savkov <artem.savkov@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Gu Zheng <guz.fnst@cn.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: rcu_read_lock protection for new rcu_dereference calls Patch "aio: fix rcu sparse warnings introduced by ioctx table lookup patch" (77d30b14d24e557f89c41980011d72428514d729 in linux-next.git) introduced a couple of new rcu_dereference calls which are not protected by rcu_read_lock and result in following warnings during syscall fuzzing(trinity): [ 471.646379] =============================== [ 471.649727] [ INFO: suspicious RCU usage. ] [ 471.653919] 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 Not tainted [ 471.657792] ------------------------------- [ 471.661235] fs/aio.c:503 suspicious rcu_dereference_check() usage! [ 471.665968] [ 471.665968] other info that might help us debug this: [ 471.665968] [ 471.672141] [ 471.672141] rcu_scheduler_active = 1, debug_locks = 1 [ 471.677549] 1 lock held by trinity-child0/3774: [ 471.681675] #0: (&(&mm->ioctx_lock)->rlock){+.+...}, at: [<c119ba1a>] SyS_io_setup+0x63a/0xc70 [ 471.688721] [ 471.688721] stack backtrace: [ 471.692488] CPU: 1 PID: 3774 Comm: trinity-child0 Not tainted 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 [ 471.698437] Hardware name: Bochs Bochs, BIOS Bochs 01/01/2011 [ 471.703151] 00000000 00000000 c58bbf30 c18a814b de2234c0 c58bbf58 c10a4ec6 c1b0d824 [ 471.709544] c1b0f60e 00000001 00000001 c1af61b0 00000000 cb670ac0 c3aca000 c58bbfac [ 471.716251] c119bc7c 00000002 00000001 00000000 c119b8dd 00000000 c10cf684 c58bbfb4 [ 471.722902] Call Trace: [ 471.724859] [<c18a814b>] dump_stack+0x4b/0x66 [ 471.728772] [<c10a4ec6>] lockdep_rcu_suspicious+0xc6/0x100 [ 471.733716] [<c119bc7c>] SyS_io_setup+0x89c/0xc70 [ 471.737806] [<c119b8dd>] ? SyS_io_setup+0x4fd/0xc70 [ 471.741689] [<c10cf684>] ? __audit_syscall_entry+0x94/0xe0 [ 471.746080] [<c18b1fcc>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb [ 471.749723] [<c1080000>] ? task_fork_fair+0x240/0x260 Signed-off-by: Artem Savkov <artem.savkov@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Gu Zheng <guz.fnst@cn.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: rcu_read_lock protection for new rcu_dereference calls Patch "aio: fix rcu sparse warnings introduced by ioctx table lookup patch" (77d30b14d24e557f89c41980011d72428514d729 in linux-next.git) introduced a couple of new rcu_dereference calls which are not protected by rcu_read_lock and result in following warnings during syscall fuzzing(trinity): [ 471.646379] =============================== [ 471.649727] [ INFO: suspicious RCU usage. ] [ 471.653919] 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 Not tainted [ 471.657792] ------------------------------- [ 471.661235] fs/aio.c:503 suspicious rcu_dereference_check() usage! [ 471.665968] [ 471.665968] other info that might help us debug this: [ 471.665968] [ 471.672141] [ 471.672141] rcu_scheduler_active = 1, debug_locks = 1 [ 471.677549] 1 lock held by trinity-child0/3774: [ 471.681675] #0: (&(&mm->ioctx_lock)->rlock){+.+...}, at: [<c119ba1a>] SyS_io_setup+0x63a/0xc70 [ 471.688721] [ 471.688721] stack backtrace: [ 471.692488] CPU: 1 PID: 3774 Comm: trinity-child0 Not tainted 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 [ 471.698437] Hardware name: Bochs Bochs, BIOS Bochs 01/01/2011 [ 471.703151] 00000000 00000000 c58bbf30 c18a814b de2234c0 c58bbf58 c10a4ec6 c1b0d824 [ 471.709544] c1b0f60e 00000001 00000001 c1af61b0 00000000 cb670ac0 c3aca000 c58bbfac [ 471.716251] c119bc7c 00000002 00000001 00000000 c119b8dd 00000000 c10cf684 c58bbfb4 [ 471.722902] Call Trace: [ 471.724859] [<c18a814b>] dump_stack+0x4b/0x66 [ 471.728772] [<c10a4ec6>] lockdep_rcu_suspicious+0xc6/0x100 [ 471.733716] [<c119bc7c>] SyS_io_setup+0x89c/0xc70 [ 471.737806] [<c119b8dd>] ? SyS_io_setup+0x4fd/0xc70 [ 471.741689] [<c10cf684>] ? __audit_syscall_entry+0x94/0xe0 [ 471.746080] [<c18b1fcc>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb [ 471.749723] [<c1080000>] ? task_fork_fair+0x240/0x260 Signed-off-by: Artem Savkov <artem.savkov@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Gu Zheng <guz.fnst@cn.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: rcu_read_lock protection for new rcu_dereference calls Patch "aio: fix rcu sparse warnings introduced by ioctx table lookup patch" (77d30b14d24e557f89c41980011d72428514d729 in linux-next.git) introduced a couple of new rcu_dereference calls which are not protected by rcu_read_lock and result in following warnings during syscall fuzzing(trinity): [ 471.646379] =============================== [ 471.649727] [ INFO: suspicious RCU usage. ] [ 471.653919] 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 Not tainted [ 471.657792] ------------------------------- [ 471.661235] fs/aio.c:503 suspicious rcu_dereference_check() usage! [ 471.665968] [ 471.665968] other info that might help us debug this: [ 471.665968] [ 471.672141] [ 471.672141] rcu_scheduler_active = 1, debug_locks = 1 [ 471.677549] 1 lock held by trinity-child0/3774: [ 471.681675] #0: (&(&mm->ioctx_lock)->rlock){+.+...}, at: [<c119ba1a>] SyS_io_setup+0x63a/0xc70 [ 471.688721] [ 471.688721] stack backtrace: [ 471.692488] CPU: 1 PID: 3774 Comm: trinity-child0 Not tainted 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 [ 471.698437] Hardware name: Bochs Bochs, BIOS Bochs 01/01/2011 [ 471.703151] 00000000 00000000 c58bbf30 c18a814b de2234c0 c58bbf58 c10a4ec6 c1b0d824 [ 471.709544] c1b0f60e 00000001 00000001 c1af61b0 00000000 cb670ac0 c3aca000 c58bbfac [ 471.716251] c119bc7c 00000002 00000001 00000000 c119b8dd 00000000 c10cf684 c58bbfb4 [ 471.722902] Call Trace: [ 471.724859] [<c18a814b>] dump_stack+0x4b/0x66 [ 471.728772] [<c10a4ec6>] lockdep_rcu_suspicious+0xc6/0x100 [ 471.733716] [<c119bc7c>] SyS_io_setup+0x89c/0xc70 [ 471.737806] [<c119b8dd>] ? SyS_io_setup+0x4fd/0xc70 [ 471.741689] [<c10cf684>] ? __audit_syscall_entry+0x94/0xe0 [ 471.746080] [<c18b1fcc>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb [ 471.749723] [<c1080000>] ? task_fork_fair+0x240/0x260 Signed-off-by: Artem Savkov <artem.savkov@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Gu Zheng <guz.fnst@cn.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: rcu_read_lock protection for new rcu_dereference calls Patch "aio: fix rcu sparse warnings introduced by ioctx table lookup patch" (77d30b14d24e557f89c41980011d72428514d729 in linux-next.git) introduced a couple of new rcu_dereference calls which are not protected by rcu_read_lock and result in following warnings during syscall fuzzing(trinity): [ 471.646379] =============================== [ 471.649727] [ INFO: suspicious RCU usage. ] [ 471.653919] 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 Not tainted [ 471.657792] ------------------------------- [ 471.661235] fs/aio.c:503 suspicious rcu_dereference_check() usage! [ 471.665968] [ 471.665968] other info that might help us debug this: [ 471.665968] [ 471.672141] [ 471.672141] rcu_scheduler_active = 1, debug_locks = 1 [ 471.677549] 1 lock held by trinity-child0/3774: [ 471.681675] #0: (&(&mm->ioctx_lock)->rlock){+.+...}, at: [<c119ba1a>] SyS_io_setup+0x63a/0xc70 [ 471.688721] [ 471.688721] stack backtrace: [ 471.692488] CPU: 1 PID: 3774 Comm: trinity-child0 Not tainted 3.11.0-next-20130906+ #496 [ 471.698437] Hardware name: Bochs Bochs, BIOS Bochs 01/01/2011 [ 471.703151] 00000000 00000000 c58bbf30 c18a814b de2234c0 c58bbf58 c10a4ec6 c1b0d824 [ 471.709544] c1b0f60e 00000001 00000001 c1af61b0 00000000 cb670ac0 c3aca000 c58bbfac [ 471.716251] c119bc7c 00000002 00000001 00000000 c119b8dd 00000000 c10cf684 c58bbfb4 [ 471.722902] Call Trace: [ 471.724859] [<c18a814b>] dump_stack+0x4b/0x66 [ 471.728772] [<c10a4ec6>] lockdep_rcu_suspicious+0xc6/0x100 [ 471.733716] [<c119bc7c>] SyS_io_setup+0x89c/0xc70 [ 471.737806] [<c119b8dd>] ? SyS_io_setup+0x4fd/0xc70 [ 471.741689] [<c10cf684>] ? __audit_syscall_entry+0x94/0xe0 [ 471.746080] [<c18b1fcc>] syscall_call+0x7/0xb [ 471.749723] [<c1080000>] ? task_fork_fair+0x240/0x260 Signed-off-by: Artem Savkov <artem.savkov@gmail.com> Reviewed-by: Gu Zheng <guz.fnst@cn.fujitsu.com> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
[PATCH] aio: fix buggy put_ioctx call in aio_complete - v2 An AIO bug was reported that sleeping function is being called in softirq context: BUG: warning at kernel/mutex.c:132/__mutex_lock_common() Call Trace: [<a000000100577b00>] __mutex_lock_slowpath+0x640/0x6c0 [<a000000100577ba0>] mutex_lock+0x20/0x40 [<a0000001000a25b0>] flush_workqueue+0xb0/0x1a0 [<a00000010018c0c0>] __put_ioctx+0xc0/0x240 [<a00000010018d470>] aio_complete+0x2f0/0x420 [<a00000010019cc80>] finished_one_bio+0x200/0x2a0 [<a00000010019d1c0>] dio_bio_complete+0x1c0/0x200 [<a00000010019d260>] dio_bio_end_aio+0x60/0x80 [<a00000010014acd0>] bio_endio+0x110/0x1c0 [<a0000001002770e0>] __end_that_request_first+0x180/0xba0 [<a000000100277b90>] end_that_request_chunk+0x30/0x60 [<a0000002073c0c70>] scsi_end_request+0x50/0x300 [scsi_mod] [<a0000002073c1240>] scsi_io_completion+0x200/0x8a0 [scsi_mod] [<a0000002074729b0>] sd_rw_intr+0x330/0x860 [sd_mod] [<a0000002073b3ac0>] scsi_finish_command+0x100/0x1c0 [scsi_mod] [<a0000002073c2910>] scsi_softirq_done+0x230/0x300 [scsi_mod] [<a000000100277d20>] blk_done_softirq+0x160/0x1c0 [<a000000100083e00>] __do_softirq+0x200/0x240 [<a000000100083eb0>] do_softirq+0x70/0xc0 See report: http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=linux-kernel&m=116599593200888&w=2 flush_workqueue() is not allowed to be called in the softirq context. However, aio_complete() called from I/O interrupt can potentially call put_ioctx with last ref count on ioctx and triggers bug. It is simply incorrect to perform ioctx freeing from aio_complete. The bug is trigger-able from a race between io_destroy() and aio_complete(). A possible scenario: cpu0 cpu1 io_destroy aio_complete wait_for_all_aios { __aio_put_req ... ctx->reqs_active--; if (!ctx->reqs_active) return; } ... put_ioctx(ioctx) put_ioctx(ctx); __put_ioctx bam! Bug trigger! The real problem is that the condition check of ctx->reqs_active in wait_for_all_aios() is incorrect that access to reqs_active is not being properly protected by spin lock. This patch adds that protective spin lock, and at the same time removes all duplicate ref counting for each kiocb as reqs_active is already used as a ref count for each active ioctx. This also ensures that buggy call to flush_workqueue() in softirq context is eliminated. Signed-off-by: "Ken Chen" <kenchen@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zach.brown@oracle.com> Cc: Suparna Bhattacharya <suparna@in.ibm.com> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Cc: Badari Pulavarty <pbadari@us.ibm.com> Cc: <stable@kernel.org> Acked-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
15 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: fix io_destroy() regression by using call_rcu() There was a regression introduced by 36f5588905c1 ("aio: refcounting cleanup"), reported by Jens Axboe - the refcounting cleanup switched to using RCU in the shutdown path, but the synchronize_rcu() was done in the context of the io_destroy() syscall greatly increasing the time it could block. This patch switches it to call_rcu() and makes shutdown asynchronous (more asynchronous than it was originally; before the refcount changes io_destroy() would still wait on pending kiocbs). Note that there's a global quota on the max outstanding kiocbs, and that quota must be manipulated synchronously; otherwise io_setup() could return -EAGAIN when there isn't quota available, and userspace won't have any way of waiting until shutdown of the old kioctxs has finished (besides busy looping). So we release our quota before kioctx shutdown has finished, which should be fine since the quota never corresponded to anything real anyways. Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Reported-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Tested-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Tested-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
8 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: fix io_destroy() regression by using call_rcu() There was a regression introduced by 36f5588905c1 ("aio: refcounting cleanup"), reported by Jens Axboe - the refcounting cleanup switched to using RCU in the shutdown path, but the synchronize_rcu() was done in the context of the io_destroy() syscall greatly increasing the time it could block. This patch switches it to call_rcu() and makes shutdown asynchronous (more asynchronous than it was originally; before the refcount changes io_destroy() would still wait on pending kiocbs). Note that there's a global quota on the max outstanding kiocbs, and that quota must be manipulated synchronously; otherwise io_setup() could return -EAGAIN when there isn't quota available, and userspace won't have any way of waiting until shutdown of the old kioctxs has finished (besides busy looping). So we release our quota before kioctx shutdown has finished, which should be fine since the quota never corresponded to anything real anyways. Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Reported-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Tested-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Tested-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
8 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: refcounting cleanup The usage of ctx->dead was fubar - it makes no sense to explicitly check it all over the place, especially when we're already using RCU. Now, ctx->dead only indicates whether we've dropped the initial refcount. The new teardown sequence is: set ctx->dead hlist_del_rcu(); synchronize_rcu(); Now we know no system calls can take a new ref, and it's safe to drop the initial ref: put_ioctx(); We also need to ensure there are no more outstanding kiocbs. This was done incorrectly - it was being done in kill_ctx(), and before dropping the initial refcount. At this point, other syscalls may still be submitting kiocbs! Now, we cancel and wait for outstanding kiocbs in free_ioctx(), after kioctx->users has dropped to 0 and we know no more iocbs could be submitted. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Cc: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: make aio_put_req() lockless Freeing a kiocb needed to touch the kioctx for three things: * Pull it off the reqs_active list * Decrementing reqs_active * Issuing a wakeup, if the kioctx was in the process of being freed. This patch moves these to aio_complete(), for a couple reasons: * aio_complete() already has to issue the wakeup, so if we drop the kioctx refcount before aio_complete does its wakeup we don't have to do it twice. * aio_complete currently has to take the kioctx lock, so it makes sense for it to pull the kiocb off the reqs_active list too. * A later patch is going to change reqs_active to include unreaped completions - this will mean allocating a kiocb doesn't have to look at the ringbuffer. So taking the decrement of reqs_active out of kiocb_free() is useful prep work for that patch. This doesn't really affect cancellation, since existing (usb) code that implements a cancel function still calls aio_complete() - we just have to make sure that aio_complete does the necessary teardown for cancelled kiocbs. It does affect code paths where we free kiocbs that were never submitted; they need to decrement reqs_active and pull the kiocb off the reqs_active list. This occurs in two places: kiocb_batch_free(), which is going away in a later patch, and the error path in io_submit_one. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Acked-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: convert the ioctx list to table lookup v3 On Wed, Jun 12, 2013 at 11:14:40AM -0700, Kent Overstreet wrote: > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 02:40:55PM +0300, Octavian Purdila wrote: > > When using a large number of threads performing AIO operations the > > IOCTX list may get a significant number of entries which will cause > > significant overhead. For example, when running this fio script: > > > > rw=randrw; size=256k ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=512; thread; loops=100 > > > > on an EXT2 filesystem mounted on top of a ramdisk we can observe up to > > 30% CPU time spent by lookup_ioctx: > > > > 32.51% [guest.kernel] [g] lookup_ioctx > > 9.19% [guest.kernel] [g] __lock_acquire.isra.28 > > 4.40% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release > > 4.19% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_local > > 3.86% [guest.kernel] [g] local_clock > > 3.68% [guest.kernel] [g] native_sched_clock > > 3.08% [guest.kernel] [g] sched_clock_cpu > > 2.64% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_release_holdtime.part.11 > > 2.60% [guest.kernel] [g] memcpy > > 2.33% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquired > > 2.25% [guest.kernel] [g] lock_acquire > > 1.84% [guest.kernel] [g] do_io_submit > > > > This patchs converts the ioctx list to a radix tree. For a performance > > comparison the above FIO script was run on a 2 sockets 8 core > > machine. This are the results (average and %rsd of 10 runs) for the > > original list based implementation and for the radix tree based > > implementation: > > > > cores 1 2 4 8 16 32 > > list 109376 ms 69119 ms 35682 ms 22671 ms 19724 ms 16408 ms > > %rsd 0.69% 1.15% 1.17% 1.21% 1.71% 1.43% > > radix 73651 ms 41748 ms 23028 ms 16766 ms 15232 ms 13787 ms > > %rsd 1.19% 0.98% 0.69% 1.13% 0.72% 0.75% > > % of radix > > relative 66.12% 65.59% 66.63% 72.31% 77.26% 83.66% > > to list > > > > To consider the impact of the patch on the typical case of having > > only one ctx per process the following FIO script was run: > > > > rw=randrw; size=100m ;directory=/mnt/fio; ioengine=libaio; iodepth=1 > > blocksize=1024; numjobs=1; thread; loops=100 > > > > on the same system and the results are the following: > > > > list 58892 ms > > %rsd 0.91% > > radix 59404 ms > > %rsd 0.81% > > % of radix > > relative 100.87% > > to list > > So, I was just doing some benchmarking/profiling to get ready to send > out the aio patches I've got for 3.11 - and it looks like your patch is > causing a ~1.5% throughput regression in my testing :/ ... <snip> I've got an alternate approach for fixing this wart in lookup_ioctx()... Instead of using an rbtree, just use the reserved id in the ring buffer header to index an array pointing the ioctx. It's not finished yet, and it needs to be tidied up, but is most of the way there. -ben -- "Thought is the essence of where you are now." -- kmo> And, a rework of Ben's code, but this was entirely his idea kmo> -Kent bcrl> And fix the code to use the right mm_struct in kill_ioctx(), actually free memory. Signed-off-by: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org>
8 years ago
aio: make aio_put_req() lockless Freeing a kiocb needed to touch the kioctx for three things: * Pull it off the reqs_active list * Decrementing reqs_active * Issuing a wakeup, if the kioctx was in the process of being freed. This patch moves these to aio_complete(), for a couple reasons: * aio_complete() already has to issue the wakeup, so if we drop the kioctx refcount before aio_complete does its wakeup we don't have to do it twice. * aio_complete currently has to take the kioctx lock, so it makes sense for it to pull the kiocb off the reqs_active list too. * A later patch is going to change reqs_active to include unreaped completions - this will mean allocating a kiocb doesn't have to look at the ringbuffer. So taking the decrement of reqs_active out of kiocb_free() is useful prep work for that patch. This doesn't really affect cancellation, since existing (usb) code that implements a cancel function still calls aio_complete() - we just have to make sure that aio_complete does the necessary teardown for cancelled kiocbs. It does affect code paths where we free kiocbs that were never submitted; they need to decrement reqs_active and pull the kiocb off the reqs_active list. This occurs in two places: kiocb_batch_free(), which is going away in a later patch, and the error path in io_submit_one. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes] Signed-off-by: Kent Overstreet <koverstreet@google.com> Cc: Zach Brown <zab@redhat.com> Cc: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com> Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org> Cc: Mark Fasheh <mfasheh@suse.com> Cc: Joel Becker <jlbec@evilplan.org> Cc: Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au> Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> Cc: Asai Thambi S P <asamymuthupa@micron.com> Cc: Selvan Mani <smani@micron.com> Cc: Sam Bradshaw <sbradshaw@micron.com> Acked-by: Jeff Moyer <jmoyer@redhat.com> Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Reviewed-by: "Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
9 years ago
aio: bad AIO race in aio_complete() leads to process hang My group ran into a AIO process hang on a 2.6.24 kernel with the process sleeping indefinitely in io_getevents(2) waiting for the last wakeup to come and it never would. We ran the tests on x86_64 SMP. The hang only occurred on a Xeon box ("Clovertown") but not a Core2Duo ("Conroe"). On the Xeon, the L2 cache isn't shared between all eight processors, but is L2 is shared between between all two processors on the Core2Duo we use. My analysis of the hang is if you go down to the second while-loop in read_events(), what happens on processor #1: 1) add_wait_queue_exclusive() adds thread to ctx->wait 2) aio_read_evt() to check tail 3) if aio_read_evt() returned 0, call [io_]schedule() and sleep In aio_complete() with processor #2: A) info->tail = tail; B) waitqueue_active(&ctx->wait) C) if waitqueue_active() returned non-0, call wake_up() The way the code is written, step 1 must be seen by all other processors before processor 1 checks for pending events in step 2 (that were recorded by step A) and step A by processor 2 must be seen by all other processors (checked in step 2) before step B is done. The race I believed I was seeing is that steps 1 and 2 were effectively swapped due to the __list_add() being delayed by the L2 cache not shared by some of the other processors. Imagine: proc 2: just before step A proc 1, step 1: adds to ctx->wait, but is not visible by other processors yet proc 1, step 2: checks tail and sees no pending events proc 2, step A: updates tail proc 1, step 3: calls [io_]schedule() and sleeps proc 2, step B: checks ctx->wait, but sees no one waiting, skips wakeup so proc 1 sleeps indefinitely My patch adds a memory barrier between steps A and B. It ensures that the update in step 1 gets seen on processor 2 before continuing. If processor 1 was just before step 1, the memory barrier makes sure that step A (update tail) gets seen by the time processor 1 makes it to step 2 (check tail). Before the patch our AIO process would hang virtually 100% of the time. After the patch, we have yet to see the process ever hang. Signed-off-by: Quentin Barnes <qbarnes+linux@yahoo-inc.com> Reviewed-by: Zach Brown <zach.brown@oracle.com> Cc: Benjamin LaHaise <bcrl@kvack.org> Cc: <stable@kernel.org> Cc: Nick Piggin <nickpiggin@yahoo.com.au> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> [ We should probably disallow that "if (waitqueue_active()) wake_up()" coding pattern, because it's so often buggy wrt memory ordering ] Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
14 years ago